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"eleutheromaniac"
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I just picked up my new Personal Locator Beacon, the ACR "ResQLink" model# PLB-375 and it is small but powerful.

I had a difficult ego Resistance to this decision. I did not want to accept that I might need to someday be rescued. In more than 40+ years of professionally guiding others, and thousands of solo expeditions in Alaska, I had always relied on myself to rescue myself, no matter what the trauma.

(Being old SUCKS, but it is more gooooder than the alternative).
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Here to learn
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I say KUDOS to you! I also chose to purchase a PLB a couple years back, shortly after the three hikers on Mt. Hood died. Recent news stories of people who died unnecessarily for lack of a PLB have just reinforced that decision. Sometimes people criticize me for my decision to carry a PLB as though I'll be irresponsible because I have it. To me, my PLB is not my plan B or my plan C...it's Plan Z. I will make the same decisions in the wilderness with it that I would without it- and I have a low tolerance for risk of injury or death so I am pretty conservative. I carry plenty of gear any time, even on day hikes, to make a camp and spend the night and survive for days. I have gear for first aid, and gear for self-rescue. I would exhaust all my means before I would ever consider asking other people to put their own safety at risk for my own. But it's nice to know that if I get into a situation where I simply cannot self-rescue that it's there. It goes with me on every hiking, ATV and snowmobiling excursion I do and even in the Jeep if I'm going somewhere remote. Just in case. My choice was the McMurdo FastFind. At the time I purchased it, it was the smallest and best price.
 

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Garbage Collector
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11,363 Posts
I am not interested in being found, but I do see the usefulness of the beacons for those that go into the wilderness and may need rescued.

Another tool to add to the kit.
 
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Back of beyond!
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I just picked up my new Personal Locator Beacon, the ACR "ResQLink" model# PLB-375 and it is small but powerful.

I had a difficult ego Resistance to this decision. I did not want to accept that I might need to someday be rescued. In more than 40+ years of professionally guiding others, and thousands of solo expeditions in Alaska, I had always relied on myself to rescue myself, no matter what the trauma.

(Being old SUCKS, but it is more gooooder than the alternative).
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I'm getting "old" myself. I'll be 58 in less than 2 weeks. However, I actually LIKE the fact that I'm not totally safe when out back of beyond.
Just like camping in bear and mountain lion territory, the fact that there IS risk when in the wilderness adds spice and true adventure.

That's NOT to say that I take unnecessary risks. I simply prefer going out in the far away places "old school" style.
Compass, knives, guns, fire starters, first aid kit, etc., and other BASIC gear is all I take. No high tech other than a cell phone.
 

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I'm 55. I got a SPOT locator to keep my wife off my back when I go into the backcountry. Otherwise she imagines all kinds of horrible scenarios. I power it up before I go to make sure batteries are still good, otherwise it stays off and in the pack. I can optionally couple it to my GPS but I almost never take a GPS with me.

I live in SoCal so there really isn't anywhere I could go that I'm more than a long day's hike from civilization. I suppose I could get injured and not be able to make that hike but since I always leave a map and stick close to my route, the SAR folks would find me real quick if I didn't get home that night. (Trust me. There is zero chance of me getting "lost".) That map leaves me with more confidence than any locator ever could. You can't turn on a locator beacon if you are unconscious or separated from it by a fall, etc.

The absolute fastest way to grab attention out here is a good smokey fire. (Be very sure it doesn't get out of control.) You'll have a forest service helicopter out to your location VERY quick.
 

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Trust me. There is zero chance of me getting "lost"..
A bit of "can't happen to me" mentality, eh? Everybody who catches themselves believing that should have an alarm go off in their mind IMHO...

Having safety gear shows experience, but being very experienced is a risk just as is having no experience is.
 

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Bergmann Field-Craft, AK
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112 Posts
I just picked up my new Personal Locator Beacon, the ACR "ResQLink" model# PLB-375 and it is small but powerful.

I had a difficult ego Resistance to this decision. I did not want to accept that I might need to someday be rescued. In more than 40+ years of professionally guiding others, and thousands of solo expeditions in Alaska, I had always relied on myself to rescue myself, no matter what the trauma.

(Being old SUCKS, but it is more gooooder than the alternative).
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Old has nothing to do with it, old timer..;-)..I'm here in Ak too and thought i was good to go and id never need one..Well a simple spoiled can of sardines almost did me in with a serious case of food poisoning... I got out one text message before my cell died. It was a duplicate text that was sent to two people but it still took them a day to get to me by army SAR chopper and by time they found me i couldn't remember a thing or where i was..I wished i had one of them that day..

I will be getting one before the winter season starts for me..:thumb:
 

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Bergmann Field-Craft, AK
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112 Posts
I'm 55. I got a SPOT locator to keep my wife off my back when I go into the backcountry. Otherwise she imagines all kinds of horrible scenarios. I power it up before I go to make sure batteries are still good, otherwise it stays off and in the pack. I can optionally couple it to my GPS but I almost never take a GPS with me.

I live in SoCal so there really isn't anywhere I could go that I'm more than a long day's hike from civilization. I suppose I could get injured and not be able to make that hike but since I always leave a map and stick close to my route, the SAR folks would find me real quick if I didn't get home that night. (Trust me. There is zero chance of me getting "lost".) That map leaves me with more confidence than any locator ever could. You can't turn on a locator beacon if you are unconscious or separated from it by a fall, etc.

