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Tankgirl
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I haven't posted on here in a really long time (long boring story of me checking out on life in general!) So hello all!

Anywhoo, i'm on a plethora of hardcore meds Fentnyl and Oxycodone being the hardest. I'm in the UK and I have a maximum of 28 days of my Fentanyl and 2 weeks of Oxycodone at any one time. Im not worried about the Oxycodone as I can take it or leave it. I hate that I have to be on meds and im a stubborn so 'n' so so I wont take my meds till absolutely desperate. but when it comes to the Fentanyl I don't have much choice. I can literally feel withdrawls even if im just a few hours late changing my patch. The thought of dealing with cold turkey and SHTF at the sme time is quite terrifying!

At the moment im dealing with my pain consultant on perhaps switching from opiates to Ketamine which would make things less scary but before that happens there's a lot of hoops I have to jump through (dealing with NHS) So it could be quite some time before that happens! does anyone have any advice on how you would go about dealig with SHTF and only 28 days of my meds etc?

Samantha \m/ \m
 

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Don't be dumb
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7,232 Posts
Hey all, I haven't posted on here in a really long time (long boring story of me checking out on life in general!) So hello all!

Anywhoo, i'm on a plethora of hardcore meds Fentnyl and Oxycodone being the hardest. I'm in the UK and I have a maximum of 28 days of my Fentanyl and 2 weeks of Oxycodone at any one time. Im not worried about the Oxycodone as I can take it or leave it. I hate that I have to be on meds and im a stubborn so 'n' so so I wont take my meds till absolutely desperate. but when it comes to the Fentanyl I don't have much choice. I can literally feel withdrawls even if im just a few hours late changing my patch. The thought of dealing with cold turkey and SHTF at the sme time is quite terrifying!

At the moment im dealing with my pain consultant on perhaps switching from opiates to Ketamine which would make things less scary but before that happens there's a lot of hoops I have to jump through (dealing with NHS) So it could be quite some time before that happens! does anyone have any advice on how you would go about dealig with SHTF and only 28 days of my meds etc?

Samantha \m/ \m
The only way to truly be ready for a SHTF event where you cannot get the patches is to get off the patches. Slowly wind down use and deal with what is causing the pain. Unfortunately at this time it sounds like you are solidly dependent on them which will make it extremely difficult to completely withdraw from their use.
 

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Registered
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Hey all, I haven't posted on here in a really long time (long boring story of me checking out on life in general!) So hello all!

Anywhoo, i'm on a plethora of hardcore meds Fentnyl and Oxycodone being the hardest. I'm in the UK and I have a maximum of 28 days of my Fentanyl and 2 weeks of Oxycodone at any one time. Im not worried about the Oxycodone as I can take it or leave it. I hate that I have to be on meds and im a stubborn so 'n' so so I wont take my meds till absolutely desperate. but when it comes to the Fentanyl I don't have much choice. I can literally feel withdrawls even if im just a few hours late changing my patch.


Samantha \m/ \m
4 hours a day, is 5 extra days of meds every 30 days.

That's an extra 60 days of meds a year.

Even if you only went 2, that woukd still be 30.

Be good for you to face that too.
 

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676 Posts
To taper off fentanyl, you would switched to another opioid, such as long-acting morphine or methadone. Then over a few weeks you cut the dosage unfortunately your pain will still be there. Suboxone is also used to get off the methadone. You have a much better chance of stockpiling pills over the patches. Did you ever run the the SHTF scenario by the pain consultant? Stopping cold turkey is basically going to make you bed ridden, best to have some type of instructions for who ever may be helping you out.
 

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This is why we keep certain strains of cannibus around (it is legal here). Right now I am nursing a broken foot and have a rx for an opioid, but I hate them. The right strain of cannibus works much better for me. Maybe it is time to start weaning yourself, save up the patches and try something else.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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American by Choice
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556 Posts
Hey all, I haven't posted on here in a really long time (long boring story of me checking out on life in general!) So hello all!

