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Have had for many years and love my Cold Steel Carbon5 Trailmaster bought as a second. Looked at with a magnifying glass many a time and can't find an excuse to call it a second quality, except for the 2 melted into the end of the grip. Has a tough leather sheath and a black ballistic nylon sheath included. Will use it anywhere for anything and holds an edge forever.
 

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Totally Agree on Cold Steel knives generally and C-5 in particular. Bought several back in the day and glad I did.. It would not be saying too much to say I have trusted my life and/or limb to a TM....
 

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Over and Out
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Sorry if this is an 'echo'.. (don't have the time to read thru the previous 100 pages, holy mackerel.. :D: So far, been Extremely pleased with the TOPS Mission 21.. Incredibly solid, takes a beating, keeps an edge, and sharpens-up quickly.. :cool:

.02
jd
 

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Back when I was somewhere around 13 I'm guessing and up until around 18 I had an old knife I found in my grandparents stuff when the last of them died. I don't know the maker, it was in the "green River style" with a 10" blade. I have seen similar blades, old hickory makes a like size one. It was the most useful knife I ever had. It was right at the size where it made a good bush knife/small machete, was thin and had enough flex to work as a fillet knife, yet held up to a lot of hard use cutting a small variety of bamboo (I cut it on a near daily basis for years, as it was invasive to our property) and pine tree branches. Eventually I knocked a thumb sized piece out of the blade while cutting down some pine. The knife was put away and forgotten.

Some time in my mid to late 30's I found it again, and ended up turning it into two knives. One an Otzi style, and one a basic knife...the otzi one I like but I need to make a sheath. But I really miss the old original one. I have tried a lot of other knives over the years and none have matched the overall ability of that old knife. It built shelters, cleaned fish, cut bait, worked clearing brush, and would sharpen easier than any knife I have had even to this day...that old blade seemed to have some magic in it.
 

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Patiently Waiting
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I got curious and picked up a Cold Steel Finn Hawk the other day. Nice budget blade with top reviews.

Suits the climate I live in (stainless steel) and for AUD$120 I can have one for the GHB, workshop and hiking pack.

Many of the knives available in the US are either not available here, or prohibitively expensive. For some reason quite a few local stores stock a number of Cold Steel knives and machetes.
 

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swamp rat
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I went ahead and purchased the First Edge, model 5150. I was considering the 5050 but preferedn the blade design on the 5150 just slightly. Same price, NIB for $100. I've had it out in the woods a few times and put the blade to the test. I know the name of the steel is hokey, "Elmax", but I was naturally attracted to it since I am...."Elmojo".
This steel is exceptional. I have tried to dull the edge and have only managed to create a need for a couple of quick strokes to bring it back to factory sharp. The point is unphased, like a needle. No sign of any rust and I Ieft this blade wet in the sheath for days. The fit of the sheath is not quite right. Its a kydex mold, bolted to nylon webbing. But it has thin metal plates between the kydex layers and it creates just enough play to let the knife rattle slightly. I am going to try removing the metal, or adding a washer to the edge side top bolt to tighten the fit or add a second haft retention strap to eliminate the rattle. Its weight has something to do with the rattle. It is almost a pound and a half. That's a hefty 6" blade. I like the weight. It makes the job of chopping easier.
Speaking of if chopping... this knife has a balance point dead center of the choil, almost dead center of the knife. yhat may be good for knife fighting, BUT I always bring a gun to a knife fight so I wouldn't know. I do know that weight forward makes life easier most of the time. I also prefer linen to G-10 scales, but the G-10 isn't too bad. I can change them to linen micarta if I keep the knife. The fit of the scales to the blade is excellent. What you should expect on a high priced blade.
All in all its a pretty good knife. I think now that I should have stuck with the 5050 for its more practical design as a bush knife. This 5150 is a bit more of a military design and has more of a fighting knife aspect. I give it an 9. Slightly better than an Esee 6 (8.5). Its a great knife for the $100 yhst I paid for it
I added a ferrocerium rod to the sheath and have 50 yards of 40# braided fishing line, 2 hooks, about 20 feet of #22 coated wire and a few feet of 550 cord wrapped around the sheath and held in place using ranger bands. Might build a leather sheath for it. Will have a pouch on the sheath if I do.
I'll post some pics of the rig later tonight.
 

