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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Potatoes, peas and corn - plant them in that order.

Commercial grade fertilizer has 3 numbers, such as 13-13-13. Those three numbers stand for nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (also called Pot Ash).

nitrogen - large leaves, tall growth - greens, spinach, corn, okra
phosphorus - root growth - potatoes, turnips
potassium / pot ash - pod production - peas, beans, corn, okra, squash

Potatoes use fertilizers with a high middle number, such as 10-20-10 fertilizer. The higher phosphorus content helps promote root growth.

Peas produce their own nitrogen and returns it to the soil.

Corn needs nitrogen to grow tall stalks.

Plant the potatoes in early spring. Shortly after the potatoes are harvested, plant some fall peas or snap beans. The peas or beans will finish using the fertilizer left over by the potatoes and return nitrogen to the soil.

The following spring, plant corn. Or maybe even plant the 3 sisters - corn, squash and peas.

When your looking at peas, look for BVR. The BVR peas are Virus Resistant.

Choose field corn over sweet corn. Just about all sweet corn is hybrid.

Do not plant squash and zucchini next to each other, because they will cross pollinate. The seeds will either be a hybrid, or will not be viable for next years garden.
 

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Add a mycorhizal innoculant like N-Dure, Oregonism XL, or the like if your peas /beans are not already inoculated for a real boost!

Golden Bantam sweet corn is OP.
 

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I always put my peas in first. They can take a frost that kills the potatoes.

I don't bother with all that numbered stuff that you find in the store. When push comes to shove you'll have to go back to the old way anyway so may as well get used to it.
 

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Plant the peas, or beans, with the corn. They will fix nitrogen in the soil that your corn will use. I believe that many Indians (as they were called in the time--or native Americans for the PC crowd) did this and also would plant squash in the the fields with the legumes and corn. I believe it was for the ground cover benefits of the squash keeping the soil protected during the hotter times of the summer.
 

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The majority of field corn are hybrids as well. If you wish to stay away from hybrids make sure to look carefully at the product you are purchasing.

Also it is more common with field corn to coat the seeds with herbicides and fungicides to give a better germination rate. These chemicals could be detrimental to other crops growing right next to the corn. Once again look carefully at the product you are purchasing.
 

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Plant the peas, or beans, with the corn. They will fix nitrogen in the soil that your corn will use. I believe that many Indians (as they were called in the time--or native Americans for the PC crowd) did this and also would plant squash in the the fields with the legumes and corn. I believe it was for the ground cover benefits of the squash keeping the soil protected during the hotter times of the summer.
kev mentioned that. it's called the three sisters method... :thumb:
 

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Plant the peas, or beans, with the corn. They will fix nitrogen in the soil that your corn will use. I believe that many Indians (as they were called in the time--or native Americans for the PC crowd) did this and also would plant squash in the the fields with the legumes and corn. I believe it was for the ground cover benefits of the squash keeping the soil protected during the hotter times of the summer.
The squash/pumpkins shade the soil and conserve water as the post above mentions. Also, the squash/pumpkin shade keeps the weeds down and keeps the deer away. The deer do not like to walk through pumpkin vines because the texture of the vine is scratchy. Sweet corn is more of a target for deer; I plant pumpkins around it and I have never had a problem with deer.

This works just like home protection: if mine is the only corn, or home, around the deer, or bad guys, will find a way in. As long as there is an easier target, I'm safe.
 

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Golden Bantam is an open pollinated sweet corn, unfortunately it's not very blight resistant or heat tolerant. But it tastes way better'n cow corn.
 

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Potatoes, peas and corn - plant them in that order.


Do not plant squash and zucchini next to each other, because they will cross pollinate. The seeds will either be a hybrid, or will not be viable for next years garden.
yeah,.. oops. i did this last year. I planted zucchini and yellow squash within 20 feet of each other and i had a TON of yellow squash and NOT ONE Zucc... i couldnt figure it out until i gave my neighbor some Zucc seeds and he got plenty of Zucc's/// it then dawned on me what had happened..
i thought the seed company screwed up....
 

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yeah,.. oops. i did this last year. I planted zucchini and yellow squash within 20 feet of each other and i had a TON of yellow squash and NOT ONE Zucc...
Squash and Zucchini have a male and a female flower pod. One is has a ball under it, and the other is just a stem.

The bees have to go from one flower to the other, so that pollution will happen. Once pollination occurs, the ball turns into a squash or zucchini.

Maybe your plants were not getting pollinated properly? Did you use pesticides on your squash or zucchini? If so, that might have played factor in it.

example picture of a zucchini plant I grew a couple of years ago

 

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no chems of any sorts.
maybe the bees liked the male squash pollen and the female squash flowers?
i dont know what happened except cross polination and i ended up with 4 yellow squash a day for 2 months.
 

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no chems of any sorts.
maybe the bees liked the male squash pollen and the female squash flowers?
i dont know what happened except cross polination and i ended up with 4 yellow squash a day for 2 months.
Cross pollination would not affect the current fruit, Unless it's something like a grain where seeds are the fruit, either you or the seed company screwed up. I grow zucchini and yellow squash in the same garden square every year and I get zucchini and yellow squash.
 

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hmmm i dont get it then.. i would have thought it was the seeds but i gave the seeds to my neighbor and he got zucc's/.//
if a squash pollen gets on a zucc flower your saying it wont turn to a squash?
 

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hmmm i dont get it then.. i would have thought it was the seeds but i gave the seeds to my neighbor and he got zucc's/.//
if a squash pollen gets on a zucc flower your saying it wont turn to a squash?
That's right, but the seeds will grow something weird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
if a squash pollen gets on a zucc flower your saying it wont turn to a squash?
If squash and zucchini cross pollinate, instead of being solid yellow or green, it will have strips of yellow and green running through it. Its kind of funny looking.
 

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If squash and zucchini cross pollinate, instead of being solid yellow or green, it will have strips of yellow and green running through it. Its kind of funny looking.
Will the offspring of the zuc/squash breed true? And how does it taste?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Will the offspring of the zuc/squash breed true? And how does it taste?
I dont know what the seeds would do if they were planted. I'am going to guess they would be like a hybrid.

They taste like squash or zucchhini
 
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