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I know eating insects have been discussed on this site a number of times.
I find the comment much like those decades ago regarding eating sushi in USA, before it was accepted.
Assuming one will become less picky in a SHTF situations where food is scarce, I will assume some of you will eat insects.
Now my rule for food is it should not take more calories to collect the food then the food provides!
So with insects I look at creating gathering points. This also works for my chickens that I raised for decades.
Compost provides insects for birds. But what about your tomatoes? Tobacco horned worm eating your tomatoes? Some say they taste like shrimp when battered and deep fried. Japanese beetles are easy to collect in traps. I use to feed them to my turkeys. Ducks will eat slugs, ducks will eat just about any insect or bug.

Can also focus on reducing bug populations. Chickens can help keep the tick population under control on your property. I originally got my chickens to help control the bug population in my area.
 

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Toasted grasshoppers are very popular in some countries. Fortunately they seem to thrive on grass, and Kansas has a great deal of that! I would not have to plant a thing.

My plan, however, is to feed the bugs to my backyard chickens, and then eat their eggs
 

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Toasted grasshoppers are very popular in some countries. Fortunately they seem to thrive on grass, and Kansas has a great deal of that! I would not have to plant a thing.

My plan, however, is to feed the bugs to my backyard chickens, and then eat their eggs

i was thinking about setting up a light that is solar powered to attract night insects [think june bugs] to help add to chicken food

my idea is sort of like a solar oven in reverse a small light being reflected out over a pasture area
 

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I think the plants would produce far more "food" than the insects they might attract could provide.

I've read that it takes 12-15 pounds of grain and forage to produce 1 lb of beef?
Wonder how much it takes to make 1 lb of mealworms, grubs or crickets?
 

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I think the plants would produce far more "food" than the insects they might attract could provide.

I've read that it takes 12-15 pounds of grain and forage to produce 1 lb of beef?
Wonder how much it takes to make 1 lb of mealworms, grubs or crickets?
For some fish it takes, I believe, between 1.5 to 1.75 pounds of feed to make a pound of fish. That does not mean edible portion: the weight of the head and such is included. I suspect that the insects do not need more than that.

But wait! Many insects fly. That means that if you set up a light at night, that you would be attracting the bugs that grew up someplace else.

OPSEC might be a problem, though, as people would figure out pretty quickly that you are feeding poultry, unless they think that the trapped bugs are for your own dinner.

I have many old agriculture books that gave the feed ratio to pigs as 6 pounds of feed to produce 1 pound of pig. That would explain why pork is cheaper than beef
 

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During the meat shortage of the 70's people in my church (translate prepping group) farmed worms. If I remember correctly there was very little set up and overhead. And land was used for crops you could eat. As far as the food made from worms- they were dried and ground and used as a high protein replacement for portions of flour in normal food; pasta, bread, cookies.
 

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I guess you could plant crops for em but I've always attracted PLENTY of bugs just by setting up lights around the chiclen coop and runs. Come morning there's plenty of pickings for the girls to enjoy.

I've eaten all manner of creepy crawlies and some while quite good still don't compare to the fresh eggs or the occasional fryer I cull out.

For emergency survival bugs are an option. In dire situations perhaps the only option. That's really about the only time I'd seriously chow down on them. I mean if your planting crops for bugs why not just plant things you can eat?
 

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I think the plants would produce far more "food" than the insects they might attract could provide.

I've read that it takes 12-15 pounds of grain and forage to produce 1 lb of beef?
Wonder how much it takes to make 1 lb of mealworms, grubs or crickets?
Grain, no, forage, yes.

Cattle gain about 1 lb per 6 lb of feed. They dress at about 63%. So you end up with 6 lbs of feed producing 0.63 lbs of dressed carcass.

the advantage of cattle is they can be fed perennial gas on pasture- here in the south year round-though most people bale it as hay and then feed it.

The insect analog is probally cautalpa trees, which host a yearly crop of catalpa worms. I don’t know how they taste, but the fish sure love them.

Remember humans can not convert cellulose to energy, some animals can.
 

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I've got a big barn cat that would rather eat bugs than about anything else. If I set up a work light outside at night, he'll wait outside the ring of light and wait for big moths and cicadas to crash into the light and drop to the ground. Then he'll run in, get the body inside his mouth and use his front paws to rip the wings off. Then he crunches 'em up and swallows them and runs outside the circle of light to wait for another one. He'll eat a dozen of them a night at least. He's the biggest, most muscular cat I've ever seen. He kills adult squirrels and eats them when he can catch them, but he loves big juicy bugs more than anything else.
I got him when he was feral and little more than a big kitten, so I think he learned to eat bugs just to survive. If food got scarce, I'm pretty sure that I'd follow his lead and see how filling bugs are. Seems that if people stopped driving cars there'd be a lot more insects around. Protein is protein, and if you're hungry enough you'll eat about anything. No reason that insects should be off the menu.
 

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I have wondered what a bug-based pemmican (bugs not beef) would play out....

Men in Japanese run POW camps harvested cockroaches for protien....so, there is some (anecdotal) evidence that bugs can work for Chow....


And since they already eat bats...
 
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