The absolute fastest way to grab attention out here is a good smokey fire. (Be very sure it doesn't get out of control.) You'll have a forest service helicopter out to your location VERY quick.


He's in Alaska. You Sir are not. Come to our land and you'll eat those words with that attitude..:taped:
 
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I just picked up my new Personal Locator Beacon, the ACR "ResQLink" model# PLB-375 and it is small but powerful.

I had a difficult ego Resistance to this decision. I did not want to accept that I might need to someday be rescued. In more than 40+ years of professionally guiding others, and thousands of solo expeditions in Alaska, I had always relied on myself to rescue myself, no matter what the trauma.

(Being old SUCKS, but it is more gooooder than the alternative).
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Good having a PLB is smart. Which is also gooder than the alternitive.
 

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I don't get why anyone would have ego resistance to carrying a PLB. Anyone could need help. Ego resistance is unwise, that's obvious though huh ok anyway looks like my option for PLB will not be the spot, which will have the rescue insurance with the yearly sub fee. Sooooo maybe it's here in the forum I'll read some and see, but how does one go about getting rescue insurance?
 

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Old has nothing to do with it, old timer..;-)..I'm here in Ak too and thought i was good to go and id never need one..Well a simple spoiled can of sardines almost did me in with a serious case of food poisoning... I got out one text message before my cell died. It was a duplicate text that was sent to two people but it still took them a day to get to me by army SAR chopper and by time they found me i couldn't remember a thing or where i was..I wished i had one of them that day..

I will be getting one before the winter season starts for me..:thumb:
Oh man, food poisoning! Dang I got it from one of those pre made cans of chicken salad one time cripes ! It was bad
 

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I don't get why anyone would have ego resistance to carrying a PLB. Anyone could need help. Ego resistance is unwise, that's obvious though huh ok anyway looks like my option for PLB will not be the spot, which will have the rescue insurance with the yearly sub fee. Sooooo maybe it's here in the forum I'll read some and see, but how does one go about getting rescue insurance?
Some of us just don't like nosy parkers and buttinskys, and the PLB invites both. However, unless it is required that I turn it on when I go into the woods, it may be useful. Don't see that it does a great deal more than a cell phone when you've got tower, however.
 

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In Memory
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Personal locator beacons are all well & good IF (BIG IF).

IF...resources are available to find/help/retrieve you.

If not, you are on your own.

Whenever I plan an "outing" into far off the beaten track rugged/isolated country.

For my family, I plat my movement schedule & planned route on USGS topo maps.
Also project and overlay the same on google earth aerial print outs.
Also make a list of area "agencies" that are capable of S&R for that area.
With those, at least they know about where I "should" be, if they don't hear from me & who to contact.

Last but not least, I pack an Iridium Sat phone.
 

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I just picked up my new Personal Locator Beacon, the ACR "ResQLink" model# PLB-375 and it is small but powerful.

I had a difficult ego Resistance to this decision. I did not want to accept that I might need to someday be rescued. In more than 40+ years of professionally guiding others, and thousands of solo expeditions in Alaska, I had always relied on myself to rescue myself, no matter what the trauma.

(Being old SUCKS, but it is more gooooder than the alternative).
__________________
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Technology has enabled us to live better, be smarter, and conduct ourselves with a greater degree of safety. Look at it not so much as a rescuer, but rather as a communication method to relieve the tension of those that worry about us. It's a "more better" way to live.
 

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Better to have one and not need it than not have one and need it.

If you have one, you have the choice as to whether or not to use it. If you don't, well, you have no choice, you won't be using it.
 

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I'm getting "old" myself. I'll be 58 in less than 2 weeks. However, I actually LIKE the fact that I'm not totally safe when out back of beyond.
Just like camping in bear and mountain lion territory, the fact that there IS risk when in the wilderness adds spice and true adventure.

That's NOT to say that I take unnecessary risks. I simply prefer going out in the far away places "old school" style.
Compass, knives, guns, fire starters, first aid kit, etc., and other BASIC gear is all I take. No high tech other than a cell phone.
The naivety and false bravado is breathtaking. There is no compass, knife, gun, fire starter, first aid kit, etc., that will help you if you have a heart attack in the wilderness.

You have a fighting chance if you have a PLB and deploy it. Having said that, maybe it's best that you don't take a PLB so SAR resources and efforts are focused on those who don't view the lack of preparation as spice and true adventure.
 

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In Memory
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By no means am I knocking PLB's. However, with a SAT PHONE, one can call S&R (if need be), rely your circumstance, gps position & condition. Only downside is the expense of the phone & plan you go with, as none are inexpensive.

Another thing I do as prep before a trip into harms way is determine where cell phone repeaters are (if any are in the area), plus their GPS position & plat them on my mapping. That way, if need be I can alter my route to get within line of sight of one, if the need arises.

Nothing better than a text message, email or the sound of your voice to put at ease any family worrying about you.
 

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Bear Magnet
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I have a similar technology 6.8 albeit mine is also an avalanche beacon and I learned the hard way many years ago not to trust the alkaline or rechargeable batteries. :eek:
I now only purchase and install the lithium batteries 'cause they just don't fail. They are pricey but they also work well in sub zero temperatures.:thumb:

Wyldman out.:D:
 
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