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Wild Edibles Expert
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Okay, I'll admit it: I bought a $170 plant book... so I am reading every single word on all 909 pages. The author is a long-term professor of ethnobotany, Dr. Daniel Austin. On page 108/9 he writes about "arisaema" Jack-in-the-Pulpit:

"When I was a professor in Florida, a mother and her young son came to me for "advice" about a science project that the boy was doing. He had apparently independently discovered that juice from the live plants applied to wounds stopped the pain. Since he was still in grade school, it seemed unlikely that he had scoured the old literature and learned that the natives of North America used the sap in the same matter. Regardless, he was doing an experiment that involved getting as many volunteers as possible to prick their fingers with a needle and then apply juice directly from the plants. I, too, became one of his subjects with plants that they had imported from New England. We dutifully cleaned the instruments, drew the blood from the end of my finger with a needle, and then applied the juice. The pain stopped immediately upon contact with the liquid. They told me that each person they had tested had exactly the same reaction.

"Since these plants are no longer common because of habitat loss, I certainly do not recommend having pharmaceutical companies run out and harvest them wholesale to create a new pain-fighting product for the market. However, if you do happen to be near a wild region where the herbs grow, and you wound yourself, keep the young man's experiment in mind. You just might stop the pain before you get back to civilization and apply a more expensive remedy."

Here's the range of the arisaema triphyllum, Jack In The Pulpit:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ARTR

And some info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arisaema_triphyllum
 

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Hubris begets Nemesis
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Okay, I'll admit it: I bought a $170 plant book... so I am reading every single word on all 909 pages. The author is a long-term professor of ethnobotany, Dr. Daniel Austin. On page 108/9 he writes about "arisaema" Jack-in-the-Pulpit:

"When I was a professor in Florida, a mother and her young son came to me for "advice" about a science project that the boy was doing. He had apparently independently discovered that juice from the live plants applied to wounds stopped the pain. Since he was still in grade school, it seemed unlikely that he had scoured the old literature and learned that the natives of North America used the sap in the same matter. Regardless, he was doing an experiment that involved getting as many volunteers as possible to prick their fingers with a needle and then apply juice directly from the plants. I, too, became one of his subjects with plants that they had imported from New England. We dutifully cleaned the instruments, drew the blood from the end of my finger with a needle, and then applied the juice. The pain stopped immediately upon contact with the liquid. They told me that each person they had tested had exactly the same reaction.

"Since these plants are no longer common because of habitat loss, I certainly do not recommend having pharmaceutical companies run out and harvest them wholesale to create a new pain-fighting product for the market. However, if you do happen to be near a wild region where the herbs grow, and you wound yourself, keep the young man's experiment in mind. You just might stop the pain before you get back to civilization and apply a more expensive remedy."

Here's the range of the arisaema triphyllum, Jack In The Pulpit:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ARTR

And some info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arisaema_triphyllum
Excellent post! I had learned about this from an old Vemont farmer a LONG time ago and had forgotten about it until now. Thanks very much.
 

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sounds like a bargain if thats your thing.
Having watched your videos and read a bit of your blog you got a good deal.
Given the time and cash I'd probably do the same on either cooking ( my past keeping pace with me ) or security ( work ).
Great piece of info, now if I can find it here......
Thanks.
 

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When I lived in Michigan, jack in the pulpit grew around the edges of almost all swamps. If you gently squeezed the flower and rolled it between you fingers it makes a weird noise kinda like a catfish. That good advise on the pain relief properties. I wonder if you made a tincture out of it if it would have the same........
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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Discussion Starter #6
Hey Straight Razor, nice post man.

You mind if I borrow your book?

:)
If you do a plant search and add the name Austin to it, if it is in that book it will come up in the search someplace. That's how I learned about the book and eventually bought it, particularly since I live in Florida and it is about Florida.
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Great post SR,
This is another option for the question I posted earlier this week.
Don't know if it is available in Aus, but will find out.
 

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Jesus Is Lord!
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As of 11/4/08, Amazon.com wanted 144 bucks for the same book. Yee. Wait for a sale or buy a good used one at Amazon.com later.

I used the search term "ethnobotany, Dr. Daniel Austin" to look for the book. Can anyone else find to book less than a hundred bucks? Where I live, Florida and my state has similar plants.
 

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The Chippewa of this area use it for pain. They also use it for an eyewash for sore eyes.

Fresh roots makes a poison for the enemy. The acid in it hurts to eat. The women use to grind up the fresh plant and mix it with meat, cooking it, and feed it to their enemies. The acid causes to much pain many people died from eating the poisoned food. The root can be dried completely to get rid of the acid but cooking will not get rid of it.

Rill
 

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Semper non compos mentis
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Thanks SR. Just a thought, maybe you post a few more little gems like this as you find them. Cheers, Herne
 
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