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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Paracord 1100
Today I saw some Paracord 1100. That insinuates that it is twice as strong as Paracord 550. A search on the internet found a guy who tested it and found that the breaking strength of 550 is about 810 lbs, the and the 1100 is about 1600 lbs. That was one test.
It is larger than 550 (about 1/4 inch, with a similar sheath, but has 14 two strand cords inside.
I haven't seen much information on this 1100 cord, but it looks like a very useful item. Does anyone else have any experience with it or information on it?
 

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Patiently Waiting
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Checkout Atwood battle cord. Like 550 cord only 5.6mm with a 2,650lb breaking strength.

It’s got seven strands like 550 only each strand is good for 350lbs, plus whatever the sheath is good for.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Checkout Atwood battle cord. Like 550 cord only 5.6mm with a 2,650lb breaking strength.

It’s got seven strands like 550 only each strand is good for 350lbs, plus whatever the sheath is good for.
An internet search found no reviews on the Atwood Battle cord. Every site has the exact same dialog and specs. Do you know of anyone who has actually tested this cord, or have you? Having been using dozens and dozens of different ropes and cords over the years, it seems unlikely that this cord could have that tested strength considering its size and composition.
Walmart claims to have it, but not here at our Walmart. I will order some to test it. Meanwhile, I am skeptical.
 

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Low speed , High drag
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There is a couple of you tube videos on it.
 

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I prefer to get real paracord which is certified to meet the Mil-C-5040 Type III specification.

The product used by the U.S. Military has a rated strength of 550 lbs and is actually used in the construction of parachutes. It is used to connect the canopy portion of the parachute to the harness and suspension system that the parachutist wears. There are a variety of colors and types of “550 cord” commonly sold. Genuine “550 cord” has a flexible outer cover, which contains 7 white nylon cords which when removed can be used for any purpose that requires a strong thread.

If your supplier cannot show you the lot acceptance certificate you cannot depend on what you are getting being the "real" thing. Here is an example cert so you know what one looks like:

http://www.bestglide.com/images/Parachute Cord Certification.jpg
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I prefer to get real paracord which is certified to meet the Mil-C-5040 Type III specification.
What's your point? We all know what "real" paracord is. There are literally hundreds of posts on paracord 550 here.
The topic of THIS discussion is Paracord 1100. It is larger in diameter and twice as strong as 550. It would be easy to test the strength with a 2 1/2 ton floor jack like one person on YouTube did, IF you were worried about the quality. For the purposes of the uses of paracord for most people here, certification is not going to be an issue.
 

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I've seen it at my local Walmarts, it's in the camping section. It is about double the thickness of 550 and quite a bit stiffer. Advantage over 550? Not many IMO unless you require the additional breaking strength. Too big for cord wraps, shoelaces, bracelets IMO.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've seen it at my local Walmarts, it's in the camping section. It is about double the thickness of 550 and quite a bit stiffer. Advantage over 550? Not many IMO unless you require the additional breaking strength. Too big for cord wraps, shoelaces, bracelets IMO.
Agreed. 1100 would not be used in place of 550, but rather for other applications requiring more strength OR larger diameter. For instance, lashing together tree trunks to make a large raft, securing a boat in a swift river, safety line for several climbers etc. Of course there are other products made for each of those jobs, but they are usually 5-10 times more bulky. Paracord is as strong as nylon rope 4 times the diameter.
 

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Agreed. 1100 would not be used in place of 550, but rather for other applications requiring more strength OR larger diameter. For instance, lashing together tree trunks to make a large raft, securing a boat in a swift river, safety line for several climbers etc. Of course there are other products made for each of those jobs, but they are usually 5-10 times more bulky. Paracord is as strong as nylon rope 4 times the diameter.
My issue with this is that people are going to be tempted to use this for life-safety purposes instead of simply for tag lines, halyards and utility purposes.

There is no test data available as far as its stretch characterics, yield strength or breaking strength and elongation at rupture.

I don't use paracord for purposes for which it isn't designed and neither do most users, but when you have "bigger" ropes the uneducated might be inclined to try it for purposes for which it is unsuited, like lowering a stokes with patient, as a working safety line, for rapelling, etc.
 

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honestly 550 is great dont get me wrong, but for most applications I would honestly prefer something that does not stretch like 550 does and is lighter,

for the the same and more weight bearing capacity as the OPs 1100 thread
you can get kevlar braided cord that is a lot less than half the diameter 2.8mm vs (6.35mm paracord 1/4in) and holds 1500lbs

or for something comparable to 550 cord

1.5mm diameter cord that can carry 500lbs compare that to the 550 cord that is 6.35mm in diameter for the same weight I can carry a LOT more feet of cordage and use for various things and if I need a larger diameter I can alwayse twist it together to make a larger rope or just start with a larger rope.

1000ft of 500lb test Kevlar cord including the spool weighs 22.3 ounces

same spool of 550 cord is 65.6 ounces
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My issue with this is that people are going to be tempted to use this for life-safety purposes instead of simply for tag lines, halyards and utility purposes.

There is no test data available as far as its stretch characterics, yield strength or breaking strength and elongation at rupture.

I don't use paracord for purposes for which it isn't designed and neither do most users, but when you have "bigger" ropes the uneducated might be inclined to try it for purposes for which it is unsuited, like lowering a stokes with patient, as a working safety line, for rapelling, etc.
Agreed, in controlled situations. However, in remote survivalist situations, it may come down to using what you have or being stranded on a cliff face. When the weather clears, I intend to test this 1100 against premium 550. Realistically, if you are lowering a 200lb person down an embankment, and the cord is capable of holding 1600ls, or even 800lbs, and there are no abrasion projections, it should be safe. Usually on a trek, I don't have the room, or the capacity, to carry 100 ft of climbing rope.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
богдан;17220386 said:
for the the same and more weight bearing capacity as the OPs 1100 thread
you can get kevlar braided cord that is a lot less than half the diameter 2.8mm vs (6.35mm paracord 1/4in) and holds 1500lbs
Thanks. I will check out the Kevlar Braided Cord.
 

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Agreed, in controlled situations. However, in remote survivalist situations, it may come down to using what you have or being stranded on a cliff face. When the weather clears, I intend to test this 1100 against premium 550. Realistically, if you are lowering a 200lb person down an embankment, and the cord is capable of holding 1600ls, or even 800lbs, and there are no abrasion projections, it should be safe. Usually on a trek, I don't have the room, or the capacity, to carry 100 ft of climbing rope.
You would be surprised to learn what little movement it takes to add shock loading to a load, that shock loading can add significant amounts of "weight" to the actual load.
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/understanding-shock-loading-bill-teichgraber
"Both rapid acceleration and deceleration of a load can create a shock force that far exceeds the working load limit of the wire rope."

It doesn't take much of a drop or shock to vastly increase the load.
 

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You would be surprised to learn what little movement it takes to add shock loading to a load, that shock loading can add significant amounts of "weight" to the actual load.
Understanding Shock Loading.
"Both rapid acceleration and deceleration of a load can create a shock force that far exceeds the working load limit of the wire rope."

It doesn't take much of a drop or shock to vastly increase the load.
Yeah...I was in scaffolding class and it only takes a drop of 3" and the shock of an average person landing creates a crazy stress on the structure.
 
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