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If this is true it is a game changer. Health officials have been saying up to a 14 day incubation period, but now there are cases showing possible 24 day incubation period.

https://www.businessinsider.com/wuhan-coronavirus-symptoms-24-days-after-infection-2020-2

"Every day there are new estimates coming out for the incubation period," Lauren Ancel Meyers, a professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas at Austin, told Business Insider.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coronavirus' incubation period is believed to be two to 14 days.

But a study of six family members infected with the virus, published Friday in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), revealed that one patient's incubation period was 19 days long.

Zhong Nanshan, who discovered the SARS virus, published research on February 6 that suggested the coronavirus incubation period could be up to 24 days. That study has not yet been peer-reviewed, however.
Three week incubation period. I guess the big question is how long is someone infectious before symptoms appear? If someone is infectious for a week, two weeks, they could infect dozens, maybe hundreds of people?

There are more and more questions, and fewer answers.
 

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This is being discussed in a couple of the other threads. This is indeed a game changer. That means any number of things including:

1.) the incubation period varies based on the health of the host
2.) the virus is is possibly mutating the result which is a longer incubation period

What the hell did the Chinese develop?
 

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Prepared - 7.5ⓖ
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I go back to what I thought during Ebola...
The prudent path is to assume that the patient is infectious at day 0-1. It's the means of infection that will vary over the timeline. Meaning, in those early days, expect core bodily fluids to get it - blood, probably 'intimate' fluids, maybe even breast milk. I think the mean transmission numbers we see are where the saliva, sweat, vomit, stool etc become loaded to the point where the patient would be considered actively shedding viral loads in copious amounts (plus that's what alot of those fluids do). Likewise, once the big viral fireworks have passed and the body releases copious antibodies, that load begins to taper down. Is it gone at day 21? I don't believe so. Studies have shown presence in semen way longer, so my takeaway is that there's reserves in bodily fluids that tend to be 'stored' (like semen) vs renewed (like sweat/saliva). This would help explain the CDC guidelines about caregivers and 'direct contact' - more difficult to be infected in early/late symptom presentation, but still possible. And therein lies my issue with the guidance - it's based on probability and not science. It's a dangerous path the CDC is leading folks down. Of course they left themselves an escape route - "the virus must have changed".
Why should this be any different?
 

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reluctant sinner
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Who is to say there aren't new "agents" being released?

What if it turns out "it" can spread from food processing by infected people - Salmonella or E-coli style for example.

In the game of nukes First Strike is an option. Wasn't New York bombed to make up for accidental destruction of Moscow in the movie FailSafe?

Nukes, germs, chemicals like botulism toxin in the water supply - its all the same to the NWO agenda - reduce the population by any means - even better if the kill each other.
 
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