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Sheepdog
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Discussion Starter #1
You can buy plastic septic tanks and water tanks relatively cheaply. This got me thinking....If you took a large tank, put it in a trench then poured concrete over the top of it, how do you think that would work for a storm shelter, underground storage location, etc.? I would imagine attaching ventilation pipes, water pipes and things like that would not be too hard to do.

I found this one doing a quick search online:


Capacity:1700 Gallon Water Cistern Tanks
Size: 137"L x 58"W x 72"H
USD Price: 1169.97

13 feet long by almost 5 feet wide and 6 feet tall.
 

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I,ve thought about that before, i,am sure it could be done. Ya would need at least three one for living, one for storage and fill one up with water. Food ya can do with out, water is something else. Yes it could be done. I,am leaning toward metal pipe. four 20'. A lot higher in price though. Told my daughter i was gona build her a house on one, i said the bottom will be totally self sufficient with a top floor or above ground house, she said great. Now i,ve gota sit down and look at the ground lay out i do have a great building site, very lucky on that. I hope i have enough time for her and my granddaughter ta get it done right for them.
 

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Look into a tornado shelter. Make sure your ventilation is adaquate. Pack dirt around walls. Wouldn't think a cement top would be necessary. Cement tornado shelters are probably about the same price as plastic. Let the grass grow over it.
 

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I think with the plastic shelter you would have problems with water vapor condensing on the walls and everywhere else. Underground it would be cool, and moist, a great place to grow mold. So you would have to have constant air exchange going on.

I even have problems with condensation in cool weather, camping alone in a 3 man tent!
 

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somewhere in Helvetistan
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I think with the plastic shelter you would have problems with water vapor condensing on the walls and everywhere else. Underground it would be cool, and moist, a great place to grow mold. So you would have to have constant air exchange going on.

I even have problems with condensation in cool weather, camping alone in a 3 man tent!

this tank is a great idea and it almost looks like a closed lifeboat. since it's plastic, it should be easy to clean away the molds from the walls. for the items stored inside however, it's a different story; might have to put everything in airtight plastic containers and add silica balls to keep the contents dry. it will of course be also quite slippery inside, when wet due to condensation.
 

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Sheepdog
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Discussion Starter #7
Didn't think about condensation....what about spraying the outside of it with foam insulation, then a quick coating of concrete covered with dirt? Or could go real high tech, put a dehumidifier in it with one of the small pumps to empty it. This would work until extended power outages..... or, figure out a way to have some flow through ventilation in it. Maybe one of those wind driven turban (not turbine) fans like you see on the roof of barns.
 

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Not a good idea!!

You really should fill those tanks with water before you backfill them, or they may cave in!
Once the fill has settled around them they are safe to drain, assuming you don’t have to much weight on top. I don’t think it would be wise to “pour concrete over the top.”
You might get away with burying one, grading the area over it flat and then pouring a reinforced slab on that..
Best of all – Use ‘em to store water!
That’s what we did –

They are easy to transport;



Cut a notch in a hillside and slide it in;



Hook up the piping, fill with water and then backfill around and over it.
They are not all that big and it would be one heck of a cramped shelter, and you would indeed have a heck of a time with condensation.
 

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Never Give up
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Not a good idea!!

You really should fill those tanks with water before you backfill them, or they may cave in!
Once the fill has settled around them they are safe to drain, assuming you don’t have to much weight on top. I don’t think it would be wise to “pour concrete over the top.”
You might get away with burying one, grading the area over it flat and then pouring a reinforced slab on that..
Best of all – Use ‘em to store water!
That’s what we did –

They are easy to transport;



Cut a notch in a hillside and slide it in;



Hook up the piping, fill with water and then backfill around and over it.
They are not all that big and it would be one heck of a cramped shelter, and you would indeed have a heck of a time with condensation.
Hes right on all acounts but there is also the fact if you get your ground completly waterloged and theres no real weight in them they tend to float out of the hole. Ive seen it when people use them for water and they drain them all the way down when the ground is real wet. I kinda sucks.
 

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I have gotten into stock piling and would consider myself at the beginning stages of being a prepper. I am a survivalist and want a safe place to hide out if necessary. A few weeks ago, I was on my parents property in Wisconsin. I stumbled upon an old 12'wide x 12'tall concrete cistern on a hill side with an 18" manhole type cover to open it. There is a small amount of water in it from the vent pipe being snapped off just above the ground so some rain water has gotten in over the past 40 years. I already know that I would need to vent it to provide fresh air. I interested in talking to people who have design/logistics ideas aswell as how to make it as safe as possible. Thanks!
 

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What about a prefab concrete man hole box? Or have a concrete shelter built for you? I used to do concrete work and we built box culverts, and man hole boxes. There is a roll on rubber coating you can get for concrete, that is made for house foundations. Add some drain tile, and a sump pump that can run on battery power. If you put rebar in the walls, have walls 6-8 inches thick it would be plenty strong enough to hold the roof up, and be buried. Down side would be cost. Insulate the inside, and have air circulation. May have some condensation, but air flow will help.
 

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I've heard about those plastic tornado shelters floating up out of the ground too. Don't know how they get around that.
 

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Somewhat prepared
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A local septic tank company near me has precast concrete storm shelters that are 5 ft. 4inches X 10 ft 7 inches long and height is 74 inches. They are $1995 installed. It takes them about 4 hours to install one. They are vented and have a steel door.
 

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Wish I lived near you. I'd like to get a small storm shelter large enough for 4 people to sit in and ride out a storm for a few hours. And worst case could be used for a fallout shelter.
 

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Every book has an end
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I dont know about the water tanks i have an old one since we replaced ours its a 550gl tank good for rain water storage. I dont know but ive been thinkin of tire houses. We got a bunch of earthships (thats what they call them down here) tire and can homes. I figure why not build your underground shelter or storage outta old used tires, you can get the tires for free.
 
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