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Which pack material is best in your mind?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for a strong, long-lasting, water-proof pack material. I've researched some like nytaneon, nylon kodra, nylon, and cordura (which seems to be good), but which have been feild tested and chosen as best for you? Thanks
 

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Canuck
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526 Posts
500D cordura nylon:


Durable, lighter than other heavy duty materials and Ive heard it's got something like 80% of the abrasion resistance of 1000D cordura for half the weight.
 

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i like the really dense "balistic" nylon. My pack is a 1050 denier nylon. There is also a material that some of the good pakc are made off that i really like but im not sure what it is. I just dont usually like the really light weight materials because they rip especially with desert plants
 

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Armed Border Collie
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Over the years I have noticed that it is more about the stitching and web-gear that the pack is finished with that determines how well the pack will last. Most commercial Nylon is too light weight and has an issue with cracking in the sun, so it's time exposed to the elements is limited. Some of the heavier weight materials are much too bulky for a normal pack and retain water when they get wet, but are great for protecting stuff like use in gun cases or range bags.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@True Blue...... so what materials with what stitching do you find most effective. Thanks for your previous reply.
 

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Armed Border Collie
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Woodsman, The stitching just needs to be made from the same type of thread as the pack’s fabric material so they stretch and wear at the same rate. Seams should be away from natural wear points (corners, folds and weight bearing panels) or be heavily reinforced with single and doubled-back edge stitching (for more secure edge seams). Generally, single needle stitching throughout will allow the seams to flex and pull, but not unravel if the thread is worn or cut. The better bags should have bar tacks at stress points to prevent the bag from getting pulled apart if overloaded (who doesn’t overload a pack?). I used to buy surplus or cheaper bags and reinforce them. The great bags I wanted where way out of my price range, but now I have Kelty, Blackhawk, 511, UTG (messenger bag) and Camelback bags. They are all well constructed and need very little cleaning up or reinforcing. To do this you will need a long, curved needle, a heavy thread of the appropriate type and a padded glove/needle-nose pliers to pull the needle through. (or a sail repair kit).

The web attachments should be heavy enough to be used, but not so heavy that it is too much effort to attach items. This is a personal choice as is zippers and Velcro closures. I have a love-hate thing going on with elastic, Velcro and string closures since they all tend to wear in slow and when they get just right, they fall apart. Maybe that is just me. I have a number of mediocre bags that I have because they are the right camo pattern for hunting or they where a great deal online, but now I like to look it over well before I drop $150 on a bag I may use a few times. Fortunately, the local LE equipment retailer carries the top brands. (But, I may still buy it online).
 
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