Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Forum Administrator
Joined
·
16,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My opinion, if your going to prepare for some kind of event, then fruit trees should be part of your plans - especially if you own enough plant to plant some trees. If your an urban survivalist, then take a look at the dwarf fruit trees.

Some types of dwarfs may not get 8 feet tall and might be something good to plant in the corners of your fence. If you have a fence in your backyard, what do you have planted in the corners right now anyway? Planting the fruit tree across the back fence might provide it with more sun light, as compared to planting it between the houses.

Over the past few years I have made it a point to plant some fruit trees. Some of the types I have planted include peach, plum, apple, and a fig tree.



While planting the peach trees, I used miracle grow organic potting soil and some miracle grow plant food. The plant food was really 10-10-10 with a little extra sulfur mixed in.

In 2008 I spread some 13-13-13 fertilizer around a peach tree in the spring. We were "supposed" to get some rain to help was the fertilizer in. We did not get the rain and the tree died. I think I put too much fertilizer around the tree. So in the spring of 2010, I'am going easy with the fertilizer.

To measure the distance between the trees, instead of using a tape measure, I used a 50 foot piece of rope folded in half. This gives me 25 feet between each tree.

When picking the different types of trees that you want to plant, take into consideration when the fruit is ready to be picked. I like to plant different types of trees so that the fruit ripens at different times. One might ripen in July, another might ripen in August, and another might ripen in September. This gives me time to preserve the fruit. Even if I do not preserve the fruit, having the fruit ripen at different times spreads out my food supply.

In the end I'am hoping on having 5, maybe 6 peach trees planted, 6 apple trees, several fig trees and 4 - 6 plum trees.
 

·
Woodland Survivalist
Joined
·
646 Posts
I have a peach and apple tree. So far only small peaches, as the trees are still young, but those dang squirrels always get to them first when we go on vacation. I also have blueberries, gooseberries, and more.
 

·
Forum Administrator
Joined
·
16,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have a peach and apple tree.
Peach trees are self pollinating. Meaning, they can pollinate themselves.

Apples trees are not self pollinating. Meaning, you need another apple tree planted nearby - and preferably a different type of apple tree then what you have.

I have 4 apple trees planted - 2 yellows and 2 reds. That way they can cross pollinate each other.
 

·
Looks like rain to me.
Joined
·
41,428 Posts
Kev, what varities of peaches did you put in?

My neighbor and I planted a couple apple trees. They cross pollinate each other. I just can't keep the deer out of mine. Apple fed deer are tasty, but the neighbors would get up in arms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
When you plant more plums, make sure you plant at least one, and preferably two good pollinators. I don't know what the extension services recommend now, but Methley used to be the best. A bonus is that Methley is a heavy, dependable producer, and the flavor of the fruit is just out of this world. Many plum varieties are not self pollinating. If you have only one tree, unless it is self pollinating, you will have very few plums. It might get pollinated by wild plums in the area.

You need to start pruning your peach trees. You are wasting money by planting those huge, containerized trees. You will do just as well planting a "switch," and it is much easier to train the trees. The trees in the photos below were switches, planted in good soil with pH and fertility amendments in place, and they were bearing fruit the second season. My family has been involved in the peach and plum industry one way or another in Middle Georgia for over 100 years now. We don't grow peaches ourselves now, but we have leased our land to the largest peach grower in Georgia. The trees and peaches in the pictures are on our land.




 

·
Actias Luna
Joined
·
4,228 Posts
When you plant more plums, make sure you plant at least one, and preferably two good pollinators. I don't know what the extension services recommend now, but Methley used to be the best. A bonus is that Methley is a heavy, dependable producer, and the flavor of the fruit is just out of this world. Many plum varieties are not self pollinating. If you have only one tree, unless it is self pollinating, you will have very few plums. It might get pollinated by wild plums in the area.

You need to start pruning your peach trees. You are wasting money by planting those huge, containerized trees. You will do just as well planting a "switch," and it is much easier to train the trees. The trees in the photos below were switches, planted in good soil with pH and fertility amendments in place, and they were bearing fruit the second season. My family has been involved in the peach and plum industry one way or another in Middle Georgia for over 100 years now. We don't grow peaches ourselves now, but we have leased our land to the largest peach grower in Georgia. The trees and peaches in the pictures are on our land.

