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ZRT Ready
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507 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Ive been looking into picking up a dutch oven for cooking. I was wondering how many of you have made this a part of your bug out / bug in cookware? I know that they will last forever (properly cared for) but they add a lot of weight to a bag.

Im also wondering how would you bake in a post-SHTF event when electricity is out (or propane is low/out). Ive been looking for various baking ideas (so you can bake bread, etc) without the use of an actual oven. I have found several recipes for baking bread in a dutch oven (among other things), but Im just curious about how practical that is.
:thumb:
 

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Homesteader
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1,222 Posts
A dutch oven is very versatile, and can do bread, stew, soup, desserts[fruit cobbler yum] what ever your imagination can think of. They are very heavy, so not for backpack use.

There was a guy who had a cooking show on PBS that did camp cooking with dutch ovens, and he was amazing. I bet you could find him on yuotube. Good luck!
 

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ZRT Ready
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507 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
A dutch oven is very versatile, and can do bread, stew, soup, desserts[fruit cobbler yum] what ever your imagination can think of. They are very heavy, so not for backpack use.

There was a guy who had a cooking show on PBS that did camp cooking with dutch ovens, and he was amazing. I bet you could find him on yuotube. Good luck!
Ive found many recipes that are for dutch oven. Thats what I like about it, its versatile. My current plan is to bug in for as long as I can, but if I have to bug out, I suppose that the DO will be coming along :D:

I like that you can do so much with it, as long as you have a fire to heat it. I know that keeping them clean and rust free is also an issue, which is a sort of drawback for SHTF moments. Maybe Ill end up with a couple so I can make a stew and dessert in the same evening....

Rule #32: enjoy the little things.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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We've had quite a few threads on dutch oven cooking, so I'd say that a lot of us have them. I've collected cast iron of all sorts for about 20 years now. Dutch ovens especially. They're great for camping and I love cooking in them, but I still need a bit more practice for some things like biscuits and deserts.

While I'll pick up any good piece of cast iron that's cheap and in good condition, I try to collect Griswold. That stuff is amazingly well made. Kinda hard to find though. I find it at gun shows occasionally.
 

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ZRT Ready
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507 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
We've had quite a few threads on dutch oven cooking, so I'd say that a lot of us have them. I've collected cast iron of all sorts for about 20 years now. Dutch ovens especially. They're great for camping and I love cooking in them, but I still need a bit more practice for some things like biscuits and deserts.

While I'll pick up any good piece of cast iron that's cheap and in good condition, I try to collect Griswold. That stuff is amazingly well made. Kinda hard to find though. I find it at gun shows occasionally.
I tried to search out dutch ovens before starting a new thread, but for some reason I couldnt get the search feature to work... not sure why. Most likely, user error.

Anyway, Ive heard that it takes practice to learn how to perfect DO cooking. What Im curious about is can I use my camping DO (they have the legs on them) in a conventional oven as well? Id like to make soups, stews, etc., in my oven in the colder months (or just in general when not vehicle camping).

Cast iron is making a resurgence in my area for cooking (thanks Food Network), so finding them at yard sales is getting harder and harder. Lodge Logic isnt far from me and they have a storefront. I'll be paying them a visit soon. We all spend so much time talking about preps, but I rarely talk to anyone about how to prepare the food we store :D:
 

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Tempered by Adversity
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102 Posts
I've never really owned a Dutch Oven, but I've had the same Pokie (South African version of a Dutch Oven) for the past 10 years. I wouldn't trade it for anything. Dutch Oven truly are one of the most versatile items you can have in your camping/kitchen supplies. A good piece of cast iron will outlast you and can be everything from a saute pan to a baking oven.
 

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ZRT Ready
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507 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I've never really owned a Dutch Oven, but I've had the same Pokie (South African version of a Dutch Oven) for the past 10 years. I wouldn't trade it for anything. Dutch Oven truly are one of the most versatile items you can have in your camping/kitchen supplies. A good piece of cast iron will outlast you and can be everything from a saute pan to a baking oven.
Thats what got me into looking at them. They are versatile, so if I could only grab one kitchen item on my way out, I want it to be the most versatile one I could get my hand on.... a dutch oven seems perfect. A lot of my food preps would be great for a one pot dinner. Something tells me that beans and rice would be awesome from a dutch oven. But, then again, I actually like beans and rice :D:

On a side note, has anyone ever used their camping dutch oven (has 3 legs) in their oven at home?
 

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Tempered by Adversity
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Yes Sir, I have indeed. Not highly recommended, but you can make it work. Best tips I can say is low and slow on the heat. You'd be surprised how much carry over heat those suckers have when every part has the same amount of heat pounding it. Placing it on a sturdy sheet pan will keep it from tipping over.

The three leg Dutch Oven is extremely similar to the Pokie I have in my kitchen.
 

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ZRT Ready
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Discussion Starter #10
Yes Sir, I have indeed. Not highly recommended, but you can make it work. Best tips I can say is low and slow on the heat. You'd be surprised how much carry over heat those suckers have when every part has the same amount of heat pounding it. Placing it on a sturdy sheet pan will keep it from tipping over.

