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Just wondering if anyone has thought of "rabies" as a possible concern for post SHTF? I know that they have a vaccine for this, but does anyone have it it their supplies?
 

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No I don't have any vaccines.

Those things seem to be no fun by the way. I've heard the vaccine can make you pretty ill for a few weeks.

I think 223 (and maybe birdshot) is a pretty good medicine for the source of the problem.
 

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Apocaloptimist
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Shoot all unknown dogs, oppossums, racoons, etc. on sight. In a SHTF situation, vaccines will run out quick and likely not be replenished.
 

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i had been vacinated when i was in hs cause i worked at an animal hosp and they suck they have long worn off now

but from my understanding of the virus is that if you cook it through it will kill the virus as its intolerant of heat so just make sure you dont get bit or scratched by the critter or get blood into cuts ect
 
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Luckily so far, we dont have it here in the Uk, by the strict control of our sea boarders etc. Hopefully after the SHTF, unless someone is extremely stupid it should remain that way.
 

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Many cats and dogs have been immunized against rabies, so at least for a while it wouldn't be much of a problem among those populations. Wilder animals might have it, but it's not very prevalent now, that probably wouldn't change much after a TEOTWAWKI event. Any animal acting strange or unusually aggressive would have to be shot for safety's sake.
 

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HA! Rabies is a concern no matter what is going on much less post-SHTF.

That being said we do an excellent job of eliminating Rabies in the U.S. of the minuscule amount of animals that do have rabies are not likely to spread it very fast.

Best plan of action Post SHTF shoot any critter that is not yours that acts aggressively towards you.
 

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Luckily so far, we dont have it here in the Uk, by the strict control of our sea boarders etc. Hopefully after the SHTF, unless someone is extremely stupid it should remain that way.
Rabies has come into the UK via bats as well as stupid people who flaunt the laws and smiggle little fluffy back into the country. The biggest threat would be a prolong period of no power which would allow criters to enter the UK from the Euro rail tunnel.

Can rats and mice carry Rabies?
 

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Many cats and dogs have been immunized against rabies, so at least for a while it wouldn't be much of a problem among those populations. Wilder animals might have it, but it's not very prevalent now, that probably wouldn't change much after a TEOTWAWKI event. Any animal acting strange or unusually aggressive would have to be shot for safety's sake.
That won't last long...bats, raccoons, and rats are common carriers and often bite domesticated animals. After the first litters of puppies/kittens are born, this will start being a major problem.
 

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That won't last long...bats, raccoons, and rats are common carriers and often bite domesticated animals. After the first litters of puppies/kittens are born, this will start being a major problem.
most peoples pets cant reproduce
 

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One of those "life after mankind" shows talked about dogs, and the role that rabies will play. They said that rabies was going to run rampant. But I think its going to take years for rabies to make a rebound.

Lets take Texas as an example:

DSHS does rabies vaccine air drops in parts of Texas where rabies has been reported. A rabies vaccine pill is wrapped in meat, and then dropped across a given area. Source - http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/20090106.shtm

Most responsible pet owners have their dogs vaccinated against rabies.

The Texas DSHS recommends:
Impoundment and elimination of all stray dogs: This program requires suitable impoundment quarters, and facilities for the humane destruction of unwanted animals. Trained animal control personnel are also necessary.
Source - http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/rabies/information/facts/

Its gotten to the point where animal bites, and suspected rabies cases is rare. Around here, the local hospitals and health department do not even keep rabies shots in stock. If your bitten by an animal, and rabies is suspected, the treatment shots have to be shipped from over 100 miles away to Jasper, Texas. I think they have to come from either Houston or Tyler, Texas.

My opinion, its going to take rabies a long time to make a recovery to where its a problem again. But once it does make a recovery, its going to be here to stay.

That won't last long...bats, raccoons, and rats are common carriers and often bite domesticated animals. After the first litters of puppies/kittens are born, this will start being a major problem.
Bats - yes
Raccoons - yes, maybe
Rats - No.

The bodies of rats are so small and compact, that any serious bite is going to be lethal anyway. Its doubtful that a rat is going to survive an attack from a fox, skunk, or raccoon, live long enough to develop rabies, then bite something else. Chances are the bite is going to be so severe, important internal organs will be damaged, or the rat will die of a common bacterial infection, or bleed to death.

The most common sources of rabies transmission are foxes and skunks, source - http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/rabies/information/facts/

A common distribution pattern is for a rabid skunk or fox to bite and infect one or more dogs or cats during a fearless invasion into a community.
 