I am fairly new to growing fruit trees and I'm guilty of wasting money on the containerized trees. What do you mean by planting a switch?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
539 Posts
Fruit Trees ,,Yea I can rant on that for a sec , !! 1 If can see cedar trees anywhere near you ,, don't do apple trees ,the cedars cauz cedar/apple rust and unless you want to spray big time or do as the book says ,,cut all cedars within a 1/2 mile ,,( course I planted them when I was young,dumb &full of,, but thats another story !! ) You know how many cedars are within a 1/2 mile of my back yard !!! 2 Peaches or plums ,in my area( zone 6/7 sorta ) they are hit or miss they tend to bloom early and then get nailed by a late frost,my last frost last 2 yrs has been around mid april. 3 This year I am trying some differant nut trees ,pecan,almond &butternut.I have hickorys and walnuts so I will see how the others do. 4 I've tried several other types of fruit trees with not much sucess and recently had someone tell me that an aprioct wouid do well here so I am trying a couple of those.5 Not trees but I am working on a couple of ,,wild grape vines , that I have cut back and built arbors for .6 Also not trees ,but I have planted goji ,huckleberries,rasberries !!
 

·
Forum Administrator
Joined
·
16,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You will do just as well planting a "switch," and it is much easier to train the trees.
Thank you for the advice.

I do not understand what you mean by planting a "switch"? Do you mean cut a limb off a tree and plant it?

As for the types of peaches, I have planted elberta and ranger peaches. I do not remember seeing any Methley peaches for sale around here, but I will keep an eye out for them.
 

·
workin on it......
Joined
·
1,110 Posts
I'm just starting this sort of project. I went to my state's extension service website and found a book online that I downloaded and printed out called Home Orchard Management. A small orchard is my next project. I've planted the berry bushes that I've wanted. Reading the book, I've found that it depends greatly on your soil and weather as to which type of fruit trees will grow where you are. Not all names will do well where you are.
On the same website, I found pamphlets that gave names of berry bushes that would do well in WV soil. That was very helpful when I went to purchase some.
You all should check your states website.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,092 Posts
i planted some apples last yr to replace the ones i lost in the icestorm. peach and plums the goal this yr. saw your vid on the tube a couple days ago. thanks
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
23,828 Posts
We did some research on this when we were first drawing our future orchard.

If you use dwarf fruit trees, you can plant them closer together, and therefore plant more trees in the same space.

However when viewed in a square-foot context an orchard of dwarf trees will produce 60% of the fruit harvest that you would get from full-sized fruit trees. So for planting, watering, and pruning more trees you get less harvest.

We decided to go with full-sized trees. Granted you end up planting less trees, but your harvest is much more.



First we planted 16 apple trees.

I planted our apple trees in raised beds due to the high moisture in our forest.

I selected our apple trees first by harvest season; one group of trees that ripens mid-fall, and a second group that ripens in late fall to early winter.

Secondly we selected one variety in each group that produces an apple known for high sugar content, and two varieties noted for tart or acid content.

Our hope being to spread out the harvest a bit, so as not to over-load us with apples all at once.

And also to provide two different blends of apple juices for fermenting.

Following is the list of what apple trees we are planting. The number of trees, and then a description of their fruit.

We avoided all of the summer varieties, and tried to avoid having all apples coming into harvest all at once.

4- 'Sweet 16 Apples': harvested Early Fall.
Whenever anyone eats a Sweet 16 for the first time, you know they will be surprised. Fine-textured crisp flesh contains an astounding unusually complex combination of sweet nutty and spicy flavors with slight anise essence, sometimes described as cherry, vanilla or even bourbon. Truly excellent fresh eating, although it is too sweet for some pallets. Round-conic bronze-red medium-sized fruit, striped and washed with rose-red.

2- 'Prima Apples': harvested Fall.
Medium-large roundish fruit has rich yellow skin with a striking orange-red blush. Mildly subacid juicy white flesh provides excellent eating and makes good cider. Keeps a couple of months.

4- 'Minnesota 447 apples': harvested Fall-Winter.
Developed at the University of Minnesota before 1936, but never introduced. This massively flavored dessert apple—not for the faint of heart—provides a whole new level of culinary experience. Likely the most distinctive and unusual apple I’ve ever tried. Astonished friends have described its flavor as strange, molasses, olives, fabulous, sweet, complex and sugar cane. The roundish fruit is medium-sized and entirely covered with dark bluish-purple stripes. The aromatic crisp crystalline flesh is an apricot-orange color with occasional red staining, so juicy it’ll run down your hand. Years ago David Bedford of the University of Minnesota said they would never release it because it didn’t taste like an apple. Joyfully they changed their minds.

