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The idea is to plant a small plot of these, kinda like grapes. The peppers can be ground into powder and used as a spice. Unlike jalapeños or other types of peppers, these do not have to be replanted every year.

If you have a retreat, consider planting some of these peppers close by, let them grow and see what happens.

Being from the southern states and Mexico, these plants might not tolerate cold very well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiltepin

Chiltepin is a wild chile pepper that grows in Mexico and the southwestern United States. It is sometimes called the "mother of all peppers," because it is thought to be the oldest species in the Capsicum genus.

The chiles are extremely hot, rating 50,000 to 100,000 Scoville units, but the heat quickly dissipates.

The Wild Chile Botanical Area in the Coronado National Forest near Tucson, Arizona has the largest population of chiltepin chile peppers north of Mexico. It is the state native pepper of Texas.

Chiltepins are one of the few crops in the world which are harvested in the wild rather than cultivated. (Others are mushrooms, piñon nuts, Brazil nuts, and some wild rice.)In the wild, piquins can grow 6 feet high or more, and in the greenhouse they have grown 15 feet high in one season. However, some varieties have a prostrate habit, spreading across the ground like a ground cover.
 

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Hunter/Farmer
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I used to have those birds eye peppers popping up all over the place. Mockingbirds eat and spread them all over the place. For some reason they have disappeared.
They are hot, one pepper to a gallon of chili for me.:D:
 
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