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Greetings,

I am curious as to the smell from pig farming. My neighbor has a 600-700lb sow that is lock up by herself in a 12x8' pen. I didn't notice too much of a smell other than the normal minimal manure, straw, urine etc, but it wasn't noticeable more than 5-10 ft away.

Is that normal for a pig pen? My mom seems to think that there is no way to raise pigs without it smelling for hundreds of yards away. I am curious that if they are given more pen space, would that cut down on the smell? I figure there would be more area for the poo and pee to soak in and not make a big sludge puddle.

I want to raise some pigs for meat and I want to see if I can feed them scraps from local restaurants.

So, what is your thought on smell? What is the best way to minimize it?
 

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It just depends on the size of the pig pen, and the number of pigs. Last pig we raised was by itself in a 30' x 30' pen. No smell. On the other hand when my grandfather was alive, his pigs smelled, and were noticeable for a good distance down wind, but he would have 100 pigs on roughly 1 acre.
 

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As for feeding scraps from restaurants, you need to check the laws in your state. Your county extension office should be able to tell you. In South Carolina you can only feed scraps from your own kitchen, and only to a pig you intend to slaughter and eat yourself, or a pet. No slop if you plan to sell the pig. But even the extension offices here tell people that it's there's no way to make money on a pig without slopping from multiple sources, so just feed them grain instead of slop for a couple weeks before hand if you plan on taking them to market.

Unless you have access to cheap grain, it is cheaper to just buy pork than to feed just grain.
 

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Greetings,

I am curious as to the smell from pig farming. My neighbor has a 600-700lb sow that is lock up by herself in a 12x8' pen. I didn't notice too much of a smell other than the normal minimal manure, straw, urine etc, but it wasn't noticeable more than 5-10 ft away.

Is that normal for a pig pen? My mom seems to think that there is no way to raise pigs without it smelling for hundreds of yards away. I am curious that if they are given more pen space, would that cut down on the smell? I figure there would be more area for the poo and pee to soak in and not make a big sludge puddle.

I want to raise some pigs for meat and I want to see if I can feed them scraps from local restaurants.

So, what is your thought on smell? What is the best way to minimize it?
trekker111 has offered you some good advice. The best way to cut down on smell is to give some room. Pigs, IF able, don't defecate and urinate on their bedding. I suspect that the instinct that causes this will evaporate, like the instinct for laying chickens to sit on eggs. They will do their business away from the bed. You need to provide that place. Hog manure stinks. Like yourself, diet contributes to this problem. The rotten-egg-and-ammonia smell of hog waste can be modified by what the hog is fed. Increasing amino acid intake and cutting down on protein intake will maintain weight gain, yet reduce the nitrogen in the manure that produces the ammonia. Soy bean meal will provide these amino acids. There are others, but I have no experience beyond soybeans. This would be difficult to achieve if you are feeding scraps. Might just make it worse. Confinement pens can be maintained with the sprinkling of sweet barn lime to reduce smell if your mother suggests you and Porky move on to new pastures.

By the time you raise a hog up to the 200-220 lb stage for butcher, you will have a good sum of effort into raising it. That is the most efficient weight to shoot for. Sow's get heavier, but they are fed for the litters they produce. For a feeder pig, after that 220 lb mark, your feed and efforts go mostly to fat, and you are adding to the final cost, pound per pound, to your meat.
Butchering a hog is not for the beginner. The cost of butchering will probably cost you half the hog. Weight gains from muscle development are better than weight gains from fat. Muscle gain will require protein, meaning you would have to be very selective of the scrap it is fed. You don't want to invest hard effort for a poor return.
 

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Since pigs can carry certain human diseases it is against the law in most places to feed restraunt scraps without cooking them first. Never raise one pig, he will turn himself into a pet. Raise two and sell one. Be careful of the breed. Get a lean meat hog like the red Duroc, a smaller pig but not so much fat. The smell is dependant on the space you have. Pigs on pasture or in woods ( ever better ) do not smell any worse the any other livestock. Make sure you have a tight fence and a loading shute if you are going to move them. Good luck.
 

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If you have never raised pigs before, don't put them out to pasture, you would have to put rings in their noses to keep them from going under the fence and really messing up your pasture for any other graziers. Keep them, I wouldn't do more than 2-3 to start, in a pen, with your panels buried part way in the grown, again, helps keep them in. In summer give them lots of water to wallow in, a mud hole, keep it wet, as they do not sweat. Feed them table scraps, go to grocery stores and ask them for old produce, if you give them acorns wait a week or two before slaughtering them. If you have any women feeding them, do not let them go in the pen during their period! Just throw the feed over the fence. Lets see, old plants from your veggie garden, they will eat those. Cracked corn. And yeah clean out the pens keep straw clean and dry and the smell is nothing worse than any other animal. I would stay away from the restaurant scraps, only cause the grease can go rancid easy and if will make you sick, it will make a pig sick. I would stay with the old produce from the grocery stores, take a couple of those big plastic storage boxes and hit a few, call ahead and ask the manager what day of the week they get their shipment in and hit them up that morning for the old stuff they are going to pitch.
 

