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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some of you followed our hog thread this spring and summer where we raised hogs for the first time. We bought 15 hogs at the sale yard in late May and raised them up to slaughter size.

I slaughtered our first hog about a month ago right at 260 pounds. I was rather surprised at how easy it was with a hog, in some ways I found it easier than a deer.

The first hog I got quite a bit of roast meat, pork chops, a fair bit of bacon about 25 pounds, and fair bit of ground pork. That girl produced us about 145 pounds of meat, including soup bones etc.

I was not real impressed with the fat content of that hog, so we kept the hogs in barn and fed them a mix of cracked corn and hog finisher for the last month.

This last sow was weighing in at around 325 to 350 pounds when I slaughtered her. She had a much better layer of fat and better marbling in the meat. I still have two other sows in the barn fattening up for the time being.



Me getting ready to start gutting our sow.



My friend Dave who bought a hog from us getting ready to start skinning his hog after I gutted it.



The first hog was a fair bit of work to process, the first half of the second was as well, by the second side of the last hog though I was getting it down to a science.

I found the roasts were less popular than the ground pork so I mad no roasts out of this last hog, she was all boneless chops, bacon, sausage and ground pork, soup bones and spare ribs. I got 165 pounds of meat of her.

I used a good portion of the neck to make cottage bacon out of on this one, and cut high on my bacon slabs to get as much bacon as I could. We were already out of bacon from the last hog, so I figured I would get as much as I could.

A lot of my bacon slabs were fairly thin so I folded them over before putting them in the freezer. This made a much better bacon cut than trying to make it from those thin slabs. I froze all slabs for about 24 hours and then sliced then on my meat cutter. You have to get them about right, not too frozen but just right to where it is easy to cut the bacon. I came out with four different styles of bacon with all this and managed to get 60 pounds of bacon from this girl.




I saw some bacon here a few years back made by my wifes uncle Donny who does professional meat processing and he had used ceran warp on the bacon and just folded it back and forth across each slice of bacon keeping them seperate from each other. This was very handy for separating the bacon when frozen, so I decided to use this same trick for my bacon.



I did not cure any of my bacon, I just made up a bottle of honey mixed with liquid smoke, salt, pepper, rubbed sage and a little celery seed and I put a little on the bacon when I cook it. It is in my and my wifes opinion, much better bacon than what we have ever bought at the store.

My boneless pork chops I did differently this time, I removed the back straps completely as one piece each and then butterfly cut my way through from one end to the other, making nice large chops about 1/2 inch thick. I just cut down through to 1/2 inch from the table and then moved back another 1/2 inch and cut all the way through for each of the chops.

The last time through I just threw the meat chunks into the grinder using the fat on the meat and in the meat to make sausage, but I did not wind up with enough fat to really call it sausage.

This time I separated all fat from all meat and kept it together.




I then weighed out the fat and the meat to get exact ratios of fat content, I have been doing 11 ounces of fat to 23 ounces of meat, this made a really, really good sausage. I would mix the spices in while grinding and then I went and ran it all back through a second time to more thoroughly mix it and to make a really fine sausage. We have a whole lot of good sausage this time around.

I spiced much of my ground pork, I used my seasoning and also added a tsp of beef bullion per pound of ground meat, it actually tastes a lot like beef burger now.

I could type pages more, but this is a bit much already.
 

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Awesome. I figure I'd go through the bacon as well.

What did you use for your sausage casing? or was it just patties? "spice mix" recipe for the bacon and sausage if you get a sec!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Awesome. I figure I'd go through the bacon as well.

What did you use for your sausage casing? or was it just patties? "spice mix" recipe for the bacon and sausage if you get a sec!
I just did patty sausage, I like how juicy the cased sausage is, but it harder for me to cook as fast. With all these kids cook time is an important consideration for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
These are some different recipes I looked up on the net. I also made some Italian seasoned sausage with some Italian spices that I bought in bulk some time back, I used that mixed with the red pepper for a spicy Italian sausage.