2- 'Cortland Apples': harvested Fall-Winter
Medium to medium-large slightly ribbed dull red fruit with a purple blush. Excellent eating and cooking. Slow-oxidizing white flesh is very good in salads; fine-grained, crisp, tender, juicy. Produces a surprisingly delightful cider, fresh or fermented, in a mix or even on its own. Vigorous tall upright spreading tree with reddish bark. Annual producer of heavy crops.

2- 'Esopus Spitzenburg apples': harvested Fall-Winter.
Without peer in flavor and quality. A choice dessert and culinary apple, mentioned in nearly every list of best-flavored varieties. Slightly subacid, crisp and juicy. Famous for being Thomas Jefferson’s favorite apple. Medium-large bright-red round to mostly conic fruit, covered with russet dots. Excellent acid source for sweet or fermented cider.



Then the next year we planted the rest of our orchard:

1 Black Walnut; Juglans *****, Their husks yield a rich brown dye. Husks, leaves and roots all have anti-fungal properties. Deep taproot. Prefers moist well-drained soils.

1 Cape Rosier Basket Willow Salix If you’re looking to make a basket, pruned heavily will produce long whips for basket-making. Prefers sun and moist soils.

1 Northern Pecan Carya illinoensis 70'x70' Although they may be plenty hardy in much of the north, they do require summer heat and a warm fall to fill the nuts. Very large tree likes lots of room and clay or sandy soils rich with organic matter. Will take 3–4 years to establish a taproot. Then the trees should grow rapidly. Taproots do not like ledge!

1 Ginkgo biloba Slow-growing, can be extremely long-lived. Unique fine-cut fan-shaped foliage turns sparkling golden-yellow in fall, then all at once the leaves drop and within hours the tree is bare. Edible seeds, produced on female trees. Leaf tea used to enhance circulation to the brain and extremities. Prefers moist sandy neutral soils but is very adaptable.

2 Cherry; Stella Cherry Mid-summer. The first hardy good-quality self-fertile sweet cherry. Large heart-shaped black-skinned fruit has juicy medium-firm black flesh. Self-pollinating.

2 Garfield Plantation Cherry Heirloom pie cherry grown for generations on an Aroostook County farm. Hardy, disease resistant, productive and extremely long-lived.

1 Witch Hazel Hamamelis virginiana A small tree or large shrub of irregular rounded form and interesting crooked branches. Witch hazel extract, from leaves, young bark and roots, has astringent and antiseptic uses. Said to be the preferred wood of dowsers. Full sun or shade. Prefers moist acid soils; avoid dry spots. No pests or diseases, does well with very little care.

2 Chestnut; American Chestnut is a vigorous fast-growing tree, with delicious, sweet kernel nuts. It is also adaptable to different soils and climates. If a large crop of nuts is desired, several trees should be planted to insure good pollination. Trees begin to bear when only a few years old.

3 pear;
Luscious Pear Early Fall. Produces annual crops of delicious medium-sized fruit. Bears so heavily that it’s apt to break branches. The soft fine extra-juicy off-white flesh is sweet and flavorful with almost no grit cells. Thin yellowish skin is covered with small tan dots.

Seckel Pear Late Summer. Usually considered the best-flavored of all pears; even the skin is delicious. Small obovate fruit is yellowish-brown russeted with slight red blush. Juicy, spicy, distinctive and aromatic. Very productive annual-bearing large tree, easy to grow. The most reliably bearing fruit tree I have. Scab and fireblight resistant.

Stacyville Pear Late Summer. Medium-sized obovate obtuse-pyriform pears are light yellow with a beautiful orange to greyish-red blush. The sweet fruit has a delicious citrusy aftertaste. it produces large crops of fruit annually. self-pollinating. Disease resistant, extremely hardy and very vigorous.

5 Plum;
American Plum Prunus americana produces very decent red, yellow and orange 1" fruit, suitable for fresh eating, canning and freezing. Spectacular white bloom in spring. Red fall color. Extremely hardy.

South Dakota Plum Late Summer. Small to medium-sized fruit has tough yellow skin with bright red blush. Medium-firm yellow flesh is meaty, juicy, sweet. Freestone. Vigorous tree.

Superior Plum Late Summer. Very large conical dark red plum with a heavy bloom and ‘superior’ dessert quality. Firm sweet yellow flesh is smooth textured, extremely juicy and clingstone. Very good fresh eating. Precocious production, vigorous tree.

