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Swamp Yankee
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Discussion Starter #1
I have three apple trees, and this is the first year they've all done really well... except one of them has apple scar.

So I'm canning all of those apples - my first time to try any kind of canning - and I'm using the oven. After cooking the apples and turning them into applesauce, I put it in already-sterilized mason jars, then put the top on, then back in the oven (210 F) for a little while longer.

 

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Bread Baker
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Ok, Ill bite.

The question begs to be asked, are you trying to whip up a homemade batch of botulism?:confused:

You said that this is your first time canning. Why are you oven canning?:confused:

I dont want to put you on the defense, but oven canning has never been a safe reliable way to can anything.
 

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Applesauce doesnt even require a relativaly expensive pressure canner. Only a cheap boiling water canner. I see no valid excuse to not do it the correct way. If money is that tight then any large deep pot can be fashioned into a water bath canner by just making a rack out of jar rings and wire. Dont risk wasting good apples and sickness when the right way is so darn easy.



Chris
 

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Forward, into the fray!
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Lets all go back and admire the science "facts" of the 1920's. Lets see, not washing your face is the cause of teen aged pimples. Washing your hair too often will make it fall out. There are deep canals and rivers criss crossing Mars. Baking food in jars in the oven is a good way of preserving food. Cutting out several ribs and a lung is a cure for Tuberculosis. Man will never run a 4 minute mile. Supersonic air travel will always be science fiction.

Just 'cause your gramma did it (and nobody got sick) doesn't mean you don't know better.
 

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Premium Member
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Ok, Ill bite.

The question begs to be asked, are you trying to whip up a homemade batch of botulism?:confused:

You said that this is your first time canning. Why are you oven canning?:confused:

I dont want to put you on the defense, but oven canning has never been a safe reliable way to can anything.
"...homemade batch of botulism...". :xeye:.....Yup.......:(.

Oven canning is a good way to commit suicide.

Read, believe & follow through.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_02/applesauce.html
 

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Bread Baker
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You mean red eye gravy and country ham? What time is supper? :thumb:
Meh. Im more of a sawmill gravy sort of fella, or a biscuit piled high with country ham, an egg over easy, a slice of cheese, and then a hash brown. You have to unhinge your jaw if you eat at my house. :thumb:

Or country ham and cheese in Grits.

Dang, now im getting hungry.
 

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I've never heard of oven canning. I have only done apples in my All American pressure canner. I don't think boiling water bath canning is going to work for apples--please check the link posted above, and the Ball Blue book. You don't want to get really sick!
 

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I've never heard of oven canning. I have only done apples in my All American pressure canner. I don't think boiling water bath canning is going to work for apples
A boiling water bath absolutely does work for apples. It takes 20 minutes at sea level for sliced apples in a boiling water bath. Sliced apples, apple butter, applesauce--they're all safe to can in a boiling water bath. There's no excuse for playing around with trying to can in an oven when all you're canning is fruit. A boiling water bath is just as easy and much safer.
 

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You talkin' to me?
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A boiling water bath absolutely does work for apples. It takes 20 minutes at sea level for sliced apples in a boiling water bath. Sliced apples, apple butter, applesauce--they're all safe to can in a boiling water bath. There's no excuse for playing around with trying to can in an oven when all you're canning is fruit. A boiling water bath is just as easy and much safer.
Correct, apples contain enough acid to safely water bath can, just like tomatoes and peaches.

Oven canning is just a bad idea in every sense.
 

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Oven canning is only for dry foods. And it's not really canning. It's more just killing any bugs in it and creating a slight vacuum that seals the jar. Good for like rice and flour in small quantities.
Though that was more a thing of the past... before mylar and oxygen obsorbers.
But oven canning isn't going to kill any bacteria.

Sent from my SM-S902L using Tapatalk
 

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Oven canning is only for dry foods. And it's not really canning. It's more just killing any bugs in it and creating a slight vacuum that seals the jar. Good for like rice and flour in small quantities.
Though that was more a thing of the past... before mylar and oxygen obsorbers.
But oven canning isn't going to kill any bacteria.

Sent from my SM-S902L using Tapatalk
Oven canning's also good for dry beans.
 

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I don't regard oven canning as good for dry foods either. Heat is the other big deteriorator of food after air, light, and moisture. Baking your beans 3 years before you bake them is going to reduce their total shelf life and isn't a very good approach nutrition-wise.

Mylar and oxygen absorbers let you store your dry goods dark, oxygen-free, and as cool as possible and also kill insect eggs and insects at every life stage.
 

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Swamp Yankee
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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for all the advice - I went ahead and figured out how to use the pressure cooker instead. I have one and half quarts of applesauce and over a gallon of spiced apples.

What I thought bizarre was after pulling out the last batch from the cooker, the lids were sealed, but the jars were still "boiling". And I mean half an hour later. How does THAT work?
 
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