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I live in a town of 30000 people and the choices and quality of the Martial Arts clubs here is limited. Also with two young kids and my wife working a couple of evenings a week i'm very time poor so that limits my choices further.

The traditional kempo/jujitsu club i was training at before holds classes when my wife works so i cant go there.

The boxing club i attended was full of teenagers and i felt silly boxing high school kids. They also seemed to discourage any hard contact, which i thought was odd for a 'boxing' club!

Theres an MMA gym somewhere in town but you gotta know the right people to get in and a lot of the people i see sporting the club t-shirts also look like members of the local biker gang. i'm too old to play with these hard nuts.

I've just found out about a BJJ club in town though thats just come back from a competition in the city with a swag of medals. They seem like regular folk (no face tattoos!) and train 5 times a week. The instructor is happy if i just come once or twice a week to start with.

I've never liked ground fighting much, but it seems thats the way the winds are blowing with regards to common fighting styles. My feelings are that SD is culturaly specific and our culture is embracing the ground fighting systems as opposed to simple stand up brawling. I still have my doubts to its effectiveness for SD, but i'm willing to give it a go to see what all the fuss is about.

If i survive.... i'll let you know what i reckon.
 

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Wrestling is a good sport but i prefer all blade when i run out of bullets for combat.If martial arts were so great no soldiers would learn how to shoot they would just overun perimeters and do flying armbars on the enemy.
 

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FWIW my core martial art is Kali, i.e. very weaponry oriented, but I have spent plenty of time with BJJ over the last 22 years and am glad that I have.

Why?

It's fun, fit, and functional. If it ain't fun, we tend not to do it. It promotes fitness in a way that works for me. I find most forms of aerobic training really boring (and high rep stuff tough on my 60 year old body) but in BJJ the time flies by. And, lots of real world problems can wind up in a fouled up tangle. Knowing that one is competent and capable in such circumstances adds greatly to the efficacy of one's aggression. OTOH, if you doubt your abilities in this range, your will to attack may be quite diminished.

Also BJJ gives solutions that impose merely temporary costs on the person who is acting badly.
 

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Theres an MMA gym somewhere in town but you gotta know the right people to get in and a lot of the people i see sporting the club t-shirts also look like members of the local biker gang. i'm too old to play with these hard nuts.

I've just found out about a BJJ club in town though thats just come back from a competition in the city with a swag of medals. They seem like regular folk (no face tattoos!) and train 5 times a week. The instructor is happy if i just come once or twice a week to start with.

I've never liked ground fighting much, but it seems thats the way the winds are blowing with regards to common fighting styles. My feelings are that SD is culturaly specific and our culture is embracing the ground fighting systems as opposed to simple stand up brawling. I still have my doubts to its effectiveness for SD, but i'm willing to give it a go to see what all the fuss is about.

If i survive.... i'll let you know what i reckon.
You just want to roll around on the ground in your pajamas and get all sweaty with another bloke. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

It's okay, we're not here to judge you. (Much.) :D:

I'd investigate the MMA option as well; if you don't go, you won't know.

Keep us updated on your, err, conquests. :thumb:
 

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Wrestling is a good sport but i prefer all blade when i run out of bullets for combat.If martial arts were so great no soldiers would learn how to shoot they would just overun perimeters and do flying armbars on the enemy.
Citizens don't carry guns here, mate.

We're in the same boat (or sinking ship, depending how you look at it) as UK folk.

You can carry a knife, but you'd better have a very good reason for doing so. Self-defence isn't a reason that's accepted.
 

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I've never liked ground fighting much, but it seems thats the way the winds are blowing with regards to common fighting styles. My feelings are that SD is culturaly specific and our culture is embracing the ground fighting systems as opposed to simple stand up brawling.
That's the best argument for taking classes and learning what they're doing. It's becoming more and more likely that you'll have to defend yourself against someone using BJJ in a fight. You don't want to be totally clueless about their techniques and get choked unconscious or have your arm broken.
 

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I am old school Japanese jujutsu, they invented it (not really, every culture had grappling and the Chinese grappling is very similar in many ways to the Japanese).

However, any of the grappling arts are great in that they are more like real fighting than some striking schools that may pad up or just do kata cause "our style is too deadly". To be well rounded you will need to learn striking and sparing. Don't forget to spar against weapons, not just with them!