Toka Plum Late Summer. Rosy red fruit, up to 1-1/2" in diameter, mottled with darker purply red and covered with a faint bloom. Sweet, distinctive, meaty and flavorful. Not real juicy. Extremely vigorous tree blooms heavily every year. Diligent pruning may be required to keep it from becoming a bit of a monster.

2 Fig;
Chicago Hardy Elsewhere

Violette de Bordeaux Small to medium size purple-black fruit with a very deep red strawberry pulp, a distinctive sweet rich flavor. Medium eye. Excellent fresh or dried. hardy.


1 Mulberry; Pakistan Fruiting Mulberry Long (3 inches), firm, red to black, sweet syncarpous (like a blackberry) fruit. Non-staining juice. Month-long early summer harvest. Fruit used fresh and for pies, jams and jellies. Large, vigorous, disease-resistant tree.

2 Hazelnut / Filbert; Corylus americana Very good 1/2" nuts. Highly resistant or immune to filbert blight. Native to eastern North America.

2 apricot; Jerseycot Medium-sized fruit (approximately 1-1/2") round to round-oblong in shape. Light-orange with a slight green suture in some years and generally with no blush. The orange flesh is usually mild but can develop a melon-like quality. Very good eating. disease resistant and good cold hardiness. Self-pollinating.

2 Almond;
Hall’s Hardy Almond large, excellent quality nuts have thin, papery shells that are easy to crack. a very hardy strain that will thrive anywhere peaches can be grown. Self-fertile.

2 Elderberry;
Sambucus canadensis Adams No. 1 Vigorous strong productive bushes. Large berries and fruit clusters.

Sambucus canadensis Goodbarn Elderberry unusual hardiness, vigor and apparent self-fertility. It blooms heavily and produces large crops annually. What it lacks in commercial fruit size it makes up for with its impressive productivity.


Good luck now :)
 

·
Woodland Survivalist
Joined
·
646 Posts
Peach trees are self pollinating. Meaning, they can pollinate themselves.

Apples trees are not self pollinating. Meaning, you need another apple tree planted nearby - and preferably a different type of apple tree then what you have.

I have 4 apple trees planted - 2 yellows and 2 reds. That way they can cross pollinate each other.
Well I did get one apple one year with only one tree, but my mom accidentally cut it off when trimming the tree (I don't know what she was thinking). If you are right a bee must of stopped at another apple tree before it came to mine, or I have a special tree.
 

·
Forum Administrator
Joined
·
16,781 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If you are right a bee must of stopped at another apple tree before it came to mine, or I have a special tree.
There might be another apple tree planted within a few miles of your house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
kev,
i have elberta peach trees.last year,i got some of those tree fertilizer spikes at home depot and pounded them into the ground on 4 sides of the tree.they worked great and last 3 months.
first year on one tree(it was a 6ft tall broom when i bought it)yielded 46 peaches.they were smaller than the ones you buy in the store,but not bad.

look for fruit trees in the fall at lowes or home depot.they put them on clearance for 2-5 dollars to get rid of them.good time to stock up or buy landscaping plants and trees.
 

·
Board Supporter
Joined
·
2,049 Posts
I planted our apple trees in raised beds due to the high moisture in our forest.

Then the next year we planted the rest of our orchard:

3 pear;
Luscious Pear Early Fall.
Seckel Pear Late Summer.
Stacyville Pear Late Summer.
Hey Forest,
I was told by the head garden person at our local feed/nursery store that you shouldn't plant pear trees and apple trees together, because they cross-pollinate. Have you had any trouble with this happening?

I also noticed someone saying that you needed two apple trees to cross pollinate. The grounds keeper at Henricus Dutch Gap historical village was telling us that you needed at least three apple trees for the cross pollination. Do you have any information on that as well?
 

·
off-grid organic farmer
Joined
·
23,828 Posts
Hey Forest,
I was told by the head garden person at our local feed/nursery store that you shouldn't plant pear trees and apple trees together, because they cross-pollinate. Have you had any trouble with this happening?
They need to be poliinated to produce heavy.

What they pollinate with will effect the genetics in the seed, not in the fruit.

You never normally propagate nursery fruit trees from seed anyway. Because apple seeds will 99.995% of the time produce 'crab-apples'.

There are a few apple breeders who do. Plant thousands of apple seeds, grow them all to production and sample all of the crabapples hoping for one sweet apple. It takes many years, perhaps a lietime in an orchard to produce one tree of a new variety.