2 teaspoons dried sage
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 pinch ground cloves
2 pounds ground pork
---------------------------------------------------
Ground pork 1 pound
Sage 1/2 Teaspoon,
rubbed Salt 1 Teaspoon
Poultry seasoning 1/2 Teaspoon
Pepper 1/2 Teaspoon
Pinch ground allspice
--------------------------------------------------------
Ground pork 1 Pound
Seasoning salt/Smoked salt 1 1/2 Teaspoon
Black pepper 1 1/2 Teaspoon
Garlic powder 1/2 Teaspoon
Cloves powder 1 Pinch
Red pepper flakes 1 Pinch
Cayenne pepper 1 Pinch (Optional)
Sage 1 Teaspoon Fennel seed 1 Teaspoon (1/2-1)
Thyme 1 Teaspoon
Olive oil 2 Tablespoon, divided (1- patty mix (optional); 1- frying)

1/2 teaspoons rubbed sage
•½ teaspoon thyme
•1 teaspoon ground pepper
•11/2 teaspoon sea salt
•11/2 teaspoon parsley flakes
•¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
•¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
-------------------------------------------------------------
Boneless pork shoulder 2 Pound
Salt pork 4 Ounce
Water 2/3 Cup (10.67 tbs)
Finely chopped onion 1/3 Cup (5.33 tbs)
Finely snipped parsley 2 Tablespoon
Rubbed sage 4 Teaspoon
Salt 1 Teaspoon
Dried pepper flakes 1 Teaspoon (Green Colored)
Chili powder 1 Teaspoon
Dried thyme 1/2 Teaspoon, crushed
Dried marjoram 1/2 Teaspoon, crushed
Dried basil 1/2 Teaspoon, crushed
Garlic 2 Clove (10 gm), minced
---------------------------------------------------------------
Salt, 1.5 tbsp
Sage, ground, 1.5 tbsp
Thyme, ground, 1.5 tbsp
Nutmeg, ground, 1.5 tbsp
Brown Sugar, 4 tsp packed
Fennel seed, 2 tsp
Pepper, black, 1 tsp
crushed red pepper flakes,1 tsp
Rosemary, dried, 1 tsp
---------------------------------------------------------------
2 tbsp fennel seeds
1 tbsp dried oregano
1 tbsp dried basil
1 tbsp dried rosemary
2 tsp chili flakes
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp sea salt
----------------------------------------------------------------
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon fennel seeds, ground
1 tablespoon ground sage
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
(or 1 teaspoon black pepper)
2 teaspoons dried parsley (optional)
Use 2 tablespoons of spice blend per pound of meat to make sausage.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
10 pounds ground pork
4 tablespoons salt
3 tablespoons powdered sage shopping list
3 teaspoons powdered thyme
1 teaspoon ginger
1 ½ teaspoons nutmeg
1 teaspoon white pepper
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
2 pounds pork butt (2 1/2 pounds with bone), diced into 1/4-inch pieces
1/2 pound fat back, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh sage leaves
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4-lbs ground pork
•1-lb fine ground beef chuck
•2-tsp sugar
•1-tbsp marjoram
•1 1/2-tbsp salt
•1/2-tsp allspice
•1-tbsp black pepper
•1-tbsp caraway seeds
•8-cloves garlic, minced
•1-cup cold white wine
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
2 1/2 lbs boneless pork butt, Boston butt
2 1/2 teaspoons rubbed sage
2 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons marjoram
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon savory
1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon allspice
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
•5 lbs 80% lean boneless pork shoulder
•2 tablespoons kosher salt
•1 tablespoon fine ground black pepper
•1 1/2 tablespoons rubbed sage
•1 very finely chopped large onion
•1/2 cup real maple syrup
•1/2 cup ice water
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
•3 lbs 75% lean pork shoulder
•2 lbs lean beef
•2 tablespoons kosher style salt
•1 tablespoon fine ground black pepper
•1 tablespoon marjoram
•2 tablespoons granulated onion
•2 teaspoons ground celery seed
•1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
•1/2 teaspoon cardamon
•1/2 teaspoon mace
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
•1 lb boned pork shoulder
•1 teaspoon salt
•1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
•1/8 teaspoon sage
•1/8 teaspoon thyme
• 1 egg, beaten
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
•2 1/2 lbs boned pork shoulder
•2 1/2 lbs boneless beef chuck
•1 tablespoon Kosher salt
•1 tablespoon dried summer savory
•1 tablespoon dried marjoram
•1 tablespoon fine ground black pepper
•2 tablespoons paprika
•2 tablesoons granulated garlic (or three large fresh cloves)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
•5 lbs of boned pork butt (shoulder). Add pork fat if necessary to bring the meat to about 80/20 lean to fat.
•1 1/2 teaspoons of fine ground black pepper (fresh is best)
•2 tablespoons kosher style salt
•1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
•1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
•1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
•1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
•2 tablespoons sugar
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just kept grinding up a pound of sausage at a time with differing seasonings and then I would cook it up and have everyone test it and tell me what they thought. We went through a lot of sausage, ground pork and bacon through out the testing process over the last week, but we have a mix that we all seem to like pretty well on everything.

