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I'd like to pick y'alls brains - what type of pasta do you store for LTS and why?

Usually I buy elbows, shells, or rotini. But my teen asked why not buy spaghetti or linguine as those pack better. I don't normally buy those just because of personal preference, but she's got a point. So I'm curious what types of pasta others store & why those ones?
 

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Many people think about this the wrong way.
1) What is your fuel source and amount. Pasta requires heating water.
2) What is your water source and amount. No water = no cooked pasta. It also determine what you do with waste water after cooking.
3) What are you adding to it?
“Different pasta shapes and styles add a good contrast in texture to the sauce you're using.” Not only that, using the wrong noodle with your sauce can cause one or the other to get “lost” or “overwhelmed” in the dish. Always use the Right Noodle for the Job.
4) If baking the pasta
Soak—don't cook—the pasta while you make the sauce.
Most baked pasta recipes (even Genius ones) tell you to boil the pasta until just shy of al dente. That's why we were astounded (but not surprised) when J. Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats and author of The Food Lab, came up with a better way to do things. Don't boil your pasta at all: Simply soak it in hot, salted water for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until al dente.
5) What to do with left over pasta water?
Use it to make your bread. You have to add water to make bread and some salty water is ok for this.
Use it to cook grains such as rice. Usually, you add salt to water in order to boil the water to cook rice or pasta. Adding salt to water adds flavor to the water, which is absorbed by the food. Salt enhances the ability of chemoreceptors in the tongue to detect molecules that are perceived through the sense of taste.
 

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A pound of pasta is a pound of pasta. We stock it in all shapes and sizes. We also stock sauces and such to make quick meals. Pasta, sauce, water, meat (if you like..) and heat. Will break up the monotony of beans, rice, corn, and bread.

Store what you will eat more of. Do you currently cook with more spaghetti type pasta or with more elbows and such? Store more of what you currently use and call it good. We "dry can" all of it for long term storage even though it will likely be used in a year or two.
 

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I have a little angel hair and regular spaghetti but mostly use thin spaghetti. This pan fries well for Asian food. The garofolo brand at Costco works very well but any brand seems ok.
Cooking method can save time and energy and still turn out a superior product. Alton Brown starts with cold water, just a couple quarts.
This also leaves a particularly starchy pasta water left for using in sauce.
 

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Indefatigable
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I would say we store about half spaghetti and half of various other shapes. Even better, simple ingredients and a manual maker + some practice and you can have fresh. The same for noodles. My soba noodles might be a little ugly but they taste good. And let's not forget all the good things you can do with dumplings.
 

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We use mostly spaghetti noodles but also have linguine, fettuccine, penne,salad mac, mac elbows, manicotti, lasagna, egg noodles, tri-color rotini, jumbo shells, and orzo. Probably have about 25 pounds total as well as a pasta roller to make our own. Used to have an extruder to make lasagna and macaroni but it burned up in one of the fires.
 

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I'd like to pick y'alls brains - what type of pasta do you store for LTS and why?

Usually I buy elbows, shells, or rotini. But my teen asked why not buy spaghetti or linguine as those pack better. I don't normally buy those just because of personal preference, but she's got a point. So I'm curious what types of pasta others store & why those ones?
Compliments to your teen, SR.

If/when a required evacuation the better packed can accompany prepper. The 55 gal drum of homemade Spagheti-Os might not fit in pickup.
 

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Many people think about this the wrong way.
1) What is your fuel source and amount. Pasta requires heating water.
2) What is your water source and amount. No water = no cooked pasta. It also determine what you do with waste water after cooking.
3) What are you adding to it?
“Different pasta shapes and styles add a good contrast in texture to the sauce you're using.” Not only that, using the wrong noodle with your sauce can cause one or the other to get “lost” or “overwhelmed” in the dish. Always use the Right Noodle for the Job.
4) If baking the pasta
Soak—don't cook—the pasta while you make the sauce.
Most baked pasta recipes (even Genius ones) tell you to boil the pasta until just shy of al dente. That's why we were astounded (but not surprised) when J. Kenji López-Alt of Serious Eats and author of The Food Lab, came up with a better way to do things. Don't boil your pasta at all: Simply soak it in hot, salted water for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until al dente.
5) What to do with left over pasta water?
Use it to make your bread. You have to add water to make bread and some salty water is ok for this.
Use it to cook grains such as rice. Usually, you add salt to water in order to boil the water to cook rice or pasta. Adding salt to water adds flavor to the water, which is absorbed by the food. Salt enhances the ability of chemoreceptors in the tongue to detect molecules that are perceived through the sense of taste.
I stock barelli pasta- elbow, flat , thin spaghetti ( 60-70%), and rotini. Usually pack a bucket with bags of beans or boxes of spagethi and pour the elbow around it. Sams s it close to$1/ lb, and 1 lb packages maybe found for sale close to that.

coworker who is a foodie and married to a South Jearsy Italian says Barrelli is the bare minimum grade of pasta they will buy. Works for me.

space isn’t that big of an issue to not use the kids favorite shapes. I stack 60 5 gallon buckets in 48x40 and still put a few boxes on top
 

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Wrong Side of Heaven
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I do all shapes and sizes... Dont hard pack it as lots of sharp edges and pointy on some that can puncture the mylar bag,

I tend to leave extra atmosphere in them so when the O2 absorber removes the oxygen there is still a good nitrogen buffer to let it rattle. Something like a bag of potato chips.
 

