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I Don't Even Go Here
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Hi all, I'm going to attempt to start a garden this year and I'd like to start of with potatoes. I'm almost completely new to the idea of gardening other than watering my mum's garden a couple of years ago, but that went down the drain with the introduction of caterpillars into the lettuce plants.

I live in the Midwest, Eastern Kansas to be exact. Is there any specific strain of potato that does well in this climate, or does anyone that lives in a similar climate have any experience to be shared? Any overall potato advice?

Also, will my garden suffer if I plant potatoes in the same space for the coming years? Should I switch between vegetables over periods of time?

Thanks for reading, and thanks for the help.
 

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i like yukon golds ,,,both the taste and they seem to keep longer than others ,,,i grow 3 types tho ,,,a red a white and golds,,,hoping if a blight hits one will be resitant,,thats what got the irish they all grew the same spud

if at all possable rotate your crops ,,,that being said i have grown potatoes in the same spot for a couple years and it didnt seem to hurt them ,,,i mulched the ground pretty heavy to increase the humas content and helps to fertalize the ground as it breaks down,,,i use grass clippings
 

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<--My Faverolle Chicken
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I've been looking into growing potatoes in straw.
http://www.bettervegetablegardening.com/growing-potatoes-in-straw.html

I did them in 5 gal buckets last year and they did OK. I think the soil was a little heavy so they didn't get very big. We also had a couple of weeks 100+ deg weather which probably didn't help either. The straw seems to be a pretty good way when it comes to harvest time no heavy digging or bruising the tubers.
 

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Also, will my garden suffer if I plant potatoes in the same space for the coming years? Should I switch between vegetables over periods of time?
Season 1 (spring) - potatoes
Season 2 (fall) - peas, snap beans
Season 3 (spring following year) - corn or something like okra. Okra is a hot weather crop. Here in southeast Texas its usually May before I plant okra.

Or, plant peas and corn at the same time during season 2.

Season 4 & 5 - rest, plant clover, haul in manure, compost,,,.

By planting different types of crops you are using different nutrients from the soil.

Peas and beans use nutrients that potatoes do not. Peas and beans add nitrogen back to the soil, which is used by crops that need nitrogen the next season.

Let the garden sit for a season, or a year, add compost, haul in some manure, plant clover,,, something that adds nutrients back to the soil.
 

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We like the red potatoes. Start them and add dirt or composts as they develop. They don't spoil as quickly as the baking variety. We put them on cardboard down in the basement they last all year.

If you get potato blite don't put them in the same spot.
 

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the "d" from ban[d]
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Season 1 (spring) - potatoes
Season 2 (fall) - peas, snap beans
Season 3 (spring following year) - corn or something like okra. Okra is a hot weather crop. Here in southeast Texas its usually May before I plant okra.

Or, plant peas and corn at the same time during season 2.

Season 4 & 5 - rest, plant clover, haul in manure, compost,,,.

By planting different types of crops you are using different nutrients from the soil.

Peas and beans use nutrients that potatoes do not. Peas and beans add nitrogen back to the soil, which is used by crops that need nitrogen the next season.

Let the garden sit for a season, or a year, add compost, haul in some manure, plant clover,,, something that adds nutrients back to the soil.

Good it has been years since I gave crop rotation a second thought.
 

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Don't plant where you've mixed fresh manure in the soil or your spuds will have scabs.
If you end up with the potatoe beetle they lay eggs on the underside of the leaves of the plant and when the larva hatch they eat the leaves, then drop into the soil to come back the next year. You'd want to plant in a different area the next year then.
 

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I started potatoes last year. I put a few red potatoes in a giant pot and just let them do their thing. They came out ok, but were small. This year, I plan to make some good sized mounds and build "containers," with a circle of solid sticks and grape vines woven around them to hold the dirt in. There's no bottom, so whatever you plant has direct access to the soil below.

I have heard that it's good to rotate, but don't know if that's true or not... however, changing some plants around can help to keep your soil balanced.

Good luck with your potatoes!
 
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