The three leg Dutch Oven is extremely similar to the Pokie I have in my kitchen.
Maybe Ill get two. One for the oven and one for the campfire. Im wanting to make bread with mine along with soups, but most of my cooking will be done at home (unless SHTF, of course, and the power goes out).
 

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Future Codgers of America
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218 Posts
We've had quite a few threads on dutch oven cooking, so I'd say that a lot of us have them. I've collected cast iron of all sorts for about 20 years now. Dutch ovens especially. They're great for camping and I love cooking in them, but I still need a bit more practice for some things like biscuits and deserts.

While I'll pick up any good piece of cast iron that's cheap and in good condition, I try to collect Griswold. That stuff is amazingly well made. Kinda hard to find though. I find it at gun shows occasionally.
Yeah, I have three different size Dutch ovens and I went yard sale-ing last week and found a guy clearing out his garage/shop and got about 22 or 23 pieces of cast iron, skillets in various sizes, lids etc. for $40. It has a lot of rust but I have an excess of elbow grease. :D: Also last year I found my favorite piece of cast iron on Ebay. It's shaped like Texas.

On a different note. I have considered, at least a temporary answer to oven cooking, using a smoker with a side fire box but not removing the knock out between them like I normally would to keep the smoke out of the grill part. Not sure how hot it would get though. Gives me something to play with I guess.

+N
 

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ZRT Ready
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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, I have three different size Dutch ovens and I went yard sale-ing last week and found a guy clearing out his garage/shop and got about 22 or 23 pieces of cast iron, skillets in various sizes, lids etc. for $40. It has a lot of rust but I have an excess of elbow grease. :D: Also last year I found my favorite piece of cast iron on Ebay. It's shaped like Texas.

On a different note. I have considered, at least a temporary answer to oven cooking, using a smoker with a side fire box but not removing the knock out between them like I normally would to keep the smoke out of the grill part. Not sure how hot it would get though. Gives me something to play with I guess.

+N
I would think that it wouldnt go very far. The smoker is meant to draw air through it, which is why (at least it should be) the smoke stack is on the far end of the barrel from the firebox. If you somehow manage to get a seal from firebox to barrel, you wouldnt be cooking at all... the barrel (chamber) has to be filled with smoke, which does the cooking. The temperature is regulated by how much smoke is pulled through the chamber and out the smoke stack.
 

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Future Codgers of America
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218 Posts
I would think that it wouldnt go very far. The smoker is meant to draw air through it, which is why (at least it should be) the smoke stack is on the far end of the barrel from the firebox. If you somehow manage to get a seal from firebox to barrel, you wouldnt be cooking at all... the barrel (chamber) has to be filled with smoke, which does the cooking. The temperature is regulated by how much smoke is pulled through the chamber and out the smoke stack.
Actually the Char-Griller model I'm thinking of uses a miniature grill which can be used alone as a grill or the side fire box. I already have one. I had to purchase the two pieces separately. I already considered adding a chimney to the fire box in order to accommodate draft needs.

Also the smoke is what does the smoking...it's the fire in the fire box that does the cooking. The way I see it it would work on the same (basic) principle as an old fashioned kitchen wood burning stove. All those are are a cooking area (oven) heated by a firebox. They are kept separate and the fire box is vented outside.

The Char-Griller version would simply be a muuuuuuch cheaper version. Did I mention temporary :D:

+N
 

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Another option is what is called a camp fire pit with baking shelf, then use regular baking pans. Not sure how to get a good picture in for you..
Looks something like this:
Code:
  |    ___|   Fire in the lower part and the shelf is were the
  |___|         baking pan goes

Oven for over stove or fire.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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67,419 Posts
Anyway, Ive heard that it takes practice to learn how to perfect DO cooking. What Im curious about is can I use my camping DO (they have the legs on them) in a conventional oven as well? Id like to make soups, stews, etc., in my oven in the colder months (or just in general when not vehicle camping).
It does take practice. Studying technique helps reduce that somewhat. I was just starting to get good at it. I was hoping to get into competitions some day. But my situation changed and I don't find myself cooking in them much anymore.

You can use your DO in a regular oven but the results aren't much different than using any other pot really, other than they do provide really even heat to the food.

Yeah, I have three different size Dutch ovens and I went yard sale-ing last week and found a guy clearing out his garage/shop and got about 22 or 23 pieces of cast iron, skillets in various sizes, lids etc. for $40. It has a lot of rust but I have an excess of elbow grease. :D: Also last year I found my favorite piece of cast iron on Ebay. It's shaped like Texas.
That's an amazing haul! :thumb:
 

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I have a great cookbook for a DO from Marlboro! Bought an oven and I use it in the oven for chicken and it is FREAKING AWESOME!!!!! This summer I will be taking it to the cabin and try cooking over a fire...who knows if it will work but it will be fun to try.
 
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