Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I didn't see any of these fantastic treats here, although I think they're mentioned in Foxfire ..either book one or two. They're basically just really sweet cornbread, baked in an old school hot-coal oven(A wrought iron frying pan without a handle on a little tripod, basically- with a heavy lid that is a little hollowed out so as to hold the coals). I love them because they're great in a primitive shelter situation- log cabin or hut.. anywhere with a fireplace or medium-to-large campfire. Our experiments with ash bread on camping trips with small to medium fires(1 to 3 logs) have resulted in doughy middles, which weren't entirely unenjoyable :3 Kind of like pudding filled cake. But if you want a firm, cake-textured cake(And WHO ON EARTH would want THAT!? :3 ), be sure to do it over a relatively intense fire, or to keep heaping hot coals on the lid every hour.

Be sure to sweep your hearth or oven(Brick or mud, not conventional!) very clean. If you're doing this in a campfire, then no worries :D You'll just need to wash your pot extra well afterwards(It's worth it).

Grease the inside of your pot, including the inside of the lid. I use a slab of bacon fat, but most folks prefer butter(Understandably, but use a GENEROUS layer, at least a greasy film, because it will cook off if you don't have enough). Don't use margarine, or if you do- report your results back, please! I was worried how it would react to such high temperatures if it might seperate or just boil away, etc.

half pound cornmeal
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons shortening
Water(Enough to make a stiff, thick dough)
4 tablespoons honey
1 cup sugar(Optional)

Mix all ingredients together and add enogh water to form a thick paste. I understand it can be made with milk, but I've never tried it done that way. Put the dough in the cooking oven and use your fingers to flatten it out a little bit. It doesn't have to be perfect, but it'll hit the oven lid and stick to it if you just dump the ball in there.
Use a little extra honey to drizzle over the top of the cake.
Place the lid on the pot, and push it over hot coals of the fire, and use a shovel or something to heap hot(Red, not black) coals over the lid. It should be about 50%-75% immersed in the coals. After 30 minutes, turn it 180 degrees and reheap coals. Check periodically after the first hour. It can take anywhere from 1-3 hours to cook, so it's a good idea to start it well before dinner, and it should be ready in time for dessert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
929 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yea, sorry :D I had forgotten what it was called. Dutch ovens can't be beat for one-pot dishes, especially on the trail. We've used them for everything cooking-wise(A personal favourite is venison stew) to burying them to help salt-cure venison(Just pack them with salt and the venison pieces you're curing, bury for two days and bring them up and take them to the smokehouse). If only they weren't so damned heavy!

Thanks for the link, these are pretty fantastic! I'm going to give this chili a try when I hit the trail next month
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top