It will be a while before I can eat any more meat...... lol... I have eaten so much meat in the last week that I have no desire to touch meat for a while.
 

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These are some different recipes I looked up on the net. I also made some Italian seasoned sausage with some Italian spices that I bought in bulk some time back, I used that mixed with the red pepper for a spicy Italian sausage.


2 teaspoons dried sage
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 pinch ground cloves
2 pounds ground pork
---------------------------------------------------
Ground pork 1 pound
Sage 1/2 Teaspoon,
rubbed Salt 1 Teaspoon
Poultry seasoning 1/2 Teaspoon
Pepper 1/2 Teaspoon
Pinch ground allspice
--------------------------------------------------------
Ground pork 1 Pound
Seasoning salt/Smoked salt 1 1/2 Teaspoon
Black pepper 1 1/2 Teaspoon
Garlic powder 1/2 Teaspoon
Cloves powder 1 Pinch
Red pepper flakes 1 Pinch
Cayenne pepper 1 Pinch (Optional)
Sage 1 Teaspoon Fennel seed 1 Teaspoon (1/2-1)
Thyme 1 Teaspoon
Olive oil 2 Tablespoon, divided (1- patty mix (optional); 1- frying)

1/2 teaspoons rubbed sage
•½ teaspoon thyme
•1 teaspoon ground pepper
•11/2 teaspoon sea salt
•11/2 teaspoon parsley flakes
•¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
•¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
-------------------------------------------------------------
Boneless pork shoulder 2 Pound
Salt pork 4 Ounce
Water 2/3 Cup (10.67 tbs)
Finely chopped onion 1/3 Cup (5.33 tbs)
Finely snipped parsley 2 Tablespoon
Rubbed sage 4 Teaspoon
Salt 1 Teaspoon
Dried pepper flakes 1 Teaspoon (Green Colored)
Chili powder 1 Teaspoon
Dried thyme 1/2 Teaspoon, crushed
Dried marjoram 1/2 Teaspoon, crushed
Dried basil 1/2 Teaspoon, crushed
Garlic 2 Clove (10 gm), minced
---------------------------------------------------------------
Salt, 1.5 tbsp
Sage, ground, 1.5 tbsp
Thyme, ground, 1.5 tbsp
Nutmeg, ground, 1.5 tbsp
Brown Sugar, 4 tsp packed
Fennel seed, 2 tsp
Pepper, black, 1 tsp
crushed red pepper flakes,1 tsp
Rosemary, dried, 1 tsp
---------------------------------------------------------------
2 tbsp fennel seeds
1 tbsp dried oregano
1 tbsp dried basil
1 tbsp dried rosemary
2 tsp chili flakes
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp sea salt
----------------------------------------------------------------
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon fennel seeds, ground
1 tablespoon ground sage
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
(or 1 teaspoon black pepper)
2 teaspoons dried parsley (optional)
Use 2 tablespoons of spice blend per pound of meat to make sausage.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
10 pounds ground pork
4 tablespoons salt
3 tablespoons powdered sage shopping list
3 teaspoons powdered thyme
1 teaspoon ginger
1 ½ teaspoons nutmeg
1 teaspoon white pepper
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
2 pounds pork butt (2 1/2 pounds with bone), diced into 1/4-inch pieces
1/2 pound fat back, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh sage leaves
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4-lbs ground pork
•1-lb fine ground beef chuck
•2-tsp sugar
•1-tbsp marjoram
•1 1/2-tbsp salt
•1/2-tsp allspice
•1-tbsp black pepper
•1-tbsp caraway seeds
•8-cloves garlic, minced
•1-cup cold white wine
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
2 1/2 lbs boneless pork butt, Boston butt
2 1/2 teaspoons rubbed sage