Anywhoo, i'm on a plethora of hardcore meds Fentnyl and Oxycodone being the hardest. I'm in the UK and I have a maximum of 28 days of my Fentanyl and 2 weeks of Oxycodone at any one time. Im not worried about the Oxycodone as I can take it or leave it. I hate that I have to be on meds and im a stubborn so 'n' so so I wont take my meds till absolutely desperate. but when it comes to the Fentanyl I don't have much choice. I can literally feel withdrawls even if im just a few hours late changing my patch. The thought of dealing with cold turkey and SHTF at the sme time is quite terrifying!

At the moment im dealing with my pain consultant on perhaps switching from opiates to Ketamine which would make things less scary but before that happens there's a lot of hoops I have to jump through (dealing with NHS) So it could be quite some time before that happens! does anyone have any advice on how you would go about dealig with SHTF and only 28 days of my meds etc?

Samantha \m/ \m
If you can "take it or leave it" with the Oxycodone, perhaps keep filling that prescription but take as little of it as possible so you can slowly build up an emergency supply. It's not Fentanyl, but it's SOMETHING to have in a potential emergency when you might otherwise have nothing.

Second: Keep filling your Fentanyl prescription every month, on time or early if possible. If they let you fill it a day or two early, then do that every single month. Even if you do nothing else, just filling it a day early each month would mean you have nearly an extra 2 week supply at the end of a year.

Also, change your patch as late as you can. Try to delay putting on the new patch for as long as you can withstand the withdrawal symptoms. Even if it's only a couple hours late, if you do that every single time, you will slowly build up a surplus as long as you refill on schedule every time.

Withdrawal symptoms can feel ugly, but over time you can learn to cope with them a little bit. If you're already on a lot of meds, there's a chance you're already taking one of the meds that can help reduce the severity of the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. If so, you can time when you take that medication to help with the brief withdrawal symptoms you'd experience from changing the patch late.

Some meds can have dangerous withdrawal symptoms if you stop cold-turkey, and need to be tapered down slowly to stop taking them. I am NOT an expert, but I'd be very surprised if any of those dangerous effects would kick in at the start, such as in the case of delaying the changing of a patch by a couple hours.

But as with all things, don't rely exclusively on advice from strangers on the internet. It can be useful to get ideas, but be sure to carefully research with authoritative sources before using any of the ideas listed in my post, or anywhere else in this thread. I know that should be obvious, but it had to be said.
 

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King of Canada
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4,421 Posts
If you can "take it or leave it" with the Oxycodone, perhaps keep filling that prescription but take as little of it as possible so you can slowly build up an emergency supply. It's not Fentanyl, but it's SOMETHING to have in a potential emergency when you might otherwise have nothing.

Second: Keep filling your Fentanyl prescription every month, on time or early if possible. If they let you fill it a day or two early, then do that every single month. Even if you do nothing else, just filling it a day early each month would mean you have nearly an extra 2 week supply at the end of a year.

Also, change your patch as late as you can. Try to delay putting on the new patch for as long as you can withstand the withdrawal symptoms. Even if it's only a couple hours late, if you do that every single time, you will slowly build up a surplus as long as you refill on schedule every time.

Withdrawal symptoms can feel ugly, but over time you can learn to cope with them a little bit. If you're already on a lot of meds, there's a chance you're already taking one of the meds that can help reduce the severity of the uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. If so, you can time when you take that medication to help with the brief withdrawal symptoms you'd experience from changing the patch late.

Some meds can have dangerous withdrawal symptoms if you stop cold-turkey, and need to be tapered down slowly to stop taking them. I am NOT an expert, but I'd be very surprised if any of those dangerous effects would kick in at the start, such as in the case of delaying the changing of a patch by a couple hours.