"Originally Posted by PapaWhiskyBravo My feelings are that SD is culturaly specific"

Yes! Train in knives, short sticks, baseball bats, guns...not Katana, sai, King Fu pole arm.

Any martial art you study is good if it meets your needs. Are your needs fitness? You may never get into a fight but you need to be fit everyday no matter your age. Is it self defence? Some BJJ schools are good at that but others focus too much on the weponless ground aspects.

Don't put the guy down for training in what is in his area. We are all limited to what schools/teachers are in our area. Once you become a martial artist for a while you understand enough that you can then look at DVDs and understand how to tweek your system to a reasonable level.

Don't forget your brain at the dojo door! There are several books on the market dealing with real life attacks and how they happened and what was the result:

"The Little Black Book of Violence" by Lawrence Kane and kris Wilder is excellent! (No it is not one of those pressure point books as the title sounds like) YMMA Publication Center

"No Second Chance, A Reality-Based Guide to Self Defense" by Mark Hatmaker is another good one. Tracks Publishing

Both have a few techniques but they are not technique books, they are "How it is in real life" books.

There is also another one called "Surviving Armed Assults", that look pretty good but I have not bought it yet, only looked at it in the store.

Best wishes for your training.
 

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Wrestling is a good sport but i prefer all blade when i run out of bullets for combat.If martial arts were so great no soldiers would learn how to shoot they would just overun perimeters and do flying armbars on the enemy.
if you are running around shooting people then you are going to prison.

martial arts is great for defense.

just because someone squares up to you doesnt mean you can pull out your gun and shoot them
 

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That's the best argument for taking classes and learning what they're doing. It's becoming more and more likely that you'll have to defend yourself against someone using BJJ in a fight. You don't want to be totally clueless about their techniques and get choked unconscious or have your arm broken.
from my experience, bjj practioners arent running around attacking people.

maybe it is different in aus.
 

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I live in a town of 30000 people and the choices and quality of the Martial Arts clubs here is limited. Also with two young kids and my wife working a couple of evenings a week i'm very time poor so that limits my choices further.

The traditional kempo/jujitsu club i was training at before holds classes when my wife works so i cant go there.

The boxing club i attended was full of teenagers and i felt silly boxing high school kids. They also seemed to discourage any hard contact, which i thought was odd for a 'boxing' club!

Theres an MMA gym somewhere in town but you gotta know the right people to get in and a lot of the people i see sporting the club t-shirts also look like members of the local biker gang. i'm too old to play with these hard nuts.

I've just found out about a BJJ club in town though thats just come back from a competition in the city with a swag of medals. They seem like regular folk (no face tattoos!) and train 5 times a week. The instructor is happy if i just come once or twice a week to start with.

I've never liked ground fighting much, but it seems thats the way the winds are blowing with regards to common fighting styles. My feelings are that SD is culturaly specific and our culture is embracing the ground fighting systems as opposed to simple stand up brawling. I still have my doubts to its effectiveness for SD, but i'm willing to give it a go to see what all the fuss is about.

If i survive.... i'll let you know what i reckon.
Ive never heard of an mma school that didnt allow pretty much anyone to just sign up.
Again, things are very different in aus i guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ho-lee crap what a workout! Class was nearly 3 hours long, i'm stiff and sore this morning with a bruised larynx.

It turns out the club is much like an MMA club. They focus on BJJ and enter BJJ comps, but do a lot of striking techniques. I saw a lot of the guys doing Muay Thai type kicks on the bags.

We started off with 'The Bible'. A deck of cards is put in the middle of the room and the sensai(?) turns the top card over. Each suit represents a different exercise ie clubs=burpees, spades =pushups etc. the number on the card denotes the reps with jokers worth 50. We did the WHOLE deck. That was the 'warm up'.

Then it was on to pad work. Punch for a minute. Stop. Repeat. Then a Tony Blauer type defense and strike.

Using that same technique we trained down on the mat and did a lot of grappling techniques.

Then into free wrestling. They asked me if i was game to play and i said 'for sure.' I got ass handed to me by everyone of course. A big fellow got me in a choke and i felt like it wouldve crushed my larynx if i didnt tap fast enough. It still hurts to swallow this morning. Grappling is a whole new language to me and surprisingly its very cerebral. You gotta think the whole time as there are so many variables and they are constantly changing.

