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Wannabe Mountain Hermit
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I've loved Dominiqes AKA Domineckers and i've had them 3 years now and not 1 of them has gone broody. I wanted some who would go broody so I wouldn't have to depend on an incubator if the world went to hell. All of my research says that the Buff Orpington is known for going broody, raising chicks and has a gentle disposition. None to be found around here and most hatcheries don't have any until next month so I have an order in for 21 hens and 4 roosters. That way half will be for meat, the rest eggs and hopefully 1 of the 4 roos will be a calm fellow.
 

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I have heard reported that bantam breeds in general go broody more often, so that’s what I have in the coop right now. At least five months before I will know if itis true. I’ve also heard that Buff Orpington hens also go broody . I’ve had buffs for four years and not a one went broody. They were pretty mellow but no broodiness.
 

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Both my Buff Orphingtons and Blue Lace Wyondottes go broody. The Wyondottes actually seem to be better setters than my Orphingtons. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to hatch any out but that's due to my set up and not to the determination of my girls. I've had to pull both Orphingtons and Wyondottes off of a clutch of eggs after a month of setting.
 

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Geezer In Training
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I've raised chickens for the last 15 years... I've bought chicks from hatcheries, from the feed store, and even from locals that raised their own chicks... I've had a number of different breeds and noticed a lot of things through the years... The Buff Orpingtons and Barred Rocks were two of my favorites for egg production and overall disposition... I've had a number of hens offer to go broody, but very few would actually hatch a clutch of eggs... I had a number of them that would set on the eggs for a day or two and quit... Others would set for the full 21 day period, but I would notice that they would get up and spend long periods of time eating and drinking, and the eggs wouldn't hatch because they weren't keeping them warm enough... I had VERY FEW that would actually set on the eggs and hatch a clutch for me... The ones I got from the hatcheries and feed stores NEVER had a successful hatch... The only ones that were successful came from local guy I knew that had incubated hundreds of eggs to get his flock... He had several breeds in his flock and the majority of the eggs were crosses of either Barred Rock hens or Buff Orpington hens and Rhode Island Red roosters... These crossed hens I got from him were the BEST chickens I have ever had as far as raising chicks... I asked him why his hens were so good at this and the hatchery chicks were not... He told me, "Well, the hatcheries are growing chicks primarily for commercial chicken houses, and they don't want broody hens. They want chickens that will sit in a small cage all day and lay an egg every day like clockwork. The hatcheries are trying to breed the broodiness out of them, and they are pretty successful at it."

I think he was on to something...
 

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I've had four Wyandottes in the last 6 years and only one ever went broody. In the beginning of August. In Phoenix.

Needless to say, the chicks didn't hatch.

Right now I have two broody hens, a Naked Neck (4 years old) and Australorp (1 year old). First time for both, Australorp went broody first.

The eggs started hatching yesterday. The Naked Neck killed the first 3 that hatched out, until we figured out that she was doing it and kicked her out of the nesting area. Another hatched after, and is doing well with her Australorp mommy. We put the Naked Neck's eggs under the Australorp, and the ones she wasn't big enough to sit on are in a borrowed incubator right now.

Hoping tomorrow morning we'll have more chicks.
 

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The best homestead chicken I have ever had are Buff Orpington’s-they will go broody every spring and hatch out chicks dependably. My Wyandotte’s never went broody to my disappointment. Black Austrolorps (sp? It’s 6:20 am and no coffee yet) went 50/50 every spring on broodiness.
The workhouse of egg dependability, broodiness, hardiness, and the stewpot after egg laying ends are the Orpington’s.
This year I picked up a few Dominiques to try-they used to be sworn by in the Appalachians. I suppose I’ll see!
Orpington’s are not as hard to work with-more friendly.
 

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Both my Buff Orphingtons and Blue Lace Wyondottes go broody. The Wyondottes actually seem to be better setters than my Orphingtons. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to hatch any out but that's due to my set up and not to the determination of my girls. I've had to pull both Orphingtons and Wyondottes off of a clutch of eggs after a month of setting.
Thats’s odd. My Wyandotte’s would never sit and after 3 years, got rid of mine this year. They are the smartest chickens ever when free-ranging and findings bugs, but seemed too busy to ever be bothered with sitting.
I bet it’s what a poster above said-the hatcheries are trying to breed out broodiness, and it’s luck of the draw other than the motherly Orpington’s.
 

