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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always used the peat pots that you can get at any store as a second step from seedling to outside plant. Well today I was cleaning up a raised bed that had Kale last year. I found that out of 6 kale plants 4 never got their roots out of the peat pot! They were all wrapped up in coffee cup sized area. The 2 that were able to break the pot had a root spread the size of a dinner plate.
So has anybody else had thisw problem?
I guess Ill have to cut or tear the pot open when I plant them but I was under the ASSUMPTION the pot was supposed to go away into magic fairy dust or something! Oh well just wanted to share with ya.
 

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Survive... for what?
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I had problems with that... I figured the roots would grow right through, ended up with 2 stunted tomato plants. I just cut a crosshair in the bottom and fold the flaps away.
 

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Yeah, that's fairly common because many roots begin to turn and twist when they hit the sides of the peat pot instead of piercing it and become root bound, which only makes the problem worse. It's a good idea to run a razor knife down the sides of the peat pot in about five or six places when transplanting. Some just do a simple X in the bottom of the pot.
 

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I own a commercial greenhouse business and have been experimenting for several years with alternatives to all those plastic pots typically sen in greenhouses. I have tried peat pots, coir (cocnut fiber), paper fiber, and straw pots in hopes of finding a biodegradable alternative. So far the best growth seems to come from the coir pots. Roots penetrate it easily yet it holds together before the pot is inserted into the ground. Try Gardener's Supply or some of the other internet gardening sites for cori pots.
 

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Ringin Your Gong From 600
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One trick I learned (for any potted plant going into the ground or a bigger pot) was to take a knife and slice it down the edge every so often to stop the roots getting all bound-n-wound. Best of luck. :thumb:
 

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I usually start with paper cups and go into COWPOTS, I freaking LOVE Cowpots, the are all natural, biodegradable, and if I grow a plant in a traditional pot and one in a cowpot the plants are literally two times bigger by time I put them in the ground. I am not one to pimp a product by a single manufacturer but these guys are great, good customer service and a great deal.

They always break through, always, I have not had a single issue and I didnt cut mine, the owner said it was the first watering in the ground that makes the pot damp enough to start degrading it, then the roots eat through and the pots help fertilize your garden as well.

Here is a brief description from their site of what a cowpot is.

An exciting high-performing alternative to plastic and peat pots. CowPots™, manure-fiber based seed starter pots, are made by American farmers for plant lovers everywhere. These earth-friendly “pots you plant” are made with biodegradable, 100% renewable composted cow manure.

* Planted pots biodegrade fast
* Roots easily penetrate CowPots
* Healthier roots = stronger plants
* Enriches garden soil, naturally!

The CowPot manufacturing process removes all weeds, pathogens and odor. All that’s left is the natural fiber and goodness of manure:
the perfectly plantable pot!

www.cowpot.com

 

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Tough Chick
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I used cardboard egg cartons for my marigolds this year and plan to use them for all my seedlings next year. The roots were already poking through when I got to transplanting outside time. (I did go ahead and stick a finger through the wet bottom of the seedlings before I planted, though...habit I learned from my mom.) Plus, they are free with the purchase of a dozen eggs. Free is good.
 

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If you read the planting instructions on many veggie plants like the ones sold at Wally World they will tell you to remove and peel away the peat pots. I do this on all of mine and no longer have the issues that you are mentioning.

However the "Jiffy Peat Pots" I have started all my corn plants in doesnt mention a word about doing that on thier instruction. They suggest planting the pot and all. But gven the past experience I have had in peeling the pots away and placing the root ball of the plant into the ground without the pot, this is what I will be doing when its time to put them in the ground.
 

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I abandoned the use of peat seed starters. I just save a couple of 5 gal pails of dirt from the garden before the ground freezes in the fall, and start my seeds in plastic cups. The roots never seemed to spread out right with the peat. I used to use the add water peat pellets, then put them into cups of dirt after they were a few inches tall. Now I just skip the first step.
 

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I abandoned the use of peat seed starters. I just save a couple of 5 gal pails of dirt from the garden before the ground freezes in the fall, and start my seeds in plastic cups. The roots never seemed to spread out right with the peat. I used to use the add water peat pellets, then put them into cups of dirt after they were a few inches tall. Now I just skip the first step.

By not using sterilized soil or soilless mix you do run the risk of a fungi or some other soil-borne pathogen destroying your seed and/or seedlings in the closed sytem of your plastic cup. Just a heads up.
 

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I used cardboard egg cartons for my marigolds this year and plan to use them for all my seedlings next year. The roots were already poking through when I got to transplanting outside time. (I did go ahead and stick a finger through the wet bottom of the seedlings before I planted, though...habit I learned from my mom.) Plus, they are free with the purchase of a dozen eggs. Free is good.
Egg cartons is what I use also. I just cut the sectons when it is time to plant and pop them in the hole. so far no problems.

I have thought about any chemicals that might be present in the carton but, alas, chemicals is every where, even me. In the garden I do not pee.

later
wayne
 

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The peat pots break down much faster if they are very wet when put in the ground. I usually wet them well, then stick my finger in through the bottom; they almost all are gone by the fall.
 

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Peat pots don't always break down; remember this stuff comes from bogs where it's been sitting in the muck, wet, for a long, long time.

If you want to be frugal about it, make your pots out of newspapers and fill them with dirt. Newspaper, once wet, deteriorates pretty fast. And worms like to eat it and will leave their castings in the vicinity of your fruit and veg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So has anybody had any luck with that news paper pot maker thing that you can buy. You know the little wooden cup and a plug type thing that I guess you just smash together?
 
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