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Have had for many years and love my Cold Steel Carbon5 Trailmaster bought as a second. Looked at with a magnifying glass many a time and can't find an excuse to call it a second quality, except for the 2 melted into the end of the grip. Has a tough leather sheath and a black ballistic nylon sheath included. Will use it anywhere for anything and holds an edge forever.
A good knife but the handle is quite narrow, which makes it move around in the hand. This really encourages "snapping it" to use the blade weight by "spinning" the wrist, not "locking" it, but it robs chopping power vs a BK-9. The Trailmaster does feel better than a BK-9 because its extra blade thickness means it doesn't vibrate, and the tang is not touching the hand either, being fully surrounded by rubber. More work but less tiring.
Gaston
 

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Can you explain the reason for wanting these massive blades as your only survival knife or tool. Beyond chopping and blazing trail what advantages do they have for all the other tasks you will need to perform with your knife to survive in the wilderness? Ever try to skin squirrel with a machete? In a survival scenario you will be catching trapping smaller animals squirrel rabbits not buffalo or deer. Even than ever try skinning a deer with a machete or blade 7 inches or larger? What about all the other finer whittling tasks to make traps snares shelter, twine out of hide or leather.
Honestly I think if you are of the bigger is better school you should go camping with only one blade your machete or 7 inch plus blade. Take your normal gear but only one knife one sharp edged tool. Even a normal family camp out. Chopping veggies slicing meat whittle marshmallow sticks making tent pegs you will quickly see how cumbersome that huge blade is. Than step it up make some snares, fish traps start a fire with your flint and machete. Than try skinning a squirrel or even cleaning one with that machete


People in Nepal, India and others that practice the skills with those blades do everything that they have to to live every day with the one blade. No problem. The kukri is first and foremost a utility knife for daily living. Do a bit of research and you will find this out,!
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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COLD STEEL has been producing surprises for a long time.
I bought a Bushman back when the straight blade was all they offered. I bought another when the wife stole one for the kitchen.

Then they came out with the bowie blade.
For the money they are pretty impossible to beat and will be a survivor like the cockroach when the world ends. Take an edge scary sharp. I now have 5 or 6 of them in vehicles in bags etc. AND the great thing is if you lose one how much are you out?

https://www.knifecenter.com/kc_new/store_store.html?usrsearch=bushman

THEN...
They came out with THE BLACK BEAR BOWIE

CS hit this one out of the park.
A little stone work and it cuts like a razor. Great balance and fit. A serviceable sheath and again so cheap if you destroy it who cares.
I was so impressed I bought another one and will be taking it to Alaska in 2 months .
https://www.knifecenter.com/item/CS...eel-blade-polypropylene-handles-cor-ex-sheath

I have some expensive knives, but why risk losing them when these work as well as anything I own.
 

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Well and good NW guy- Ive used the sister blade to yours, the smachet, a good useful yard tool. My concern with depending on one for one's life is simply that they are so thin, I don't trust it not to snap in a survival situation. A formidable looking blade, true enuf- but the original smatchets and their Welsh short sword forebearers were much thicker and heavier... Personally there are other Cold Steel weapon/tools Id use first if my butt was on the line..but then I own 4 TrailMasters, ;) just sayin.. Good luck on your trip! Enjoy and best wishes, Dun
 

