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ladypatriotus.blogspot.co
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all! I just came across this site and am pretty excited. I am wanting a piece of land to go camping on. I'd like to build a small cabin and use the place to get away from it all every once in a while. Plus, I think it would make a darn good BOL if necessary. The plat I am looking at is just a short walk to a lake.

What do you all think of this site, and the financial aspects? Even better, has anyone dealt with them??

Thanks!!!

http://www.ozarkland.com/
 

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Hi all! I just came across this site and am pretty excited. I am wanting a piece of land to go camping on. I'd like to build a small cabin and use the place to get away from it all every once in a while. Plus, I think it would make a darn good BOL if necessary. The plat I am looking at is just a short walk to a lake.

What do you all think of this site, and the financial aspects? Even better, has anyone dealt with them??

Thanks!!!

http://www.ozarkland.com/

Just remember this is Ozark "Mountain" country ....
so it is mostly rock.. there is no dirt around here.. you have to have it hauled in..
and some people thinks dirt is red clay...
 

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ladypatriotus.blogspot.co
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just remember this is Ozark "Mountain" country ....
so it is mostly rock.. there is no dirt around here.. you have to have it hauled in..
and some people thinks dirt is red clay...
Really? Some of the properties in the Ozarks have open pastures. I've camped out here before and it is just so beautiful! I suppose the property I was looking at though might indeed be pretty rocky. THANKS!
 

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You definitely want to visit the property before you commit. Pasture and gardens and the like will make it on some properties. Others will require you to follow some traditional farming techniques: a seed tied between two stones. :thumb:

Many (most? all?) of the properties offered on ozarkland.com are way over priced. Really do your research. Have your soil tested. All standard caveats apply.
 

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Numquam Succumbe
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Hey dood!

My wife and I went through the same stuff when we looked for our lands down here in the Ozarks!

Here's a couple tidbits of advice we've learned:

1. Those "short walk to the lake" houses are mostly in housing communities, and they place a LOT of restrictions on what you can and can't do with your land. And, in some cases, you don't even own the land, you're just buying the house, and then you have to pay rent on the land, even after you own the house!

2. There are a few good pastures 'round these parts, especially up on the line between Fayetteville and Mountain Home, but, for the most part our land is hard to work. Now, don't confuse that with unworkable, it's just gonna be harder. Here is a picture I took of a section of soil I tilled with the hand tiller. You can see all the rocks underneath that you have to contend with. I don't expect the hand tiller will last more than two or three seasons, and plan on getting a small tractor to work the land.



Most of our soil are old mollisols and ultisols, so the soil is very acidic and typically devoid of nutrients, but, again, it just means you've got to work harder to work it. A lot of people lime, which costs money, but you can also do an annual pasture burn to raise the PH of the soil.

The USDA NCRS has a neat website that might be able to help you while you're looking for land: http://soildatamart.nrcs.usda.gov/

The wildlife here is unbelievable, though, so it kind of makes up for the crappy soil. I grew tomato and garlic this year without any fertilizer or pesticides, and they grew phenominal!





I didn't even think they were gonna come up, but we did!

The land is also VERY suited for small animal husbandry. We just ordered a bunch of Delaware peeps, and we're raising rabbits, too! And, our goats LOVE to forage the underbrush of our wooded acres.



(WHAT A PIE!)


In short, the land is extremely hard to work, but not unworkable, the ozarks are BURGEONING with wildlife -to the point that a man could easily feed his family solely by hunting if he were so inclined, and the land is well suited for small animal husbandry!


3. when you're looking for your property, try and buy outside city limits so you don't have to deal with city codes and ordinances! They can cramp your style, even if you think it's a rural city! Harrison, AR is the epicenter for a whole rural region around Northern Arkansas, and they JUST RECENTLY passed a law allowing residences to keep up to three hens each.

4. This is an important one, there will always be something better! When you 're looking for your land, don't just settle on the first thing you like! Write down a list of criteria (our list was 30-some-odd items long) and hold out until you find a property that has all your criteria!

