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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if the polymer/plastic used in modern pistols like glocks or springfield xd's break down after long duration constant exposure to motor oil?

Thanks!
 

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Third World'er Lunatic
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I keep probably one of the most re-viled pistols in my toolbox at the shop, a older Kel-tec p-40, after i worked the trigger and did a lil slide work it has never missed a beat in gods, must be 15,20 years, from oily hands, to dropped in a drain pan, to bouncing around on various vehicles, that early cheap polymer has never missed a stroke. and that firearm has never had a break or a easy day.
 

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Pot-stirring nest-poker!
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Lowers made of dark chocolate don't seem to fare well. Poly lowers seem fine. My M&P 15-22 has 4,000 rounds through it, and that thing is made entirely of plastic. I use Mobil 1 liberally on all of my guns. Maybe too liberally. :thumb:
 

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Mobil one for my polymer guns also. And all the others as well. I also dunk in kerosene as well when a deep cleaning is called for. Take care of your firearms and they will outlast you.
The only parts of a glock you might have problems with are the magazines. They use a different polymer on them than what's used on the frame. No k dunking and when they are cleaned it's with warm soapy water, rinsed and dried with a towel. (Disassembled first)
Glock armorer for years, still certified. I have personally run abuse tests on a 23 and have been impressed by the ability to keep shooting in the dirtiest conditions. Glocks are almost idiot proof, that's why cops carry them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Basically i am thinking of taking some pistols, cleaning them good, and putting them in an ammo can filled with motor oil to preserve them until needed. But i got to thinking whether this constant exposure would degrade or eat away the polymer ones. Not sure i want to open them in 20 years and find a beautiful metal upper with a bunch of springs and pins connected to a molten glob of polymer lower. This would basically be the pistol sitting in motor oil for years.
 

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WINNING...humbly
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Basically i am thinking of taking some pistols, cleaning them good, and putting them in an ammo can filled with motor oil to preserve them until needed. But i got to thinking whether this constant exposure would degrade or eat away the polymer ones. Not sure i want to open them in 20 years and find a beautiful metal upper with a bunch of springs and pins connected to a molten glob of polymer lower. This would basically be the pistol sitting in motor oil for years.
I wouldn't do it. The reason is that with the striker fired pistols you have to keep the firing pin channel clean and dry in order to function properly. If the oil gets in the channel then you may have a very hard time to remove it if the oil gets congealed.
 

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I love this *****
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I change the oil in my Glock every 3000 miles.

But seriously, I've never brought any of my guns into contact with motor oil. Not sure if it's a good idea or at all necessary.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
I wouldn't do it. The reason is that with the striker fired pistols you have to keep the firing pin channel clean and dry in order to function properly. If the oil gets in the channel then you may have a very hard time to remove it if the oil gets congealed.
I didn't know that, excellent point.
 

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Militant Normal
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Speaking as a retired automotive engineer - - - There are quite a few parts inside your car's engine that are one sort of polymer or another. Running bathed in oil, and hot oil at that.

Much as I dislike plastic pistols esthetically, I seriously doubt that any gun designer would choose a polymer that would be weakened or swollen by motor oil.
 

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I would think for long term storage, break it down and store the individual parts in their own ziplock bags with a light coat of oil on them in an ammo can. I would imagine that would be sufficient but that is just my thoughts

This pretty much sums it up. Why do the guns need to be submerged? Just bag them with a good grease and there you go.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This pretty much sums it up. Why do the guns need to be submerged? Just bag them with a good grease and there you go.
My thinking is that it would be more foolproof as far as lessening the chances of rust if I wanted to bury the ammo cans.

Since my climate is snow in the winter and they would not be buried below the frost line there would potentially be condensation during the freeze/thaw cycle in any air space in the container.

I buried some surplus tokarovs that I didn't have to worry about polymers quite awhile back.

The technique for that was to get the gun sopping wet with motor oil, wrap the gun in a thick rag, soak the rag, and then sealed that in a mylar pouch before putting it (and other supplies) in an ammo can that was then painted with a thick coat of bed liner. Those I have less to worry about I think.

Maybe I'm overthinking this!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Lowers made of dark chocolate don't seem to fare well. Poly lowers seem fine. My M&P 15-22 has 4,000 rounds through it, and that thing is made entirely of plastic. I use Mobil 1 liberally on all of my guns. Maybe too liberally. :thumb:
What do you mean by dark chocolate, not sure I have heard that term in relation to firearms?
 
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