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Explosive, momma hen does not look like a game bird, what breed is she? Is she a volunteer mom?

New Wyandottes in brooder. Need a new roo so bought straight run. Roos are mean but protective. Have had Wyandottes get broody. Will see what this batch brings.
 

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think Buckeye Chickens if you want a sustainable meat source . They are very hardy and forage well. they put on enough weight to make them worth the effort and are known for evading predators and killing mice. They will go broody and are good mothers.
 

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Our BO rooster is huge and very, very gentle, our hens have gone broody several times but won't "stick it out" for the hatch (so far at least). A very nice breed IMO (and we have many breeds)

I've loved Dominiqes AKA Domineckers and i've had them 3 years now and not 1 of them has gone broody. I wanted some who would go broody so I wouldn't have to depend on an incubator if the world went to hell. All of my research says that the Buff Orpington is known for going broody, raising chicks and has a gentle disposition. None to be found around here and most hatcheries don't have any until next month so I have an order in for 21 hens and 4 roosters. That way half will be for meat, the rest eggs and hopefully 1 of the 4 roos will be a calm fellow.
 

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The only ones that were successful came from local guy I knew that had incubated hundreds of eggs to get his flock... He had several breeds in his flock and the majority of the eggs were crosses of either Barred Rock hens or Buff Orpington hens and Rhode Island Red roosters... These crossed hens I got from him were the BEST chickens I have ever had
That is interesting. And maybe there is something to that. Diversification of the bloodlines might be a really good thing for overall health of the birds. Seriously, it's like the difference between the health of a purebreed dog that's been bred to the nth degree and a "mutt". Often, the good ol' mutt is quite healthy.
 

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I recently gave one of my Buff Orpington a surprise this spring….
I had a load of eggs in the incubator, then after at about two weeks after starting the incubator a hen went broody.
So after the hatch I slipped the chicks under the broody hen.
She took to the chicks, so after she was only broody for about a week she had a flock of 25 chicks.😁😁😁
 

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Here's a problem I'm running in to:

We don't free range our chickens because in the desert, there just isn't enough food for them. We do let them out in the afternoons, but we must give them layer feed.

How do we work that with chicks with a mama? In the past, we've just kept store-bought chicks and grown hens separated until the chicks were grown, so we could give starter/grower to the young ones and layer feed to the adults.

How do we do this with them being together though? Do we let the chicks have layer feed? Feed them all starter/grower but give addt'l free oyster shell to the layers?
 

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Here's a problem I'm running in to:

We don't free range our chickens because in the desert, there just isn't enough food for them. We do let them out in the afternoons, but we must give them layer feed.

How do we work that with chicks with a mama? In the past, we've just kept store-bought chicks and grown hens separated until the chicks were grown, so we could give starter/grower to the young ones and layer feed to the adults.

How do we do this with them being together though? Do we let the chicks have layer feed? Feed them all starter/grower but give addt'l free oyster shell to the layers?
I have adult hens and 11 chicks . I block off a 3' area in the corner of the chicken house with plywood scraps for a hen and her chicks . I mix layer and starter feed together and also provide a water fountain with a baking pan under it to reduce the mess.. chicks must have starter or another source of grit. don't worry about what they eat , they'll be fine if they get out to forage a little.
 

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Here's a problem I'm running in to:

We don't free range our chickens because in the desert, there just isn't enough food for them. We do let them out in the afternoons, but we must give them layer feed.

How do we work that with chicks with a mama? In the past, we've just kept store-bought chicks and grown hens separated until the chicks were grown, so we could give starter/grower to the young ones and layer feed to the adults.

How do we do this with them being together though? Do we let the chicks have layer feed? Feed them all starter/grower but give addt'l free oyster shell to the layers?
To keep the adults out if the chick food I’ve used 2x4 welded wire fencing to “filter“ out the adults. Make a 3 foot ring with fencing & cut another piece to make a top. Then just place over the chick’s feeder and stake it to secure if necessary. As the chicks get bigger just cut out a couple pieces of the fencing to allow them through but still not the adults.
 
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