I'm happy to answer any other questions you have and share our Ozark buying experience with you! Just send me a PM! :thumb:
 

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Really? Some of the properties in the Ozarks have open pastures. I've camped out here before and it is just so beautiful! I suppose the property I was looking at though might indeed be pretty rocky. THANKS!
Definitely go look at it first. Im from MO and some of it is farmable, some isnt. Each piece of property just has to be evaluated on its own merits and you need to decide if you can make it work or not.

-Nate
 

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ladypatriotus.blogspot.co
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
twggy, thanks for such great information! I am looking at the MO Ozarks, more in the middle to to the East of Missouri. Their laws concerning farming and animal keeping are far more relaxed, it sounds. I've done camping out this way and it's all extremely rural, no subdivisions anywhere until you get near the Lake of the Ozarks.

I love your pics! tomatoes look fantastic too! And you are right about the Ozarks and wildlife!!
 
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i wouldn't look at any land that comes with HOA type restrictions. if it's my land, other than meeting state/local laws for septic and well, i don't want anyone else telling me what i can or can't do with it.
but that's just me.
 

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We live in the area mentioned. We've found the closer to a lake, the more rock. And the rock does not support much except scrub cedars. A good rule of thumb, when you are looking. The more cedars, the more rocky it is. In our case, we wanted close to the lake,and we got it, but the only way to do any gardening, is with raised beds, or greenhouse.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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My opinion?

"This weeks Featured property" 7.5 acre, all-wooded parcel which features a wet-weather stream and a beautiful mature forest, 3/4-mile from pavement. Asking $30k. [that is $4k/acre]

Notice the warnings about fires. Even 3 days after a campfire, it can still reflash in a breeze and burn down many acres. Drought chased my relatives out from that area many years ago. Droughts are hard to farm in. The land is dry.

In my area, you expect to pay $1k/acre to buy forest land that has water frontage [year-round river, lake or flowing pond]. To go higher than $1k/acre we would expect to see productive farm land [hay, orchards, cleared pasture, etc].

Land without flowing water rarely goes any higher than $500/acre.



Also look at the taxes on various properties:
2.5 acres for $55.75 - $22.30 per acre
4.1 acres for $7.33 - $1.79 per acre
1.37 acres for $113.50 - $82.85 per acre
3.3 acres for $21.01 - $6.37 per acre
5.01 acres for $135.83 - $27.11 per acre
3.9 acres for $41.00 - $10.51 per acre

Actually it is typical to see that kind of wide spread between different townships. Taxes fluctuate a lot with the cost of services each township provides.

We have dense forest land, we pay $1.05/acre in taxes each year. For our property taxes we get a sheriff deputy that drives through our township once/week, weekly garbage pickup, and school bus service with a local school district. There is a volunteer FD, but we do not get forest fires, they are only here for dwellings.

The town to our South has a mil-rate three times higher than ours [so we would pay closer to $3.15/acre if we had bought in that township], but their highschool has a new swimming pool and a 'dive-coach', their town square is alongside the river with a park and a water-fountain playground thingy for children. So you can see why they need the higher property taxes. :)

Our town offers very little, and that is reflected in our taxes.

I would expect any town that charges you more than $3/acre to be providing some really nice services.



I have 1/4 mile of river-frontage, maintained-road frontage with power /phone /DSL, my land was listed for $900/acre.

We have a second adjacent parcel, no waterfrontage, maintained road frontage with power /phone /DSL, it was listed for $350/acre.

Our properties are dense forest: with deer, lots of turkey, and every year either a bear or a moose is harvested on our land.
 

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I live in the area and there is good land in the hills, there is also rocky land. The vegetables and fruits that grow in gardens here taste great. They taste much better than what you buy and it doesn't take a very big garden to grow what a family needs to eat. You will have to water it though. I recommend looking at land in the winter when the leaves are off and the grass is dead and beaten down so you can really see what it looks like. Don't look at it in the spring rainy season when it looks best and everything is lush and green. If you buy small parcels it is going to be 2000 an acre or much more. You will have to buy more than 40 acres to get a good price most of the time.
 
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