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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are you carrying in your vehicle for unexpected flats?

Obviously a spare and tools. Do you have a portable inflator you could recommend. I just picked up an American made plug and tool kit to replace the chinawain walmart junk I had to have last night, luckily I was at the house with a flat.



Been looking at something like this for $60.00


American made plug set,$43.00. I had these tools for 20 plus years and they have apparently wondered off since my boy started driving.


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Buy a can of glue for your plug kit - those little tubes dry out soon when you open the inner seal.
Get the 4 way valve tool and some extra valves. Use plastic dust caps - metal one rust on.

Zutozone has all that stuff.
Keep the plugs in a sealed baggie. Some of these air pumps don't have the ass to make it to 65/75 pounds, truck tires. Check yours and make sure it will pump to higher pressures.

I carry this. 5.65 CFM Air Compressor - 2781 - Smittybilt
 

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Since I already have a bunch of Rigid stuff and a ton of batteries, I went with their 18v inflator. It works great and is very portable. I also have a Senco which I keep out on the patio for other things. It runs on 110v.

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I do a bit of off roading and recovery, we are always airing up or down. I should have on board air and a 4 way hose. But I have the big Smitibilt portable that @saln linked. It'll take 33's from 10 to 40 lbs in about a minute. If you have a 12 v compressor get a good one, out in the boonies is not the place for it to die on you.

The new Fords have 2000 watt inverters, enough to run a regular compressor. I will eventually go that route I think.
 

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I had a mechanic replace my brakes and forgot to put in a bolt on the caliper. Well, 400+ miles from home is shifts and starts dragging on the alloy rim and then it caught and sheared off the remaining bolt. It wore a hole in the rim as the tire went around the 1/4 mile to safely stop. Spare tire was inflated properly but the cable was rusted in place. The 12 volt inflator is rated to inflate to 125psi. I can’t remember the brand. Well I inflated to 80psi and stopped to refill at 35 psi. (Truck tire) It deflated that much in about 150 miles.
Also have some soccer, basketballs, and footballs. No fun to bounce a flat basketball.


TLDR: Everyone should have a tire inflator in the car
 

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I bought the Ryobi inflator a while back. Used it many times. It does have a hair trigger. Barely touch it and it's on.

 

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I bought the Ryobi inflator a while back. Used it many times. It does have a hair trigger. Barely touch it and it's on.

Same,learned quick to not leave the battery in while in the trunk.Short hose,have a rubber band on the handle so don't have to bend over holding the trigger.It would add 30 cents to add a on/off lock or switch,but whatever.
 

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I used to have a regularly leaky tire (something with the nozzle) and about every 10 days the pressure sensor would go off, and it would be down to 26lbs.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07VMM69N9/ $32. It also has a light on the front of it which comes in handy when you're doing it at 5am.

This thing was awesome! You can actually have it set for what you want it at, and then all you have to do is plug it into your cigarette lighter, turn it on, and it will inflate it to what you had it set for and turn off. You only have to set it once - it will remember.
 

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We have basically the same products pictured in the op. Add a headlamp and LED flares/strobes.
AAA emergency roadside service is free with our insurance bundle and our next door neighbor is a mobile mechanic. Those have both come in handy.
 

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My Viair 88P compressor https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ASY23I/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1 that clips on my battery has saved me a few times! I returned to my truck at the airport during a snow storm to find I’d picked up a chunk of steel in one of my tires!

Instead of changing the tire in the snow late at night in the airport parking lot with a couple travel weary children and a wife that was past ready to be home, I hit it with the pump while I cleaned off the windows and warmed up the truck and headed for the house!

The next morning I hit it with air again and let the tire shop fix it! Now I have absolutely been saved by plugs before and likely will be again, but sometimes hitting it with air and driving home is the correct answer!

SD
 

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I use a ARB twin compressor that is a dedicated onboard air system. I also have a portable compressor from Viair. I also run 35" tires and commonly air them down and back up along with air locking differentials so they see a lot of use. If you are not going to have a dedicated air source I would recommend staying away from the cigarette lighter types of compressors. They work in a pinch but are prone to failure due to overheating and have minimal output. If you have a small wheel on a passenger car is about the only application they are rated for. Stick with the direct output 12v from your starting battery in the vehicle units.

Keep in mind that while having a compressor is a great idea a complete tire repair kit with quick valve stem replacements should be tossed into the fray and the knowledge how to use them. If you put together your own kit they are not costly at all and will help you get out of a sticky situation. This is a great thread as many people far too often neglect their tires and the undersides of their vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I ended up ordering the viair 88p and a NOCO GBX55ss 1750 amp battery booster along with a plug and tool kit. Probably going to order a Rothco canvas bag for it all. A grab and go for any vehicle I'm in. Just as important as the first aid kit.

With hunting season coming on, I'll be 20-40 miles from home in the middle of nowhere. I always send a map screenshot of where I'll be, but doubt my wife could find me.


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One thing that a lot of off roaders forget about, are the tire valve stems. The actual part that sticks out of the rim and has the little valve inside. Usually, they're made out of rubber but sometimes, it's metal. Regardless of what they're made of, they're always fragile. I prefer the rubber ones because when they rip out, they just pop out or rip in half. The metal ones damage the rim on the way out. Most of the time, they get damaged and leak bad.

I drive a (sometimes it drives me!) modified for trail use street legal sand rail. My Wife and I like to explore old mining trails and areas and do wildlife photography. Sometimes, we're so far out in the boony's that its a long hike up a mountain just to get cell reception. My Rail has a hyped up Ford V6 engine that self identifies as a Ferrari V12. It likes to go fast. Honest Ossifer! Dragging a rim over a pile of loose boulders and ripping the stem out is a real possibility. I don't want to break down but if I do, I'd like to be able to fix it on the trail. I carry a lot of emergency gear on board including several packs of these things.

Field-Replaceable Valve Stem for Overlanding

I have not ever used them so I don't have any first hand knowledge on how they work. They seem rugged and the idea is right so it should work as advertised. Plus, they have some really good reviews. I bought a few packs.
 
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