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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Depressing as Hell to watch. 50 something year old men and women, liad off for months, trying against all odds to find work; unable to come to grips with the fact that THINGS JUST MIGHT NOT GET BETTER, AND THAT THEY NEED TO RADICALLY DOWNSIZE THEIR LIFESTYLES!

As the U.S. unemployment rate hits a 25-year high and the Dow Jones Industrial Average hits a six-year low, award-winning FRONTLINE producer Ofra Bikel chronicles the recession's impact on one unlikely American neighborhood -- New York's Upper East Side.

In Close to Home, Bikel sets up her cameras in the hair salon she's patronized for 20 years. It's an intimate space where she has come to know well the surprisingly diverse clientele -- from athletic trainers and housewives to high-end bankers, actors and opera singers. Despite expectations that this neighborhood is a secure bastion of privilege, these days, when clients get in the chair, they offer a window into the country in recession: Some are broke, others don't have a plan, and they're all looking to commiserate.

Deborah Boles, the owner and sole hairdresser at Deborah Hair Designs, started the business in 1985. "I wanted a place where people can go and they can feel comfortable," she says. "They know they belong here." But it's all on the line with the current downturn -- clients come less often; some skip coloring or skip the trim -- and as Deborah watches neighboring businesses go under, she wonders how long she can survive.

Barbara, Deborah's sister, helps out at the salon, but she has been struggling with her own economic crisis. After buying a home in Florida at the height of the market, she now has a subprime mortgage that she can no longer afford. Unable to pay the exorbitant interest, she has had to take in four tenants, each with their own stories of foreclosure and unemployment.
Video: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/closetohome/view/?utm_campaign=viewpage&utm_medium=grid&utm_source=grid
 

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myheart'sinthehighlands
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This story reminds me of the "Great Depression". There were so many people renting rooms out in their homes just to be able to keep them and make ends meet. Same thing is going on right now. I feel as though we ARE in a Depression no matter what the Guberment says.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This story reminds me of the "Great Depression". There were so many people renting rooms out in their homes just to be able to keep them and make ends meet. Same thing is going on right now. I feel as though we ARE in a Depression no matter what the Guberment says.
That woman in the video, the one in Florida who's renting out rooms in her house (she had 5 or 6 tenents!) was noted to be at least $11,000 behind on her mortgage and about to be foreclosed on and evicted. It's not only her thats going to be evicted but those tenents of hers as well. Where do these people go when they have no place to go? How long before one of them "snaps" and takes out some politician or blows up the bank holding his/her mortgage?

What got me really riled up was the HR guy, layed off for the past 16 months, still living in his large colonial house, still driving around in his Mercedes, looking for the same type of work, same level of pay, that he's accustomed to...

When I saw him drive up to Danbury, CT from New York, just to attend a "networking" workshop, I wanted to get up and slap the guy to knock some sense into him. He said he to goes to these workshops to "network" and showcase his skills and experience to potential employers.

The only problem is that there are no employers at these workshops; only other unemployed job seekers. Each one gets up and tells the room of their experience with "being in charge of 3000 employeees of xyz company, etc..."

It's all just one big circle jerk and these people are too stupid to realize it. They'll realize it when they too run out of money to live on and find themselves out on the streets.
 
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