The most surprising thing about the whole experience was the level of respect and friendliness shown by nearly everyone. They are a tight unit and the sensai is a great leader. Always motivating and always keeping a firm control on the class.

I am deeply impressed to be honest. The focus on fitness, the level of respect shown and the powerful practical techniques have sold me on it.

I'll be going back for sure... once i can swallow without wincing that is!
 

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Sounds like my first class at a local bjj club. I looked at the school's online schedule and it said "Beginners BJJ-Gi" on Friday night. So I show up in my brand spankin new bright white Gameness gi only to find out they hadn't updated their website and Friday night was now "Advanced No-gi". Needless to say everyone got a good laugh but they pretty much used me as a choking toy. The hardest thing to learn at first was knowing when to tap. The first time I got choked I tapped really quick and the guy kinda looked at me with a funny face and said he didn't really have it in that tight. So the next time I got caught I tried to hold out as long as I could and I briefly went out as I was tapping!
I also know what you mean as far as being very cerebral, which is why I ultimately stopped going. It was almost too difficult, and after a 10 hour work day in a hot restaurant kitchen I found myself losing focus on some of the more intricate techniques when training, I kept looking at the clock and it wasn't really fun. I get much more enjoyment out of muay thai, but thats just me! Either way, sounds like you found a good club! Enjoy!
 

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Wrestling is a good sport but i prefer all blade when i run out of bullets for combat.If martial arts were so great no soldiers would learn how to shoot they would just overun perimeters and do flying armbars on the enemy.
Hand to hand combat is considered the First Line of combat.
 

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Ho-lee crap what a workout! Class was nearly 3 hours long, i'm stiff and sore this morning with a bruised larynx.

It turns out the club is much like an MMA club. They focus on BJJ and enter BJJ comps, but do a lot of striking techniques. I saw a lot of the guys doing Muay Thai type kicks on the bags.

We started off with 'The Bible'. A deck of cards is put in the middle of the room and the sensai(?) turns the top card over. Each suit represents a different exercise ie clubs=burpees, spades =pushups etc. the number on the card denotes the reps with jokers worth 50. We did the WHOLE deck. That was the 'warm up'.

Then it was on to pad work. Punch for a minute. Stop. Repeat. Then a Tony Blauer type defense and strike.

Using that same technique we trained down on the mat and did a lot of grappling techniques.

Then into free wrestling. They asked me if i was game to play and i said 'for sure.' I got ass handed to me by everyone of course. A big fellow got me in a choke and i felt like it wouldve crushed my larynx if i didnt tap fast enough. It still hurts to swallow this morning. Grappling is a whole new language to me and surprisingly its very cerebral. You gotta think the whole time as there are so many variables and they are constantly changing.

The most surprising thing about the whole experience was the level of respect and friendliness shown by nearly everyone. They are a tight unit and the sensai is a great leader. Always motivating and always keeping a firm control on the class.

I am deeply impressed to be honest. The focus on fitness, the level of respect shown and the powerful practical techniques have sold me on it.

I'll be going back for sure... once i can swallow without wincing that is!

What is the name of the school? Also what team, if any, are they with. I know a guy that operates a school in Australia and I wondering it is the same school. The free wrestling you are referring to is called sparring or rolling in BJJ by the way.

Sounds like a legit school I just hope they have a beginners class or you might get burned out real quick. This is one of the problems with most BJJ schools. They lack a beginners course and a lot of beginners get frustrated because they have no idea what they are doing and they eventually quit. I am surprised they let you spar on the fist day. That is something I don't allow at my school because it is a good way to get hurt as you found out the hard way with a sore throat.

Beginners must be taught basic movement and basic techniques to the point of proficiency before sparring at 100%. This keeps student ratio high and makes it safe training environment for everyone. Once a beginner is ready then they can train hard with the higher belts.
 

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from my experience, bjj practioners arent running around attacking people.

maybe it is different in aus.
You don't think bullies, thugs, and criminals are picking up on BJJ techniques? UFC shows are free on TV every night and the videos have been passed around for years. You can learn lots of stuff on Youtube. I'm positive bad guys are out there learning enough to be dangerous.
 
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