2 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons marjoram
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon savory
1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon allspice
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
•5 lbs 80% lean boneless pork shoulder
•2 tablespoons kosher salt
•1 tablespoon fine ground black pepper
•1 1/2 tablespoons rubbed sage
•1 very finely chopped large onion
•1/2 cup real maple syrup
•1/2 cup ice water
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
•3 lbs 75% lean pork shoulder
•2 lbs lean beef
•2 tablespoons kosher style salt
•1 tablespoon fine ground black pepper
•1 tablespoon marjoram
•2 tablespoons granulated onion
•2 teaspoons ground celery seed
•1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
•1/2 teaspoon cardamon
•1/2 teaspoon mace
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
•1 lb boned pork shoulder
•1 teaspoon salt
•1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
•1/8 teaspoon sage
•1/8 teaspoon thyme
• 1 egg, beaten
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
•2 1/2 lbs boned pork shoulder
•2 1/2 lbs boneless beef chuck
•1 tablespoon Kosher salt
•1 tablespoon dried summer savory
•1 tablespoon dried marjoram
•1 tablespoon fine ground black pepper
•2 tablespoons paprika
•2 tablesoons granulated garlic (or three large fresh cloves)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
•5 lbs of boned pork butt (shoulder). Add pork fat if necessary to bring the meat to about 80/20 lean to fat.
•1 1/2 teaspoons of fine ground black pepper (fresh is best)
•2 tablespoons kosher style salt
•1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
•1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
•1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
•1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
•2 tablespoons sugar
This is extremelly awesome, but some names for the recipes would be great. (e.g. what is breakfast, Italian, Kielbasa, Polish, etc.?)
 

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I used to raise hogs for sale to slaughter houses, and the ideal weight for sale was 240, with a range of 225 - 250 yielding the best price. Not sure why, but that's how it worked here. When they were about 3 - 4 weeks away from weight I would switch from their regular feed to straight corn to put on the fat layers.

It sounds like your hogs dressed at a good weight. I think the standard rule was that a pig will normally dress out at 60% of hoof weight, though one time I had a litter that dressed at 74%. That's dressed weight, before the actual butchering, so I'm guessing yours was somewhere close to 60 - 65. Nice work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't have the exact recipe any more, somehow my notepad was closed with the recipe in it, I had not saved the recipe in there as yet. I used the below recipes to get an idea of where to start for amounts of seasons to add per pound of meat and then I did one pound test batches adding and subtracting as needed.

I would have to refigure amounts..

Celery seed
Basil
chopped chives
rubbed sage
black pepper
Cayenne pepper
paprika
all spice
oregano
brown sugar
sugar
garlic powder
season salt

1 small onion diced and ground with meat

I also added 1tsp beef bullion per pound of meat with some of this for my ground pork.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is extremelly awesome, but some names for the recipes would be great. (e.g. what is breakfast, Italian, Kielbasa, Polish, etc.?)

