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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my bean and pea planting thread. In this thread I am going to attempt to show the steps I took to get the ground prepared and the peas planted.

The first step was to get the beans that will be used for seed. The seeds I will be using have been in the freezer for the past 3 or 4 weeks.

The beans and peas were put into a bowl of water in an effort to get them to sprout.

This is where we are at right now. Tomorrow, if everything is going ok the ground will be broke and the seeds will be planted.
 

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Hunter/Farmer
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When Burpee started to sell those sugar snap peas back in the late 70's, I had a garden in Mississippi and planted them both spring and fall.
I luv those things!, ate my fill whenever I worked in the garden.:D
Alais!, the last two times I tried them here, they did not do well,....prolly because of the high humidity. I'm going to give them another shot this fall.
 

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Hunter/Farmer
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As a general rule, plant beans after your last frost free date. A light frost will kill most.
Peas can take frosts and freezes, and do best in the cooler months.
 

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I just got my seeds yesterday.

Im planning on trying to sow my peas outside in containers. Spinich too. Ive never done this before, hope it works.

Question, do i need to use pea innoculant when I plant these seedlings in the garden?
 

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Those pea&bean innoculants are insurance against the possibility that the soil is void of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. With containerized gardens with sterile soils, I would use them.
That said, I haven't used them in years in my plot gardens and have had good results without them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Question, do i need to use pea innoculant when I plant these seedlings in the garden?
pea innoculant???? Soak them for a couple of days in a bowl of water and plant them. Or just plant the seeds and water the rows really well.
 

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I just soaked my seeds last night. Im not sure that was the right thing to do since Im winter sowing. Well see what happens.Im putting them in an old water jug outside on my porch.
 

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I SOAKED MINE FOR ABOUT 30 MINUTES THEN PLANTED THEM IN THE CELL RACKS. we won't beable to transplant for another 2-3,4 weeks. everything is ready except we just have to get some sand and top soil mixed in and the ground has been broke for a few days and tilled about 4 times. i can't wait
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just planted the beans and peas. We have some rain coming in tomorrow, so I tilled up the ground, added some bone meal, 13-13-13 fertilizer and some iron powder from working on my bar-b-q pit. The seeds were planted kinda thick, but they should do ok. I was wanting to add some manure, but just ran out of time.

I SOAKED MINE FOR ABOUT 30 MINUTES THEN PLANTED THEM IN THE CELL RACKS.
The only thing I transplant is tomatoes, and peppers. This year I might plant my own pepper plants.

Some types of plants, when you transplant them, they will go into shock. This can stunt the growth of the plant. Only transplant the types of plants you have to. Most of the time it is better to plant the seed directly into the ground, instead of planting and then transplanting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've never tried soaking them. Does it make a big difference in the time they pop through the soil?
Its a way of kick starting them into sprouting. The seeds think the spring time rains are here and its time to sprout.

Usually 3 - 4 days in the water and they will sprout, then you plant the ones that sprouted.
 

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Went to Home Depot and bought herloom (sp) seeds, planted to see how long it takes. Planted the 1st of March and have 3inch tall tomato plants. Also will experiment with seed from what is grown now and if can be used next season. Never did this before but then as Abe Lincoln said "things are anew so we must think anew" Great man, if he was here the **** would be hitting the fan or George Washington.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Went to Home Depot and bought herloom (sp) seeds, planted to see how long it takes. Planted the 1st of March and have 3inch tall tomato plants. Also will experiment with seed from what is grown now and if can be used next season. Never did this before but then as Abe Lincoln said "things are anew so we must think anew" Great man, if he was here the **** would be hitting the fan or George Washington.
Start you a thread on your garden, post some pictures and the thread will be made into a sticky in this section.
 

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hmmm.. i didn't know that i'll make sure to keep an eye on them..they are starting to come up now. i just looked this morning, 8 out of the 18 planted! will some of them be bad and no germinate? will putting them out in the garage even though it still stays pretty cold in the garage. i'm thinkin we don't have too too many freezing nights comming up. its startin warm up a lil here! i'm thinking if i leave them in the garage it'll help them out in the transplanting process, kinda like when you transfer a new fish to an aquarium.
 

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Peas

When Burpee started to sell those sugar snap peas back in the late 70's, I had a garden in Mississippi and planted them both spring and fall.
I luv those things!, ate my fill whenever I worked in the garden.:D
Alais!, the last two times I tried them here, they did not do well,....prolly because of the high humidity. I'm going to give them another shot this fall.
Back in the seventies or early eighties, I planted peas one year. I had no knowledge how to do it, but planted them in rows far apart so I could get in between for easy picking. I planted 6 long rows. I didn't know how prolific they were going to be! We had enough peas that I could even shell and freeze! Of course, the "salad peas" I had been used to eating as a child, that you cook like green beans are my favorites, these shell peas were favorites of my then husband and family. There were enough peas left for neighbors to come pick "messes" for themselves and lots of people who asked if I'd pick them a "mess". Take my advice....if u plant it, pick ur own. If someone else wants something, let them pick their own. I learned this the hard way! Not that I wouldn't help out a disabled neighbor, but if they are able, they can starve before I'll pick anything for them!
Anyway, planted some peas last year and believe me, the seeds were not cheap. I planted in soil not accustomed to me; clay. I don't know what happened, but my peas were a disaster. This year I plan on planting the peas with potting soil on top until they peep their heads through and then how around them. Any other suggestions?
Snap peas eaten in the garden...never tried it but will now!
 

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Molōn Labe!
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the major decision when it comes to beans is choosing what type you want to plant, be it a bush type or a pole type. Runners are available, but i classify them in the pole type as well. Bush types are what you would think of in terms of "dwarf" versions.. meaning they are short and bushy. The pole types need a trellis or climbing lines they can grow up. The typical setup for these is to use some bamboo poles and tie them into a teepee. Plant 1-3 beans per bamboo stick around the base so they will grow upwards. If you have a large enough area and can get long enough bamboo sticks, you can make a real teepee out of bean plants such that they cover it entirely and have enough interior room to sit/lay down in. These are great for kids to camp out in or put a chair in to make it an afternoon reading spot. Most pole beans will grow about 6 or 7 feet tall, but some varieties will grow higher. Check your variety to determine your needs.

Wind some twine or other rough material around the bamboo to give better grip to the vines. For bush beans, you can just plant them wherever you are able.
 

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Local BAMF
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Alais!, the last two times I tried them here, they did not do well,....prolly because of the high humidity. I'm going to give them another shot this fall.
It's the heat that is more likely wiping them out; they are not heat tolerant at all. Plant them before the last frost in the early spring, and again in late summer after the really hot weather is done.
 
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