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Stuck in the City...
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So i have grown them on accident in my mulch pile a few years ago.
i have planted some that were sitting on the counter a few years ago. I get some good green leaves but when i dig them up there are no little taters..
i have planted several varieties, with no luck. this year some i planted last year came up on their own. I had some nice strong looking green leaves and stems. So i buried the the stems with mulch about half way. yesterday i noticed the snails ate about half the stems.

when will they be ready to dig up?
are they safe to eat?

its been wet and in the 40's at night. and warmer during the day when it hasnt been raining.

any tips?

thanks!!
 

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So i have grown them on accident in my mulch pile a few years ago.
i have planted some that were sitting on the counter a few years ago. I get some good green leaves but when i dig them up there are no little taters..
i have planted several varieties, with no luck. this year some i planted last year came up on their own. I had some nice strong looking green leaves and stems. So i buried the the stems with mulch about half way. yesterday i noticed the snails ate about half the stems.

when will they be ready to dig up?
are they safe to eat?

its been wet and in the 40's at night. and warmer during the day when it hasnt been raining.

any tips?

thanks!!
Potatoes aren't really ready to dig up until the tops have died right off... unless you have a 'new potato' variety in which case you start testing when they're in full flower.

Snails are a pain, try putting something annoying around the potatoes, like sand - something you can dig in later, which won't ruin the soil. Crushed up eggshells is used too. There's another bug.. stem weevil I think it's called? Someone else jump in please lol - will chomp through stems. Good rotation controls the population of these things, together with really clearing away debris and burning anything infested before composting it.

Water seems fine - i tend to think you're trying to harvest too early to be honest. Potatoes usually take 100 days ish.

The only other thing I'd worry about would be rot; potatoes grown in the same ground year after year can end up with fungal diseases where the tuber just rots to a smelly goo in the soil - but you'd know if you hit one of those.

Oh.. in closing. 40s... (being farenheit I'm not sure what that is, possibly around 2 degrees above freezing) - potatoes die off in frost but in milder climates, eg here, we can overwinter the taties in the ground, harvesting as needed (keeps them fresher than digging & storing, too).

They'll be fine to eat, when you get them. Good luck. :)

Oh - and they're hungry. A good all round fertiliser, not just nitrogen.
Double oh - you're right, not GMO - and they're clones anyway so it doesn't matter.
 

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Where the Elite meet
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Potatoes aren't really ready to dig up until the tops have died right off... unless you have a 'new potato' variety in which case you start testing when they're in full flower.

Snails are a pain, try putting something annoying around the potatoes, like sand - something you can dig in later, which won't ruin the soil. Crushed up eggshells is used too. There's another bug.. stem weevil I think it's called? Someone else jump in please lol - will chomp through stems. Good rotation controls the population of these things, together with really clearing away debris and burning anything infested before composting it.

Water seems fine - i tend to think you're trying to harvest too early to be honest. Potatoes usually take 100 days ish.

The only other thing I'd worry about would be rot; potatoes grown in the same ground year after year can end up with fungal diseases where the tuber just rots to a smelly goo in the soil - but you'd know if you hit one of those.
Beer also works well for snails. Fill a shallow container with beer and they'll flock to it and drown in drunken delight.
 

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The thing about potato is

whether young or old

they put tingles in my toes.

Never met a tater I did not like

no matter how severed.

Use to eat raw taters but they did give a belly ache if too many eaten.

We eat the leaves of sweet potatos. Never eaten leaves of the regular potato. Can you eat the leaves.

later
wayne
 

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Wayne, I don't believe you should eat the leaves of a regular potato plant. They're poisonous.
 

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Potatoes aren't really ready to dig up until the tops have died right off... unless you have a 'new potato' variety in which case you start testing when they're in full flower.

All potato plants grow new potatoes. Simply pull up or pop the plant up with a shovel and pick the small/new potatoes. When done reset the plant back in the ground. The plant will set new tators or the ones left will increase more due to less competition. It's best to do this from several plants rather than stealing one plant blind.
 

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The tater and mater are of the night shade family. I don't think i,d eat that, google night shade family and you will be surprised on the veggies.
 

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growing potatoes

When the top of the tater plant dies - they are ready to dig up.

Also, what kind of fertilizer are you using? You said the tops were large and green? That might indicate your using too much nitrogen fertilizer.

For potatoes, use something like 10-20-10, or 13-13-13. And stay away from 16-6-12, and 21-0-0.

If you use commercial fertilizer, root crops need a high middle number.

First number - large green leaves, corn, greens, squash
Second number - promotes root growth, potatoes and onions
Third number - promotes pod growth, like for peas and snap beans

A lot of people (like myself) use a balanced fertilizer such as 13-13-13. But triple 13 can be a little "harsh" on some plants.

I'am planning on planting some potatoes within the next 2 weeks. For the fertilzier I'am going to use 10-20-10. The ground will be tilled up and fertilized about 1 - 2 weeks before the actual planting.

Red potatoes (irish potatoes) seem to be more productive then butter (yellow) potatoes.
 

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Red potatoes (irish potatoes) seem to be more productive then butter (yellow) potatoes.
I agree. We enjoy yellow potatoes but get much large yields from the reds. Our favorite is Red Pontiac. It's tastes great, harvests well, and keeps excellently.
 

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Bail me out
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what Kev said is most likely the culprit fertilizer ratios make all the difference in the world.
 

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I was hoping to start the plowing and planting of potatoes in the next fews weeks but weather may play a big part in doing it.
 

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what about natural fertilizers, instead of chemical ones?... anyone have any tips on what to use for natural/organic fertilizers?
 

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what about natural fertilizers, instead of chemical ones?... anyone have any tips on what to use for natural/organic fertilizers?
We simply use cow manure and compost from our compost pile. Manure tilled in the beds in the autumn and compost in the spring. We buy the manure (it's dead cheap) and simply make the compost from kitchen scraps and vegetation from the garden. It works a charm.
 

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Stuck in the City...
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Discussion Starter #18
i dont really use fertilizer in my garden, it is mostly compost. the particular plant i wrote this post about i think got eaten by some slugs. i just noticed today that i have about 6 new plants popping up in another location. hopefully they ill mature.

100 days huh?? so that about 80 more to go. cant wait.

i see my local OSH hardware now is selling potato "seed" which is just a bunch of potatoes. why buy those vs. a bag at the grocery story or loose from the farmers market?

i also think i was harvesting to early.. i get a little to excited i suppose.

thanks for all the replys.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The only other thing I'd worry about would be rot; potatoes grown in the same ground year after year can end up with fungal diseases where the tuber just rots to a smelly goo in the soil - but you'd know if you hit one of those.

Oh.. in closing. 40s... (being farenheit I'm not sure what that is, possibly around 2 degrees above freezing) - potatoes die off in frost but in milder climates, eg here, we can overwinter the taties in the ground, harvesting as needed (keeps them fresher than digging & storing, too).
32f is freezing or 0c/ so 40 is about.. 5c?
 
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