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People in Nepal, India and others that practice the skills with those blades do everything that they have to to live every day with the one blade. No problem. The kukri is first and foremost a utility knife for daily living. Do a bit of research and you will find this out,!
The a Kukri is one of the oldest blade designs in the world. Many historians believe that the Kukri’s blade shape is descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, about 2500 years ago. One theory is the Machira, the calavry sword of the ancient Macedonians that Alexander the Great’s troops carried when they invaded northwest India in the 4th Century BC was copied by the local Nepalese/Indian black smiths. While the specifics of the Kukri’s origins are shrouded in ancient history, there is no doubt it is one of the very first combat knives/swords. Just as there is no doubt that Kukris were first and foremost one of the fiercest sword/knife weapons of all time. One unique detail of the kukri’s design attest to the kukri primary purpose, is the notch just before the start of the blade. What it does is interrupt the blood flow to the handle and to let it drip to the soil so one can maintain a solid grip during battle. In a Gurkha’s hands a kukri is devastating razor sharp weapon reputed to be capable of splitting a man in half. A kukri is an extension of a Gurkha, it is a part of him and his identity. Nepal, the Gurkha's and the Kukri will forever be inseparable, incomplete without each other. While a kukri is a Gurkha most prized possession, revered for it’s deadly effectiveness. You are correct in that kukri is also an all- purpose knife to the hill people of Nepal. A prized versatile working tool and indispensable possession of almost every Gurungs, Magars, Rai and limbu ethnic groups of central and eastern Nepal. What you failed to mention or may be unaware of, is the traditional Nepalese Kukri feature two little knives attached at the back of the sheath. The small sharp knife is a Karda, it serves as a small skinning, cutting knife. The other knife is called a Chakmak. It is blunt on both sides and it works like a knife sharpener punch and fire starter. Its stroked against a lime stone to create sparks in the same way steel is used with flint or ferro rods.
Which makes sense given a moments thought. . In my experience one knife for everything would be impracticable. While I have camped hiked hunted and fished everywhere from Alaska to the Amazon over the past fifty odd years I am by no means an wilderness guide or off grid expert. I have to go with what I know and my skill set. Just because a knife can do a job, does not mean it is the best knife for the job. Truth is I never rely on just one knife, typically I EDC four or five knives. In the bush the number and variety of knives increase dramatically to include a machete, saw and ax. Skinning and other small knives for detailed work and skinning game, medium size blades like the BK2, I've carried on my hip 24/7 for the past fifteen odd years when I am off grid or doing chores around the homestead handles most of my daily routine chores. While the machete and larger knives handle clearing brush/ chopping tasks, the saw or ax handle most of my wood processing.
But this thread is about one survival knife. Not one knife set like my BK7, BK9 knife sets or the MercWorx David & Goliath knife set I wish I owned. Nor is it about a Kukri knife set.
To me a survival knife is exactly what the title says. A knife that I can use for all things I need to do to survive. It must be indestructible, able to take a razor edge and hold that edge. Easy to sharpen with whatever is available. Big enough for splitting wood, building a shelter use as a weapon if need be but not so big that it is cumbersome or unable to do the finer tasks. To me the BK2 full tang flat ground drop point 1095 high carbon blade made of a full quarter inch thick, 5.25” inches long X 1.75 inches wide fits that definition perfectly. It’s the knife I would have on me if everything went south while I was out in the bush. In the past 15 years I have done everything I need a knife for with the BK2 Everything from making rawhide thread from squirrel hide to digging a Dakota fire hole in rocky soil. It is literally indestructible, easy to maintain and does most everything I need a knife to do. It does not clear brush or chop down trees as well as a big knife, machete or ax. But than those are not things I need to do to survive. In good conscience I can not make suggestions based on what I have read and heard, I can only suggest what I have actually used and has worked for me. Including on more than a few multi week survival excursions, to test my skills and equipment. In my limited experience a big knife is awkward to carry and cumbersome to work with for a lot of tasks. Ultimately it is an individual choice, after all it’s your life on the line. If in your experienced, well researched expert opinion a large knife is what you are best able to sustain life off grid in the bush, than that is what you should use. Personally it is not what I would recommend to anyone I wanted to see make it out of the bush in good health and spirits.
 

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LongRider... agreed on the khukri... I used the old Dehradun used in ww2 and marketed by Windlass since then- great and useful camping tool and I became somewhat handy with one several decades ago- not as "cheap" as price would indicate and tougher than one would think. If it was all I had I could make do for both a tool and a fearsome weapon... just keep something around to maintain the edge, I carry a small stone, some carry small diamond honing stick..
 