Honestly I did not keep track on any of the names of the sausages, I just looked up the recipes so that I could kind of average them out and get an idea of what to do with what spices I had on hand. I am pretty good in the kitchen, but everything I do more like mad science at first. This process has led to some very unique and very good food products though.

I figured so many of the different recipes called for such similar spices and amounts that if I averaged them out it was a pretty safe starting point.
 

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I'm curious as to why you didn't scald that hog. Was it that you weren't going to cure any of the meat?

I have seen people now days scald their hog then use a pressure washer to remove the hair and outer skin layers rather than scrape for an hour.

I'd skin that hog before I gutted it to help keep contamination out of the body cavity too. We always gut them after the outer skin work was done, either scalded or just skinned.

Just a few observations.
 

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Great post Mountain!! Thanks for the sausage recipes.... That bacon looks friggin' good!!
I grew up on a farm, and everybody used to do this.. People need to understand where
their food comes from, and how much better REAL food is. You did a fine job, good sir!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I used to raise hogs for sale to slaughter houses, and the ideal weight for sale was 240, with a range of 225 - 250 yielding the best price. Not sure why, but that's how it worked here. When they were about 3 - 4 weeks away from weight I would switch from their regular feed to straight corn to put on the fat layers.

It sounds like your hogs dressed at a good weight. I think the standard rule was that a pig will normally dress out at 60% of hoof weight, though one time I had a litter that dressed at 74%. That's dressed weight, before the actual butchering, so I'm guessing yours was somewhere close to 60 - 65. Nice work.

My feed was provided for free in trade for two of the hogs, I raised these 15 hogs on about 14,000 pounds of wheat and lentil mix. This made for some really good muscle mass but left them a bit lean. The first hog at 260 had a lot of meat but was a bit low on fat. I figured another month feeding the other three with the hog finisher and cracked corn would help with the fat and it has, though they still do not have a great deal of fat on them, but boy do they have a lot of muscle mass. I figure a few more weeks on the other sows will give me some time to get one of the other bigger freezers in the house and give them time to gain some more fat tissue, and give me a bit of a break on processing. It is also handy having the hogs for the household scraps, the chickens never eat most of it, but the hogs on the other hand eat them all.
 

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It's good that you are getting ahead on your pork supplies. Pork prices are expected to soar over thee next several months due to a virus that is systemic in the pork producing industry right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Has anyone ever tried making bacon from other animals?


I have four sheep to slaughter as well as the other two hogs, but I got to thinking the last sheep I did had a reasonable layer of fat over the rib muscles, if I folded that over itself I could actually get a bacon strip about an inch and a half wide or so out of that if I cut it into a bacon slab. The sheep fat tastes a bit different from hog fat but if I spiced it right might be good.

I might have to do some experimentation this time around on the four sheep and the one goat I have to slaughter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm curious as to why you didn't scald that hog. Was it that you weren't going to cure any of the meat?

I have seen people now days scald their hog then use a pressure washer to remove the hair and outer skin layers rather than scrape for an hour.

I'd skin that hog before I gutted it to help keep contamination out of the body cavity too. We always gut them after the outer skin work was done, either scalded or just skinned.

Just a few observations.

I did not have anything big enough to effectively scald them with, something I intend to solve this year, because I would like to try that. On my first hog I had heard a lot of people use a propane torch to dehair their hogs, some people on here and several people in town do this. I tried it, but I did not care much for the lingering smell of burnt hair, so I wound up removing all the skin anyway. I figured this time it was just as easy to simply skin the hog as everyone else did with theirs. I was just a lot more careful than them on not destroying all the fat layer. It does take some time to get the skin off without losing fat tissue, and on the crease along the back bone no matter what I lost some fat tissue but not much. I originally wanted to leave the skin on so that I might be able to do some old fashioned smoked hams. I have a friend Hank down in Lewiston that smokes hams for people outside his tranny shop, I believe he charges about $35 or $40 a ham and I thought I might try having him do a ham for us.

I think I will continue skinning for the next two hogs, but this summer when I do more hogs I want to try scalding and doing skin on.
 
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