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I'm currently reading Aton Edwards "Preparedness Now!" (Process Media, 2006). It's a decent read, mostly of interest to urban situations, building checklists, etc. The author witnessed 9/11 in NY and acknowledges that (for instance, Katrina) the government just does not have the resources to deal with a regional disaster. While this book will not give you in-depth instructions on herbs, farming, hunting, self-defense, etc. it's a reasonable starting off point on building your checklists.

The one drawback I have with this book, and some others, is the emphasis on spending a lot of money on gear. It's like the Y2K industry. I've seen people like **** Proenneke and get the feeling that they could be basically self-sufficient with little more than a good ax, knife, firearm, means of starting fire, and wool blankets. You really don't need to spend $600 on a bug out bag. Or 'E-Kit' or 'Grab-And-Go' bag as the author here calls it.
 

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I agree $600.00 bucks for anything less than a weapon or car is STEEP! My $45.00 large ALICE does a great job. Include Thrift store BDU's, homemade MRE's. First Aid from CVS and an incidental emergency room visit. I really have not spent a mint on my BOB but it is also my weekend hunting bag.
 

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To me, being a survivalist is being able to take care of myself.

I try to reasonable about what I purchase. Is it something I will use again and again.? Is it something that will bring back a bigger return? Will my life be more comfortable because of this item?

One of the big things my husband and I did was pay off our property. All we have to worry about now is insurance and property tax. It will give us a place to survive.

I have a garden, orchard and can get the chicken house and rabbit cages going again when I retire in 5 years.

This past summer I started my first bee hive. This will give me a good source of sweetener and wax and a bartering tool. I plan on expanding this venture.

I do a lot of sewing, knitting and crochet. These are all useful skills when everything has to be worn out before using as char cloth. Ha! Ha!

I can food, dry food and cook food from scratch. I don't need a cookbook to keep dinner tasty and different.

I have several skills that I use on our property. I didn't pay a fortune for these skills. I did pay in trial and error and a little blood. But it was worth the effort.

I have cultivated friendships in my valley with like minds. We will be backing each other up through the hard times to come.

Sharing my knowlege and skills helps lighten the load on myself.

Being a thoughtfull, frugal survivalist is not a capital venture, it is a venture of the soul.
 
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