Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Road Trip!!!
Joined
·
850 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this question has been brought up a lot on here. But is it safe or not? I used my camp chef oven indoors for an hour with my carbon monoxcide detector right next to it. It detected nothing.

I don't recommend anyone else do this!

I figure I will get the "You're Gunna Die" responses(and you might be right), but I am honestly curious under what circimstances these appliances will create an issue.

My interest is in using during power outage or emergency. I would never operate while sleeping. I would use the small 1b tanks. Does it happen when something is wrong with the apppliance?

So, please someone educate me. Is it an issue with low oxygen? How is it any different that using a propane oven indoors?

Thanks
BIH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I'm curious as well. I've been in houses that have no venting of any sort for the gas stove. Seen a whole lot of RVs that run propane ovens and cooktops without venting turned on. Seems to me running one with venting system would be okay. Anyone with facts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
I use a coleman stove at my bol to cook everything I eat there ,I have a gas heater mounted on the wall to heat the place and before that i have used lp heaters the kind that bolt to the top of a grill tank and i have never had a problem but maybe if there is something wrong with the unit or the room is small and airtight it could create a problem there i normally have my wall mounted heater running 24-7 when im there in the winter i think it depends a lot on the situation but it probally isnt the smartest practice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
I am pretty sure that the concern is both: low oxygen and breathing the gas or fumes. Appliances in RVs ARE vented in that the propane is always external to the living space just in case.

A detector should cover the latter. Just crack a door or window for low oxygen concerns. Of course fire is always a concern and some people take no precautions for that. I always have a couple fire extinguishers on hand. I also turn the propane knob to off when not in use and place the propane outside.

The "Mr. Heater" Buddy is supposedly safe indoors. And I have done cooking indoors with propane during power outages.

It would be nice to hear from an authority though.
 

·
Wild Edibles Expert
Joined
·
10,167 Posts
I use my LP camp stove inside all the time. I use it as my kitchen stove as I prefer gas cooking over electric (the lower cost of LP is a plus. A small tank for cooking lasts me about three months, which is about 20 cents a day.)

As far as I can tell I ain't dead yet. However, I am giving my brain to science and preserving it in alcohol now.
 

·
Reluctor of dominatus
Joined
·
277 Posts
I know this question has been brought up a lot on here. But is it safe or not. I used my camp chef oven indoors for an hour with my carbon monoxcide detector right next to it. It detected nothing.

I don't recommend anyone else do this!

I figure I will get the "You're Gunna Die" responses(and you might be right), but I am honestly curious under what circimstances these appliances will create an issue.

My interest is in using during power outage or emergency. I would never operate while sleeping. I would use the small 1b tanks. Does it happen when something is wrong with the apppliance?

So, please someone educate me. Is it an issue with low oxygen? How is it any different that using a propane oven indoors?

Thanks
BIH
I have a Mr. Heater Big Buddy propane heater with a built-in oxygen sensor that I have used indoors on occassion, however I leave next to the patio door which is opened a bit and have a CO detector right next to it, it always stayed on zero and I still get good heat from it even with the door opened a bit.

I'd make sure there was some ventilation even if the unit has an oxygen sensor I would'nt want to bet my life on ether the heater or the CO detector functioning perfectly 100% of the time.
 

·
•--• • •- -•-• •
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
I brought this up in a similar thread recently. People were saying they'd use them for a SHTF scenario...in their garage of course......or outside of course.....the of course included in their statements. I asked why they felt they had to be used outside of the kitchen and added that millions of homes have PROPANE STOVES! LPG is LPG - whether it's in a one pound container or a 500 gallon pig. The only people answering were those that agreed our propane camp stoves could be used indoors. I think it's just a misconception? And Straight Razor ain't dead so that's good enough for me! :thumb:
 

·
Free Mason
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
My two cents. Propane when burned in normal air emits carbon dioxide. The same as when we breath. No problem unless you are burning a lot of propane and the room is very tight with no fresh air entering. Colman gasoline stoves and lanterns give off carbon monoxide. This is a poisonous gas. They should not be used inside. That being said, I use Colman gasoline stoves and lanterns inside. I make sure I have a window open to provide fresh air.
 

·
At Sugent
Joined
·
1,138 Posts
You can heat with unvented propane heaters in a pinch. I did it for one whole winter.
I had multiple carbon monoxide sensors and they never sounded an alarm. I didn't die or anything but MAN do they put alot of water vapor and soot in the air. I literally had to repaint my entire cabin because the soot covered everything and is very hard to wash off. And the water vapor can cause a serious problem with condensation inside your room in the very cold months. If you think about it, you can burn 20lbs of propane pretty quickly in one of those heaters, that's a lot of soot and water. I burned several hundred pounds over the course of the winter, and I live in California.
They have nice vented propane heaters that require no electricity and use outside air for combustion. They work great and are very easy to install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,613 Posts
I have used Kerosene heaters in doors for over a couple of decades and I am still alive. This is actually the most common form of heating a home in Japan and there are very few deaths during the year. I spend a lot of time in my RV which is heated by propane, propane hot water heater and propane stove and oven and I am still alive. Yes most propane accessories in a RV are vented out side but the stove aint. Use a detector and crack a window and you will be just fine 99.99% of the time.
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
67,493 Posts
Propane burns clean and doesn't produce much CO as long as it has adequate oxygen. Burning them indoors is no big deal. Same with kerosene. Just make sure you have some ventilation to let in air. And of course, using a CO detector is always a good idea.
 

·
happiness is a warm gun
Joined
·
790 Posts
I have used Mr. Heater brand propane heaters (2 different sizes) for several days inside during power outages and have had zero problems. Even though they have low oxygen sensors to shut it down automatically when theres a problem, I have always left windows and doors open slightly to keep the air moving a bit as an extra safety. They also have "tip over" sensors. Good little heaters.
 

·
The Over 40 Club
Joined
·
1,412 Posts
When I first got my cabin I used my Coleman cook stove all the time for cooking and heating water.

I used kerosine for heat just a small heater. Now that I have had my house built I still use propane for cooking and heating water. And wood for heat.
 

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,893 Posts
I'd looked long and hard recently at the Mr. Heater propane devices. They are rated for use indoors so long as you use the small canisters of propane; HOWEVER, they are not rated for such if you hook them up to a 20# propane tank, of which I have several.

While they don't say why, I presume this is that the 20# cylinder connections may be prone to leakage at some point.

People have had indoor gas stoves and the like for years, so the idea of burning LP indoors isn't new. If the house is very tight--mine is--there might potentially be issues with it. But that's when you don't run them if you're sleeping.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bigislandhikers

·
Free Mason
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
I'd looked long and hard recently at the Mr. Heater propane devices. They are rated for use indoors so long as you use the small canisters of propane; HOWEVER, they are not rated for such if you hook them up to a 20# propane tank, of which I have several.

While they don't say why, I presume this is that the 20# cylinder connections may be prone to leakage at some point.

People have had indoor gas stoves and the like for years, so the idea of burning LP indoors isn't new. If the house is very tight--mine is--there might potentially be issues with it. But that's when you don't run them if you're sleeping.
I have a Mr. Heater that I connect to 20 pound tanks. I run the hose out a window and have the tank outside. I do not think the tanks are rated to use in living space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,742 Posts
I really wish manufacturers would not put a slew of warnings on the stuff just for CYA.

I also don't understand why my unvented gas stove (with an optional vented fan in the bottom of the microwave over it) is OK, but my small one burner camping propane stove is not.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top