But as with all things, don't rely exclusively on advice from strangers on the internet. It can be useful to get ideas, but be sure to carefully research with authoritative sources before using any of the ideas listed in my post, or anywhere else in this thread. I know that should be obvious, but it had to be said.
Fentanyl withdrawals can happen extremely quick. Such as waiting a few extra hours.

Like I said, I know from experience with them. As with my Dad, who is on 300mu fentanyl daily.
 

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Registered
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My Dad and my wife were on both. It's like being a heroin addict without the needles. The patches are especially addictive. The both had major injuries and had a ton of pain and both became addicted.

Its hard to quit, but it is possible. The mistake is to get on something else. Bio-feedback and treating the cause (if possible) do work. Some people change their diet and take up yoga, exercise, etc. Every case is different.

The good news, is that is the event of SHTF, you will be forced to quit at some point or substitute something else.

It may not seem like it, but quitting is possible. Support groups are numerous. This will be hard, but quitting is the right thing to do.

Good Luck
 

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Tankgirl
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To taper off fentanyl, you would switched to another opioid, such as long-acting morphine or methadone. Then over a few weeks you cut the dosage unfortunately your pain will still be there. Suboxone is also used to get off the methadone. You have a much better chance of stockpiling pills over the patches. Did you ever run the the SHTF scenario by the pain consultant? Stopping cold turkey is basically going to make you bed ridden, best to have some type of instructions for who ever may be helping you out.
I did mention it to my pain consultant who then looked at me like a complete looney. You have to fight to get an extra weeks worth just if you're going to be away somewhere I do have a few extra patches, as I get away with saying my patch came off in the heat a day or something like that. Im in a wheelchair whether im on meds or not sadly that's just the nature of my disability unfortunately.
 

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Tankgirl
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This is why we keep certain strains of cannibus around (it is legal here). Right now I am nursing a broken foot and have a rx for an opioid, but I hate them. The right strain of cannibus works much better for me. Maybe it is time to start weaning yourself, save up the patches and try something else.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
I'm I the UK so Cannabis isn't legal but I do occasionally use it. if it wasn't crazy expensive id stockpile that but £20 worth lasts a few days when I use it for pain. I'm lucky enough to know what strain and where it's coming from etc, I would never risk buying weed that I didn't know where it came from! It was actually my pain consultant who (Unofficially, of course) recommended I tried it for pain relief. I had only ever used it for recreation when I was at college and Uni and didn't like how paranoid I got. But I do find when pain is extreme it helps.
 

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Tankgirl
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My Dad and my wife were on both. It's like being a heroin addict without the needles. The patches are especially addictive. The both had major injuries and had a ton of pain and both became addicted.

Its hard to quit, but it is possible. The mistake is to get on something else. Bio-feedback and treating the cause (if possible) do work. Some people change their diet and take up yoga, exercise, etc. Every case is different.

The good news, is that is the event of SHTF, you will be forced to quit at some point or substitute something else.

It may not seem like it, but quitting is possible. Support groups are numerous. This will be hard, but quitting is the right thing to do.


Good Luck
Sadly for me my multiple conditions cant be fixed with diet/yoga. however their usefulness isn't lost on me and I do push myself to do what I can when I can. I used to be a dancer so I know how important looking after my muscles etc is so important. I have a pilates board here which, when I can, I use for physical therapy but it can be quite a problem when you have multiple disorders and suffer several joint dislocations a day.

I know a lot of people would look at me and think well SHTF she's SOL every which way but as I said i'm a stubborn so n so, nothing will ever make me lay down n die iykwim? I'm also very lucky to have a very understanding partner who cares for me.
 

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Tankgirl
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Fentanyl withdrawals can happen extremely quick. Such as waiting a few extra hours.