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Hi. Long Rider.
Nice history lesson for those not in the know.
I’ve been using kukris for over 30 years now and collect/use then on a daily basis. Even saying this, the people in Nepal who depend on these tools for their lives can do way more than I could imagine but there are a number of YouTube videos of their skills with the blades and the uses that they excel at available to watch.
As your probably aware, most daily agricultural tools were put into use as weapons if required. In the U.K. there are many tools that were used such as bill Hooks, axes etc that the rich lords may have war hammers and designed axes for the purpose of war, but the surf would use what he used on a daily basis. This is why they were so dangerous in their hands as they were familiar with what the tool/weapon now could do.
Same with those that are and have been selected for the Gurkha regiments past and present. Yes some(not all) have a blade sharpener, small knife and tinder attached to the sheath of the blade but this also depends on the style of blade, it’s use, the Khami that made it and the village/area it comes from for all these factors play a part.
But one thing is common. Each area has its basic design of tool that is used as a daily use, edc if you like basic utility tool that if called upon (just like an axe or bill Hook etc) can also be used for defending ones life from predators.
As for the so called “blood notch”. This has been discussed by so called experts for many years. If you wish to know the real reason for it, ask a Gurkha! If you’re lucky he may even tell you! ��
 

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The a Kukri is one of the oldest blade designs in the world. Many historians believe that the Kukri’s blade shape is descended from the classic Greek sword of Kopis, about 2500 years ago. One theory is the Machira, the calavry sword of the ancient Macedonians that Alexander the Great’s troops carried when they invaded northwest India in the 4th Century BC was copied by the local Nepalese/Indian black smiths. While the specifics of the Kukri’s origins are shrouded in ancient history, there is no doubt it is one of the very first combat knives/swords. Just as there is no doubt that Kukris were first and foremost one of the fiercest sword/knife weapons of all time. One unique detail of the kukri’s design attest to the kukri primary purpose, is the notch just before the start of the blade. What it does is interrupt the blood flow to the handle and to let it drip to the soil so one can maintain a solid grip during battle. In a Gurkha’s hands a kukri is devastating razor sharp weapon reputed to be capable of splitting a man in half. A kukri is an extension of a Gurkha, it is a part of him and his identity. Nepal, the Gurkha's and the Kukri will forever be inseparable, incomplete without each other. While a kukri is a Gurkha most prized possession, revered for it’s deadly effectiveness. You are correct in that kukri is also an all- purpose knife to the hill people of Nepal. A prized versatile working tool and indispensable possession of almost every Gurungs, Magars, Rai and limbu ethnic groups of central and eastern Nepal. What you failed to mention or may be unaware of, is the traditional Nepalese Kukri feature two little knives attached at the back of the sheath. The small sharp knife is a Karda, it serves as a small skinning, cutting knife. The other knife is called a Chakmak. It is blunt on both sides and it works like a knife sharpener punch and fire starter. Its stroked against a lime stone to create sparks in the same way steel is used with flint or ferro rods.
Which makes sense given a moments thought. . In my experience one knife for everything would be impracticable. While I have camped hiked hunted and fished everywhere from Alaska to the Amazon over the past fifty odd years I am by no means an wilderness guide or off grid expert. I have to go with what I know and my skill set. Just because a knife can do a job, does not mean it is the best knife for the job. Truth is I never rely on just one knife, typically I EDC four or five knives. In the bush the number and variety of knives increase dramatically to include a machete, saw and ax. Skinning and other small knives for detailed work and skinning game, medium size blades like the BK2, I've carried on my hip 24/7 for the past fifteen odd years when I am off grid or doing chores around the homestead handles most of my daily routine chores. While the machete and larger knives handle clearing brush/ chopping tasks, the saw or ax handle most of my wood processing.
But this thread is about one survival knife. Not one knife set like my BK7, BK9 knife sets or the MercWorx David & Goliath knife set I wish I owned. Nor is it about a Kukri knife set.
To me a survival knife is exactly what the title says. A knife that I can use for all things I need to do to survive. It must be indestructible, able to take a razor edge and hold that edge. Easy to sharpen with whatever is available. Big enough for splitting wood, building a shelter use as a weapon if need be but not so big that it is cumbersome or unable to do the finer tasks. To me the BK2 full tang flat ground drop point 1095 high carbon blade made of a full quarter inch thick, 5.25” inches long X 1.75 inches wide fits that definition perfectly. It’s the knife I would have on me if everything went south while I was out in the bush. In the past 15 years I have done everything I need a knife for with the BK2 Everything from making rawhide thread from squirrel hide to digging a Dakota fire hole in rocky soil. It is literally indestructible, easy to maintain and does most everything I need a knife to do. It does not clear brush or chop down trees as well as a big knife, machete or ax. But than those are not things I need to do to survive. In good conscience I can not make suggestions based on what I have read and heard, I can only suggest what I have actually used and has worked for me. Including on more than a few multi week survival excursions, to test my skills and equipment. In my limited experience a big knife is awkward to carry and cumbersome to work with for a lot of tasks. Ultimately it is an individual choice, after all it’s your life on the line. If in your experienced, well researched expert opinion a large knife is what you are best able to sustain life off grid in the bush, than that is what you should use. Personally it is not what I would recommend to anyone I wanted to see make it out of the bush in good health and spirits.
I agree with the highlighted sentence, but I have to criticize the choice of a BK-2.

