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Another thing to consider by freshly grinding wheat berries to make into pasta (or bread or whatever) is nutrition and flavor.
A properly LT stored wheat berry will retain greater nutritional value than flour processed into pasta then stored. During troubled times nutrition will be as important as hollow calories. In addition, pasta from freshly ground flour has superior flavor. Think, difference between fresh ground spice vs pre-ground. But there is no accounting for tastes.
It’s important to be able to create meals from base ingredients and not rely on items prepackaged/ processed. So consider homemade pasta as a “type” of pasta for LTS. Also remember it’s not one or the other, pre made for convenience and homemade for superior taste, nutrition, and versatility.

Ny Min - Just a FYI, you don’t need a fancy pasta machine/ extruder to make pasta, roll it out and cut.
 

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My personal observation is most americans eat pasta smothered in sauce,there is no "flavor" in pasta,and texture is more a factor of how it is cooked,and the shape,not quality
Now if I steam a few clams ,add some butter,garlic,and white wine over angel hair,I won't taste the pasta,and its easy to over cook the thin pasta no matter what the cost.

Very few people eat pasta as a stand alone,but use it as a vehicle to carry the sauce.
Based on your view then IMHO I would go with ramen noodles.
Yes, you can eat raw ramen noodles, as they are already cooked before they are dried anyways, which makes them no more unhealthy for you than if you cooked them as normal.
Decades ago in my college days we would use raw ramen as a snack when studying since we had no time to cook.
 

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Based on your view then IMHO I would go with ramen noodles.
Yes, you can eat raw ramen noodles, as they are already cooked before they are dried anyways, which makes them no more unhealthy for you than if you cooked them as normal.
Decades ago in my college days we would use raw ramen as a snack when studying since we had no time to cook.
At one time I worked with a lady who spent a while in prison. She would bust up a bag of ramen, sprinkle it with hot sauce and a bit of the seasoning and shake it all up. She called it prison popcorn. She also knew how to make no-bake brownies out of finely crushed ramen, powdered coffee creamer, a Hershey bar and a few other ingredients I have forgotten. I didn't much care for her popcorn, it was a texture thing, but those brownies were actually good.
 

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Elbows
Spaghetti
Egg Noodles
Lasagna
Pasta


Most all stored on original packaging, in 27quart tubs.
Some is stored in 80quart jars, vacuum sealed.

Store some mac an cheese. Not much, as the cheese packets go rancid.
 

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I keep many stashes of bricks with sceens and small sheets of metal stashed, that way as long as there or twigs and branch ends. My water filters will provide an endless supply of water. I by all kinds of pasta, angel hair spaghetti, grits, rice, etc. Pasta takes space to store, so it gets vacuum sealed and storrd, all over. Buy whatever is currently on sale and cheap. I can gtow unlimited veggies and raise critters, if I have any to raise. I dont have the acres to grow wheat, tu hr facilities to process hug quantities to make huge quantities of pasta i buy it. As long as I have a drill, electric or handcrank, my homemade whet mill works. Easy to make, easy to fix.

Pasta......difficult. buy whrner, however, whatever......store carefully and in several spots. It keeps you alive. I store iy in water filtration buckets with water filters and spices and a ziplock of bic lighters. Grab and go. M uh favore hobby is eating every day. Pasta is a great start.....ANY kind of pasta.
 

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Regarding ramen noodles:

They’re not appropriate for LONG term storage as is the topic of the thread. The noodles are fried in oil. That oil will go rancid in time and therefore not good for LTS.
Yes fat in any food tend to reduce shelf life. This is more DEEP Pantry. With any old becoming animal feed because it is cheap.
However,freeze fats and they can become long term!
 

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Ny Min - Just a FYI, you don’t need a fancy pasta machine/ extruder to make pasta, roll it out and cut.
You don't have to have a machine to make pasta, agreed, but it makes the job faster and easier, particularly if you are talking spaghetti or linguini, and the pasta more consistent. It's handy for turning out crackers in volume as well. And for producing macaroni and such shapes, you do need an extruder. :)
 

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Regarding ramen noodles:

They’re not appropriate for LONG term storage as is the topic of the thread. The noodles are fried in oil. That oil will go rancid in time and therefore not good for LTS.
If you have stored spaghetti and baking soda, you can produce your own ramen noodles with or without added oil.
 

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Agree with most that the shape is less important than they type and how you store it. Personally 98% of my stored pasta is in the form of Spaghetti / Fettuccine, and I ususally try to buy it in bulk or soft packs rather than boxes. For storage I Vacuum seal it several pounds to a pack which is very compact, bug and critter resistant since it doesn't smell like food stored in totes etc for added protection. I do keep some macaroni style noodles and for those I open the box and put the contents in a Zip Lock squeezing out as much of the air as I can, then I reseal the box.

The biggest reasons I generally keep away from the more bulky forms of pasta is due to storage space and because vacuum sealed spaghetti has very minimal air with it and I feel that that does both reduce degradation and also preserves flavor / texture a little better.

I also try and keep things split in about thirds as far as dried staples goes between Pasta, Rice and Beans (not including four instant potatoes etc.)

One other thing that both keeps well and is very valuable in stretching your supplies / meals is Corn Starch, which few people mention or think about as a little Corn Starch added to any broth or sauce (esp if watery) will turn whatever your making into something that feels much more hearty and satisfying, and it also keeps very well in when stored.. Just a thought.
 

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The predominant brand I found in Italian supermarkets and stores in Italy was the Barilla brand. Same as they sell here, angel hair is a favorite for backpacking because it cooks the fastest uses the least fuel, kind of justifies it in general, but we collect the whole set as well as make our own, which we just did for the Lasagne we made for Ringraziemento!
 

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I'm a whole-grain person, including pasta. I like the Gia Russa and Barilla 100% whole-grain durum wheat spaghetti and other pastas the best. (I think De Cecco is not quite as good when it comes to whole grain.)
 

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Really, anything but the gluten free stuff. Regular wheat pasta can be used for many things. You can use it in soups as well. Broken spaghetti noodles can be used to make noodle soup of pretty much any kind. You can also use your noodle pasta of choice to make tuna noodle/chicken noodle hotdish. Elbow mac can be used to make chili.

Rotini? Besides mac n cheese, which you can use a can of Campbell's cheddar or nacho cheese soup to make it, you can create homemade minestrone soup with rotini. You just need a can of kidney beans and some misc veggies.

Various other shapes, hey, it's food. Put some protein of choice, tomato sauce, and cheese on it. Really any ground meat will work. You can also put canned white beans with pasta and it will be ok as a protein source. You can also always make pasta salad & use pantry stuff to do so. Also, fettuccini/linguini/angel hair/spaghetti goes well with canned seafood and canned alfredo sauce. Even canned shrimp is good with it.

Why I stock regular and not gluten free? Besides the higher price, the gluten free is weird to cook. Boil it too long and it's blechy. But the boiling point is shorter than regular pasta.
 
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