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Sugar-free
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Rabies will be a major concern post SHTF. I am vaccinated now, but that will be worn off in few years. Humans will just have to be EXTREMELY careful around all warm-blooded animals, and dogs will have to be shot on sight. Even so, rabies will probably still be a major threat. There simply won't be any more vaccine.
 

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I was charged by a rabid coyote while hunting Patoka Lake State Park. I had just shot at a deer when it came out of some brush 35' from me. It was snarling and started to run at me. Here I was standing there with a 45/70 TC with a spent round in the chamber with gloves on. I bit the glove on my right hand pulling it off while breaking the gun open with the left. I kept a loaded round in the wristband of my left glove so after pulling out the empty I replaced it and swung it up to meet the thing and pulled the trigger. It was only 4 foot from me.

I now carry a multi shot handgun while in the woods no mater what.

By the way, I may have missed but with the muzzle blast it ran off. Never even thought to look for blood.
The incident was witnessed by a Indiana DNR empolyee that was hunting in a stand within view. The next year the law was changed so that a person with a CC permit could carry while hunting.

Pucker factor of 5 while it happened maybe a 7 afterward while talking it over with the DNR employee and I started thinking about the shots I would have had to endure.
Point is it happens fast.
 

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Survive,
Thanks for bringing this up. I think rabies could be a problem in a prolonged event. There will undoubtedly be more contact between wild, infected animals and pets and humans. Unfortunately there is little to be done for an infected person or pet.

As others have said here, it would be best to shoot any unknown and especially aggressive animal.

Wild animals accounted for 93 percent of reported cases of rabies in 2001. The wild animals in which rabies was reported included:

* Raccoons (37.2 percent of all animal cases during 2001)
* Skunks (30.7 percent)
* Bats (17.2 percent)
* Foxes (5.9 percent)
* Other wild animals, including rodents and lagomorphs (0.7 percent).
Lagomorphs was a new one to me. They are rabbits and hares.
 

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I have control issues
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Rabies will indeed be a concern post-SHTF. Some areas have more problems with it than others, due to population density of the local wildlife. When I worked at the vet clinic on base overseas, I had to get an annual rabies vaccine, as part of my job entailed packaging (in dry ice into a styrofoam cooler that was placed in a strapped-down red carrier with rabies warnings in FOUR languages) and shipping suspected rabies carriers to the Army lab at Landstuhl :eek:

Since the (injectable) vaccine needs to be kept refrigerated until used (the oral vaccine may be different), and used within a certain period, it would not be long until rabies once again reared its ugly head. Outbreaks of the disease seeme to come in cycles, by the way.
 

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* Raccoons (37.2 percent of all animal cases during 2001)
* Skunks (30.7 percent)
* Bats (17.2 percent)
* Foxes (5.9 percent)
* Other wild animals, including rodents and lagomorphs (0.7 percent)

If you take a look at that chart (except for bats) - the larger the animal, the better its chances of living through the initial attack, and then developing rabies.

Raccoons - the largest of the listed animals has the highest rate. Raccoons also have the ability to climb a tree once the attack starts. This provides the animal a way to retreat away from its attacker, leaving it wounded, but still alive.

While the smallest and weakest animals - rats, rodents, rabbits,,, have the lowest rates. Probably because they die from the initial attack.
 

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If you take a look at that chart (except for bats) - the larger the animal, the better its chances of living through the initial attack, and then developing rabies.

Raccoons - the largest of the listed animals has the highest rate. Raccoons also have the ability to climb a tree once the attack starts. This provides the animal a way to retreat away from its attacker, leaving it wounded, but still alive.

While the smallest and weakest animals - rats, rodents, rabbits,,, have the lowest rates. Probably because they die from the initial attack.
great correlation
 

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Just wondering if anyone has thought of "rabies" as a possible concern for post SHTF? I know that they have a vaccine for this, but does anyone have it it their supplies?
If you find a way to get this vaccine let me know. My wife works as a Vet Tech and has found it impossible to get unless the vet hospital she works for sponsors vaccinations for all employees.
 

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rats, mice ,possums, and rabbits very rarely get rabies, something 'bout not much saliva and body temperatures being high or low for the virus to thrive in.
 

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grease monkey
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Somebody watched "I am Legend" today! I really don't think we could have an "outbreak", but it would run rampant amongst all of the "pets" and other animals that are left behind when the SHTF. People have no respect for living things, and even now, will just leave their dogs or cats behind when they move. I deal with abandoned animals all the time. I am the self proclaimed "animal control" for my area. People always bring them to me, because they know how I am, and I eventually find homes for ALL of them. Not that hard. I don't think it would be too major of a concern for humans.
 
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