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We have 5 piggies (fence is 32 x 64-it also houses 11 goats, 24 chickens and 30+ rabbits, everyone has plenty of room and no one is ever cramped) and no smell whatsoever. People who visit our little farm don't even realize there are so many animals here until they go around back, then its "you have pigs, they don't smell".
 

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I want some of those magic smell-free pigs. Mine smell like ****; pig **** to be precise. And I stock them at low densities; maybe two per acre. We have a lot of humidity, and that doesn't help.

Having said that, farms smell like farms, not florists shops. It shouldn't surprise anyone.
 

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I want some of those magic smell-free pigs. Mine smell like ****; pig **** to be precise. And I stock them at low densities; maybe two per acre. We have a lot of humidity, and that doesn't help.

Having said that, farms smell like farms, not florists shops. It shouldn't surprise anyone.
We don't supply a large amount of water for them to make slop in (they do have a 3x3 plastic pool that has about 4 inches of water kept in it, they mostly drink our of it & sometimes they get in it but they don't have mud near them to make a mess), we provide hay (we put down about 6 inches every fall throughout the barnyard) that they tunnel in and it keeps them happy.

The mud mixed with poo is what smells. Eliminate the mud and you get rid of the smell. I have a friend who raises piggies and her farm reeks to high heaven, her piggies poops are liquidy ans smell rotten. My piggies poops are solid and have little to no smell at all. We feed differently and she has mud - I don't, those are the differences.

We feed organically too, I have seen a big difference in the poop smell alone when we changed the piggies over to "natural" feeds instead of what most feed. We feed human quality fresh veges and kudzu, there are no animal by products or rotted food in the mix.
 

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We raised two in a 20' x 20' pen built of hog panels. Every couple of weeks we moved the panels 20 ft. We kept rotating it back and forth. No smell. The next spring we gardened where the hogs had been. It produced well!
 

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When you have a sizeable pig farm there is no getting away from that 24/7 smell...A coworker years ago had pigs..I don't know how many butr it was dozens..The smell would be on his clothes when he came to work...He was a very clean person with clean clothes showering ect but there was no getting away from that odor..
 

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Greetings,

I am curious as to the smell from pig farming. My neighbor has a 600-700lb sow that is lock up by herself in a 12x8' pen. I didn't notice too much of a smell other than the normal minimal manure, straw, urine etc, but it wasn't noticeable more than 5-10 ft away.

Is that normal for a pig pen? My mom seems to think that there is no way to raise pigs without it smelling for hundreds of yards away. I am curious that if they are given more pen space, would that cut down on the smell? I figure there would be more area for the poo and pee to soak in and not make a big sludge puddle.

I want to raise some pigs for meat and I want to see if I can feed them scraps from local restaurants.

So, what is your thought on smell? What is the best way to minimize it?

keep the pen clean! We only do 2 at a time,...when we get lots of rain,..it gets really funky,..........but if everythings dry and freash hay,...not too bad.




also doing it on concrete will help,...mine's half concrete,..half wallow,......the wallow area is what gets really funky,......and yes on a wet day if I havent mucked it out,....it stinks out to about 100 feet,...lol
 

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If you want to continue, wire logs or weights to the bottom of your woven wire fence. If you don't, the pigs will go under. You must have shade for them or they will sunburn. We raised ours in scrub oak lots. You can buy a feeder ( weaned ) pig in the spring and have it ready to butcher in early winter. I checked our stores prices for you yesterday.
Burgers brown sugar country cured ham 13 lb @ 1.89 = 24.50
this will ruin you for eating other hams.
Sprial ham 11lb. @ .89 = 10.00
Sausage 6lb = 18.90
Bacon 10# box = 15.00
chops @ 1.39 20 lb = 30.00
4 hams and the rest comes to 115 pounds at $145.00
might be cheaper to buy your pig at the store. You can get cheaper than this if you watch for sales. The big advantage to raising your own pig is you know what is going into your meat as far as chemicals and growth hormones.
 

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If you want to continue, wire logs or weights to the bottom of your woven wire fence. If you don't, the pigs will go under. You must have shade for them or they will sunburn. We raised ours in scrub oak lots. You can buy a feeder ( weaned ) pig in the spring and have it ready to butcher in early winter. I checked our stores prices for you yesterday.
Burgers brown sugar country cured ham 13 lb @ 1.89 = 24.50
this will ruin you for eating other hams.
Sprial ham 11lb. @ .89 = 10.00
Sausage 6lb = 18.90
Bacon 10# box = 15.00
chops @ 1.39 20 lb = 30.00
4 hams and the rest comes to 115 pounds at $145.00
might be cheaper to buy your pig at the store. You can get cheaper than this if you watch for sales. The big advantage to raising your own pig is you know what is going into your meat as far as chemicals and growth hormones.
wow thats cheap,....we bought a spiral honey ham at christmas,..was over 30$!

and bacon is $3 a pound here!
 

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Large hog operations raise the hogs on metal slats above a lower concrete floor. the floor has running water through it and the sewage is carried off and processed just as human waste.

Smaller hog operations like your friend's are done with hog wallows.

I have read some interesting articles on processing petroleum (bio fuel) from hog waste.
 
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