The BK-2 is a full pound in weight for a blade length of 5.25". That is extraordinarily heavy for a knife of this size... All that weight is in the handle, which, as you -fairly- mention, makes it a poor chopper.

Many large 10" blade knives are the same weight, such as the Cold Steel Trailmaster, and can do far more. For the same weight the Cold Steel offers more.

While the BK-2 is not a bad knife per see, I have a lot of objection to it as something for novices combined with unexpected "Survival use"... The ultra-heavy BK-2 handle is hanging entirely outside the sheath, meaning the provided sheath is often not up to the task of keeping the knife inside, or simply upright during motion: It badly needs a custom sheath.

BK as a company does not care if the edge is centered to the spine: Many BK-9s I have seen were warped and/or had uncentered edges (although edge thickness was consistent and fairly thin: These were good points... The lack of centering and warping is more of a cosmetic issue that I find shocking on principle, but less likely on a knife as short as a BK-2)

Carrying a whole bunch of stuff, machete, saw and ax is really a bit much for "survival use", instead of simply a "just in case" Survival Knife, which is more like a fire-extinguisher type of use. It does not do much good to suggest many vehicle-carried items to those who range out there on foot...

The idea of carrying even a hatchet without a vehicle I find particularly egregious... Just water pouches are already very taxing...

Stainless steels are also better adapted to harsh conditions with little maintenance. Generally I have found 420J to be superior (longer edge holding with easier sharpening combined), but I realized recently this superiority may not be due to the steel itself: It could be due to the low price of a knife(!)....

I discovered recently low cost knives (in 420J and Asian made often) often do very well in edge holding because the steel grain is perpendicular to the edge (resulting in the edge never really wanting to roll)... This has a downside when batoning: In twisty wood the knife will bend, and stay bent: This is because the carbide stream grain is often vertical to the blade on cheap knives: The blade does not crack, but does not spring back straight either.

More expensive knives will usually have a steel's "rolled sheet grain" parallel to the blade, and so they will spring straight from 20 degrees of bending, but their edges will also have the grain parallel to the edge, leading to easier apex rolls.

So try out cheap 420 knives: they are not necessarily that bad. I would actually rate some of them higher based on the testing I did (I chop but don't baton), and it could be just because of that grain orientation issue...

Gaston
 

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I agree with the highlighted sentence, but I have to criticize the choice of a BK-2.

The BK-2 is a full pound in weight for a blade length of 5.25". That is extraordinarily heavy for a knife of this size... All that weight is in the handle, which, as you -fairly- mention, makes it a poor chopper.

Many large 10" blade knives are the same weight, such as the Cold Steel Trailmaster, and can do far more. For the same weight the Cold Steel offers more.

While the BK-2 is not a bad knife per see, I have a lot of objection to it as something for novices combined with unexpected "Survival use"... The ultra-heavy BK-2 handle is hanging entirely outside the sheath, meaning the provided sheath is often not up to the task of keeping the knife inside, or simply upright during motion: It badly needs a custom sheath.

BK as a company does not care if the edge is centered to the spine: Many BK-9s I have seen were warped and/or had uncentered edges (although edge thickness was consistent and fairly thin: These were good points... The lack of centering and warping is more of a cosmetic issue that I find shocking on principle, but less likely on a knife as short as a BK-2)

Carrying a whole bunch of stuff, machete, saw and ax is really a bit much for "survival use", instead of simply a "just in case" Survival Knife, which is more like a fire-extinguisher type of use. It does not do much good to suggest many vehicle-carried items to those who range out there on foot...

