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I live in a modular double wide and have been getting more and aggravated when I get my light bill. I have an electric furnace, water heater, washer and dryer, and cook stove. My bill during the winter is 200+ and the darn heater kicks on like every 10 minutes. I have wrapped the entire side of the house with thick clear plastic as it is not the most economic siding and we cant replace it till spring because it is tooooooooooooooo cold to do it right now.

I have a friend with a small wood furnace that he used to use to heat his huge 2 story home but it was a little small for the job so he is going to sell it. He said he will sell it to me for 250 bucks which is a great price.

I know I have to build a shed to house it which is not a big deal but how do I plumb it into my current duct work?

Also is it supposed to be 10' from the house? I will probably build a small shed with cement blocks and leave one side open to put a door in, that way I could store some wood in there and if it burns it wont damage anything and the heat will not be toward the house
 

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Deo VIndice
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The duct work under your house...is it wrapped and insulated? If not, do that first. I had a situation where a part of the metal duct work had been left bare and I could never get enough warm air. Once it was wrapped in fiberglass and taped good, the air coming in was much warmer and the heater ran less.

I am guessing you would need to cut into the existing duct work and add the new duct from the wood furnace.

I am NOT sure if you would need to close the end of the original duct that goes backwards away from the house?
 

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Gunsmith
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been thinking of doing something similar myself let us know how it works out. Been thinking about doing this for a while. We heat with propane but still costs a lot.
 

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Tuco
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Outdoor wood Furnaces are the bomb. You can connect it to your air ducts and hotwater heater . Some furnaces can burn for over 27 hours with a load of wood. Some of them can heat over 5000 square feet. You don't have to split the logs . Just cut to length and place in the stove.
 

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Gunsmith
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Outdoor wood Furnaces are the bomb. You can connect it to your air ducts and hotwater heater . Some furnaces can burn for over 27 hours with a load of wood. Some of them can heat over 5000 square feet. You don't have to split the logs . Just cut to length and place in the stove.
Only problem being there mad expensive your looking 6k+ just for the unit that's not including any installation or installation materials. Even if you do it yourself its probably going to run you upwards of 7 grand.

Would love to have one but right now can't afford a proper one. Even thought about building one that worked with a forced air system but put that plan on hold for the moment.
 

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Gunsmith
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Wonder if it will cost 7 Grand when he is buying it for $250?
He is buying an indoor wood burning furnace and making it work outdoors. He has to build a shed insulate it run insulated ducting into his current ducting from outside etc.

It most likely will not take even 1/4 the load even the smallest outdoor wood burning stove would take, most likely he will have to fill it several times a day compared to a outdoor wood burning stove you fill every 12-16 hours. Outdoor wood burning stoves heat water that is then run into the home to heat it in several different ways, he is talking about heating via air which is much less efficient.

And again no it won't cost him 7 grand that's why im interested in seeing how it works because I was thinking of doing the same thing because I can't afford a purpose build outdoor wood burning stove at this time.
 

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I heat with a regular old Johnson woodstove,out in a shed,ducted to the house.It works.The key to efficient use is to have a return duct,so you blow hot air in,and get warm air in return.If you just put a supply duct,the temperature rise from ambient outside temp to house temp is too great,and it isn't going to heat that well.
The outdoor boiler type stoves work okay,you can heat multiple buildings,but they are very smokey,because the combustion chamber doesn't get hot enough to burn cleanly.When people say they "burn" twenty-odd hours,what they should say is the SMOULDER for twenty odd hours. A well set up woodstove will show no smoke,just heat waves out of the chimney.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
He is buying an indoor wood burning furnace and making it work outdoors. He has to build a shed insulate it run insulated ducting into his current ducting from outside etc.

It most likely will not take even 1/4 the load even the smallest outdoor wood burning stove would take, most likely he will have to fill it several times a day compared to a outdoor wood burning stove you fill every 12-16 hours. Outdoor wood burning stoves heat water that is then run into the home to heat it in several different ways, he is talking about heating via air which is much less efficient.

And again no it won't cost him 7 grand that's why im interested in seeing how it works because I was thinking of doing the same thing because I can't afford a purpose build outdoor wood burning stove at this time.


No you are wrong, it is in fact an outdoor wood stove, it is not a HUGE one but it is a 12 hour burn outdoor woodstove. The reason I am building a shed around it is to keep it insulated more and to store some wood in there so it does not get snow on the wood.

The reason it is 250 bucks is because he is my friend and he is hooking me up cheap. I do have to buy the duct work, I am thinking of running the duct work underground
 

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Make sure to use insulated duct.Plain steel duct will suck the heat out of the supply air before it hits the house.And insulated return. Build a replaceable filter assembly too,or you end up with fine dust thru out the house.
 

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you will love the out side woodburning furnace. We have had one now for 12 years. It is a 180,000 hardy wood furnace. It has a pump and a blower on the back of the furnace. The blower blows on the fire as needed. The pump pumps water through a gray pipe under ground to heat our house. It does use a lot of wood,about 7 cords a winter, where as the wood heater we use to have on the inside of the house only used four cords of wood. Our house is a little over 2,300 sq. feet and the furnace heats this house and is made to where we could run pipe to under house or shop and heat that if we wanted to.It holds a fire up to 27 hrs. on one load if the weather is not really cold. If the weather is cold, then it has to be filled up about every 12 hrs.
 
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