Like I said, I know from experience with them. As with my Dad, who is on 300mu fentanyl daily.
i'm on 100micrgrams and have managed to stay on the same dose for nearly ten years now, 20mg 0xycodone 4hourly but I don't take anywhere near that but haven't had to change that dose either. That hasn't been an easy thing to do though it really does take a lot of pushing your pain tolerance. luckily I do I have a high pain tolerance though i'd hate to think what i'd be like right now if I didn't!
I'd love to try a ketamine coma but that's about as likely as seeing a unicorn when it comes to the NHS. For me to change over to just oral ket my consultant has to go and it with gosh knows how many boards etc as here its's not regularly used etc. at least if I switch over to that The physiological addiction is nothing compared to that of opiates! I'm also grateful not to have a psychological addiction also, i'm certain I would never be able to deal with both!
 

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American by Choice
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556 Posts
For me to change over to just oral ketamine my consultant has to go and it with gosh knows how many boards etc as here its's not regularly used etc. at least if I switch over to that The physiological addiction is nothing compared to that of opiates!
Ketamine is practically a wonder drug for certain uses, including battlefield medicine. However, I suggest you HEAVILY research what prolonged Ketamine use can do to a person before you make the leap of switching over to it for chronic pain management.

According to one article I read, regular use of Ketamine for a prolonged period can ruin your kidneys and entire urinary tract. I don't just mean "cause it some problems", I'm talking absolutely DESTROYING it, to the point that a kidney transplant might not be enough to save you, as even the bladder and ureter linings can be so damaged that they bleed constantly and would need to be replaced.

Ketamine is great for for use in emergency medicine, perhaps even short term pain management or for intermittent use in breakthrough pain in someone with chronic pain, but after what I've read I'd be scared to use it for long-term pain management.

Whatever you choose, I wish you well. Chronic illnesses are no party, let alone having to deal with multiple lifelong health conditions.

Just my opinion; I'm not a health-care professional.
 

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Tankgirl
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ketamine is practically a wonder drug for certain uses, including battlefield medicine. However, I suggest you HEAVILY research what prolonged Ketamine use can do to a person before you make the leap of switching over to it for chronic pain management.

According to one article I read, regular use of Ketamine for a prolonged period can ruin your kidneys and entire urinary tract. I don't just mean "cause it some problems", I'm talking absolutely DESTROYING it, to the point that a kidney transplant might not be enough to save you, as even the bladder and ureter linings can be so damaged that they bleed constantly and would need to be replaced.

Ketamine is great for for use in emergency medicine, perhaps even short term pain management or for intermittent use in breakthrough pain in someone with chronic pain, but after what I've read I'd be scared to use it for long-term pain management.

Whatever you choose, I wish you well. Chronic illnesses are no party, let alone having to deal with multiple lifelong health conditions.

Just my opinion; I'm not a health-care professional.
yeah im aware of the problems with kidneys etc. Its been a long time coming to this decision. |I already have a suprapubic catheter so pain consultant works closely with my urology consultant as well as my other consultants. The hope is that I will e able to manage using it for breakthrough only as that's my biggest issue. My pain consultant doc is pretty good and has been treating me since the very beginning of all my issues (since I was 17, im 32 now) just wish he'd take the whole shtf scenario seriously. I don't expect him to share the same views but it would be nice for him to take my thoughts about it seriously. God I wish I wasn't in the UK! lol
 

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gard'ner
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1,044 Posts
|I already have a suprapubic catheter so pain consultant works closely with my urology consultant as well as my other consultants.

My pain consultant doc is pretty good and has been treating me since the very beginning of all my issues (since I was 17, im 32 now) just wish he'd take the whole shtf scenario seriously.
Thanks for getting into specifics.

I think getting into some kind of detox would be very nearly impossible with a catheter and whatever condition makes having this necessary....

And.... I really can't imagine getting off these depressants any other way... And...
They are very unlikely to let you stock up.

Facing TEOTWAWKI as a junky needing a fix...

I can't think of any positive outcomes until you get the underlying condition resolved.
The addiction issue is a whole nother problem.

Are you waiting for a kidney transplant?
Is there a solution coming? Or did they put you on powerful pain meds for the rest of your life?
 
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