The idea of carrying even a hatchet without a vehicle I find particularly egregious... Just water pouches are already very taxing...

Gaston
Where do you get your information? Ka Bar has been making knives since 1898. In 1923 it changed its name from Union Cutlery Co to KA Bar based on a water stained letter from a trapper that said he had used his Union Cutlery knife to kill a bear. Ka Bar began producing knives for the US Marines in 1942. There are literally tens of millions of soldiers that would dispute your claim that Ka Bar produces sub standard warped off center knives and does not care about quality. Including the UDT or Naked Warriors that were the predecessors of the SEALs. All they took on their missions besides for their swimming trunks were their KA Bars. Ka Bar is who manufactures Becker knives. I doubt that any credible person on this forum or any other forum would second you preposterous accusations about the BK2 or claims about KA Bars substandard quality. If your claims had even the remotest foundation in fact the BK2 would not be consistently rated as among the best survival knife’s ever made. That a quick google search reveals.

Best Hunting Knife Reviews for Hunting Enthusiasts – 2018 Edition

5 Best Survival Knife in the World: Buying Guide & Reviews 2017

Best Hunting Knife | Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

The #1 Best Survival Knife: KA-bar Becker BK2

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Review – This Knife is All You Need

In 30 plus years I have never heard any complaint like yours. Warped blades off center grinds, not even close to any of the BK2’s or any of the BK7’s, BK9’s Becker Neckers that I or anyone else has. Except for one moron, that had a BK11CSM, he claimed was warped and had an off center grind. Turned out the idiot completely rounded off one side trying to do a convex edge and the other side had more bevels than a Fugazi. For a little effort re-profileing it I had a $85.00 hair splitting San Mai blade for free, from an idiot that didn’t have the integrity to acknowledge his own incompetence. Who’d rather be a know it all, than learn how to correctly sharpen a knife. If your complaints are real, not fantasy or the result of abuse and incompetent attempts to sharpen them. Go to blade forums to the Becker Knife & Tool section and post pics of them. Ethan Becker will personally see that Ka Bar gets you taken care of. I have seen him go into his personal collection to replace an out of production Becker that had failed. Becker knives have a well respected reputation for being solid knives that work for a living at a working mans price point. Ethan Becker takes a great deal of personal pride in making sure that standard is upheld. I am so confident in Ethan Beckers integrity and Ka Bars manufacturing ethics. That if you actually have any defective Becker knives that are not damaged through abuse or incompetent efforts to sharpen them and do not get taken care of after posting pics of them them here and in Beckers forum at Bladeforums.com. I’ll buy them, for what you paid for them.
Folks spend two three times the price of what they pay for a BK2 for a knife of equal quality. An ESSE 5 is a perfect example, nearly identical to a BK2, 1095 high carbon steel, same length, width, thickness same design & shape. An excellent high quality knife. As I said nearly identical knives except an ESSE 5, costs 2 to 3 times more than a BK2
Of course the BK2 is a heavy knife, thats what you get with a heavy duty indestructible quarter inch thick knife. The weight has never hindered me. The weight improves the knife’s chopping performance. Makes it feel and function like a razor sharp hatchet. The design is such that the weight has never hindered me in doing any of the finer bush crafting tasks I need to do to survive in the bush, but than I do not have limp wrists. Nor is the weight all in the handle as you claim. The center balance point is between the first and second screw on the handle. That places the weight slightly forward a perfect balance for cutting and chopping. You are right the sheath is not the best top of the line sheath made. The 2nd gen Campanion the BK22 has a better sheath. Of course custom sheath would be a great option. Thats true of most any production knife’ sheath. That said the provided sheath locks securely in place and the strap keeps the handle flush against the sheath. If your BK2 flops around use the snap yo lock the handle strap shut. Not doing that is called operator error not a design flaw. Amazon has dozens of sheaths that will fit a BK2 or get a custom HedgeHog survival sheath. You’ll pay three times the price of the BK2 for a custom HedgeHog sheath. No one makes a custom $200 knife sheath for a poorly manufactured off center ground warped knife. You will need to snap or lock the handle straps closed on the $200 sheath same as the stock sheath.
Do not put words in my mouth I did not say the BK2 was not a good chopper I said (quote)“It does not clear brush or chop down trees as well as a big knife, machete or ax.” (end quote) As it is apparent that you failed to understand the points let me explain it so you can understand. An ax chops trees down and splits wood better than a knife, any knife, including the BK2. A machete clears brush, better than any knife, including the BK2. A large knife can chop down trees and clears brush better than smaller knives including the BK2. No part of that means a BK does not chop well. It simply means chopping down trees and clearing brush are not its strong suits, nor is filleting fish. But who cares that is not what I need from a knife to survive if all my gear is lost, destroyed or otherwise unavailable. I do know the BK2 is an indestructible knife, that will do ALL the tasks necessary to survive in the most adverse conditions, because I’ve done it. Doing chores I produced a stack of branches 5' high X 8' deep X 12' long from limbing some small trees on the homestead, with my BK2. It did the job better than a 10 inch Kershaw D2 steel OutCast and with less hassle than a chainsaw. It was like using a razor sharp hatchet. I’ve skinned rabbits & squirrels made string out of their hides, butchered/ skinned large game, batoned through battery cable. Built shelters in the bush, dug Dakota fire holes, made tent pegs, shaved wood curls, made feather sticks, processed all the firewood I needed for planned 1 & 2 week short term survival exercises and was able to sharpen it with a flat rock whenever needed. A suggestion from Ethan Becker because of its blade thickness and design a BK2 will split wood wider than the blade length by driveing the tip down vertically into the wood an inch or so from the edge, instead of batoning horizontally. Like a splitting wedge it will cause the wood to split.
No knife does everything well, for me the BK 2 is an excellent compromise. Which is why its my go to blade, always on my hip in the bush or doing chores around the homestead. If I lost all my gear and had only one knife to survive with. The BK2 is what I would have on my hip and I know it will do everything I would need it to do, so that I could survive because I have done it.