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I stock barelli pasta- elbow, flat , thin spaghetti ( 60-70%), and rotini. Usually pack a bucket with bags of beans or boxes of spagethi and pour the elbow around it. Sams s it close to$1/ lb, and 1 lb packages maybe found for sale close to that.

coworker who is a foodie and married to a South Jearsy Italian says Barrelli is the bare minimum grade of pasta they will buy. Works for me.

space isn’t that big of an issue to not use the kids favorite shapes. I stack 60 5 gallon buckets in 48x40 and still put a few boxes on top
Pearls before swine! Most will not know a good grade of pasta from a bad one. They go by cost when pasta is one of the cheapest items you can buy. Quality of grain used makes a big difference in flavor, texture, etc. If using a deep pantry, try to focus on quality. If just stocking for SHTF then going for cheapest is one option many will take.
 

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long term storage - NOT a daily usage pantry >>> spaghetti strands - used to stock elbow pasta for mac & cheese for the kids ....

pasta is pasta - you stock for easiest packing - why build in wasted space just to eat pasta in a different form? >>> need to get real about survival and start worrying about having enough food and less about nicey nice accommodating ....
 

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long term storage - NOT a daily usage pantry >>> spaghetti strands - used to stock elbow pasta for mac & cheese for the kids ....

pasta is pasta - you stock for easiest packing - why build in wasted space just to eat pasta in a different form? >>> need to get real about survival and start worrying about having enough food and less about nicey nice accommodating ....
I prep so I DO have a choice. Rule #32 - Enjoy the little things.
 

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Pearls before swine! Most will not know a good grade of pasta from a bad one. Quality of grain used makes a big difference in flavor, texture, etc. If using a deep pantry, try to focus on quality. If just stocking for SHTF then going for cheapest is one option many will take.
My personal observation is most americans eat pasta smothered in sauce,there is no "flavor" in pasta,and texture is more a factor of how it is cooked,and the shape,not quality
Now if I steam a few clams ,add some butter,garlic,and white wine over angel hair,I won't taste the pasta,and its easy to over cook the thin pasta no matter what the cost.

Very few people eat pasta as a stand alone,but use it as a vehicle to carry the sauce.
 

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KISS (keep it simple …..)

Already have wheat berries and salt in LTS, chickens for eggs is a cornerstone on the homestead, and a bit of water and presto you have pasta.

 

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Pantry shelf life of standard flour-and-water pastas like spaghetti and macaroni is 50% longer than that of egg noodles and vegetable pastas (which are both the easiest types to make yourself). Long-term storage life will similarly differ, and whole-grain pastas will not store as long as white-flour pastas either. Some gluten-free pastas may have a very short shelf life if they contain ingredients such as flax.

As for making it yourself, presto, if you need to first grind your flour from wheat berries (which should be durum wheat berries*), make your pasta dough, extrude it, and possibly completely dry some or all of it for later use, there won't be much too "presto" about the process. Having dry premade pasta in storage is therefore going to make good sense to many when it comes to being able to prepare quick and easy meals when they have many other things to do requiring more time and energy than usual. .

For myself, I have a pasta machine that easily turns out spaghetti, linguini, noodles, lasagna, etc. but does not have an extruder for fancy shapes. So my storage tends to slant more toward those. Although for many Americans, any pasta is the same, and all are to be slopped with the same tomato sauce a la Chef Boyardee, different shapes hold different sauces differently, and therefore each Italian dish has its preferred pasta/pastas to be used in making it. If it don't matter to you, it don't matter to you, but some of us don't consider orzo, macaroni, shells, rigatoni, lasagna, linguini, etc. as totally interchangeable even though nutrition is the same.

Fresh pasta definitely has a flavor, but loses flavor as it ages. Like 10-year-old coffee, 10-year-old pasta will still taste fine to some, but way over the hill to others. As always, there's no accounting for tastes, consult your own.

I would say store what you ordinarily use in the quantities you ordinarily go through it. Most people store oatmeal even though it takes far more space per pound than wheat berries. Space occupied is only one criterion when deciding what to store.

* Hard red and white wheats make poor pasta and tough pastries, just as soft wheat and durum wheat make poor yeast breads. Hence the preference for eating pasta and bulgur in geographic areas where durum wheat is the type that grows well (and biscuits, quick breads, cakes, and pastries where it's soft wheat).
 
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