Normally fruit trees are propagated using cuttings.



... I also noticed someone saying that you needed two apple trees to cross pollinate. The grounds keeper at Henricus Dutch Gap historical village was telling us that you needed at least three apple trees for the cross pollination. Do you have any information on that as well?
Three or more is better, for better harvest.

We have two groups, a summer-fall group and a fall-winter group. Each group has three varieties.

Instead of an apple orchard of 16 trees producing at the same time, this way it is divided into two smaller harvests. Less strenous work for me this way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
"switch"

Thank you for the advice.

I do not understand what you mean by planting a "switch"?
I mean a switch like your mama used to whip you with!

Actually, the trees commercial orchards plant are often referred to as switches because they do resemble that disciplinary device. They are nursery grown trees, grafted to a rootstock, and sold at a young age. When you plant one of the large trees you buy from a Lowes, or a seed store, you are wasting all that growth, because if you prune properly, you are going to cut the tree back to a stub. Otherwise, you can't train it properly.

This picture is what the trees we plant look like. This is actually a limb that was pruned off one of the trees. I am just showing what the tree would look like. It would of course have a root system, maybe wrapped in burlap or peat moss.



You would plant that tree in a subsoiler furrow and compact the dirt nicely. Then, you would take your clippers and cut the tree back to about knee high. I would clip that one immediately above that lateral branch you can see just below the UGA Alumni tag. You do not want the tree growing up. You want it growing out. You want to train about four lateral branches to start right at the point you clipped the tree. If you do not clip it, it will continue growing straight up. By the third year, you want the tree to look like this.


This tree has four lateral limbs off the trunk and each lateral has two or three branches. This opens the tree in the middle so that sunlight can get in so the fruit can size up and color up. These trees are in just about full bloom. This particular tree is an old variety, Red Globe. The peaches in the hat and the one cut in half on the pickup tailgate are from this orchard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
My opinion, if your going to prepare for some kind of event, then fruit trees should be part of your plans - especially if you own enough plant to plant some trees. If your an urban survivalist, then take a look at the dwarf fruit trees.

Some types of dwarfs may not get 8 feet tall and might be something good to plant in the corners of your fence. If you have a fence in your backyard, what do you have planted in the corners right now anyway? Planting the fruit tree across the back fence might provide it with more sun light, as compared to planting it between the houses.

Over the past few years I have made it a point to plant some fruit trees. Some of the types I have planted include peach, plum, apple, and a fig tree.

YouTube- Planting a peach tree and fruit tree considerations


While planting the peach trees, I used miracle grow organic potting soil and some miracle grow plant food. The plant food was really 10-10-10 with a little extra sulfur mixed in.

In 2008 I spread some 13-13-13 fertilizer around a peach tree in the spring. We were "supposed" to get some rain to help was the fertilizer in. We did not get the rain and the tree died. I think I put too much fertilizer around the tree. So in the spring of 2010, I'am going easy with the fertilizer.

To measure the distance between the trees, instead of using a tape measure, I used a 50 foot piece of rope folded in half. This gives me 25 feet between each tree.

When picking the different types of trees that you want to plant, take into consideration when the fruit is ready to be picked. I like to plant different types of trees so that the fruit ripens at different times. One might ripen in July, another might ripen in August, and another might ripen in September. This gives me time to preserve the fruit. Even if I do not preserve the fruit, having the fruit ripen at different times spreads out my food supply.

In the end I'am hoping on having 5, maybe 6 peach trees planted, 6 apple trees, several fig trees and 4 - 6 plum trees.
Try some pear trees, they are prolific producers and you can make pear preserves and pear butter. I have a small orchard of 2 peach, 2 plum, 2 pear and 2 apple trees planted in an open area of my place and a pear tree I planted in an opening in the woods. I plan to make a garden next to the orchard and fence it all off against animals. In the corners I plan to plant some grapevines so they can use the corner posts for support.

Good luck wit your trees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
Commercial orchard in Middle Georgia

Here are some pictures I made today of an orchard that was planted near my wife's farm last week. The trees were planted in a subsoiler furrow in a rye/clover cover. The trees are planted with a mechanical tree planter, and laborers come behind the planter straightening the tree and compacting some soil around them. Later, a high clearance tractor will come along and pull the dirt back in the subsoiler trench. Then, a pruning crew will come along, clipping the trees back to start the lateral branching. These trees, according to the tags, are 18 to 24 inches. I don't know what variety.


 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top