The crack about packing an ax into the bush, is something I’d expect from a child or complete neophyte. As I said, COMPLETELY SEPARATE from the topic of having just one knife to survive with.

In the real world I always take an Gransfors Bruks Scandinavian Forest Axe or Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe and a Silky BigBoy or Silky Pro Series Saw and assortment of knives as part of my gear when I go camping or hiking for any length of time. On my bugout bag is a much larger double sided ax with one side profiled for felling and the other left stock for splitting. Obviously, unlike some I do not imagine myself to be bad ass enough to baton a winters worth of fire wood, build a long term shelter or log cabin with a Chinese made Cold Steel Tactical knife.
Apart from ultra light hikers that rely on their titanium REI/box store butane stoves, RV campers, family campers with their cook tents and coleman stoves, car campers at developed camp sites that play bush crafting battoning pre cut bundles of wood sold at the camp sites. Like those YouTube experts that baton perviously sawn segments of wood. Who doesn’t carry an ax hunting, camping, or hiking? For me carrying an ax is no big deal. my Becker Ranger Patrol Pack has a slot my ax fits in. Much better than spending my entire time camping battoning or chopping fire wood with a freakin knife. If a couple of pounds is to much weight and manning up getting some exercise is to much effort, dump something else, like a couple of freeze dried, dehydrated meals, a pack of 3600 calorie bars (3 day supply) weigh less than one of those meals I’d rather be without a sleeping bag or tent than without an ax and saw. I can make shelter with an ax and saw. I cannot chop down trees or split firewood with a tent. Fortunately I do not need to make that choice at 63 years old I am perfectly capable of carrying all the gear, tent, sleeping bags, water, clothing, food, shovel, ax, saw, knives, machete I need to camp. hike. fish, hunt comfortably for weeks at a time year round in any environment I choose to be in. With the skills knowledge and experience to use what I have or make do with I do not have.
 

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Wish I had the knife I bought back in 1968 when I was sent to the US Naval Jungle Survival School in the Philippines. It was made by the indigenous instructors. It only cost $10.00 & it got me through the thick and thin of my training. I carried it attached to my aviators survival vest, until I was given a freebie Randell. Like a fool I got rid of buy throwing out the window of my helicopter.
 
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