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I come in peace..
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw some posts about this but cant find it! I need to use oil on mystones, :D: but I dont want to spend the $20 for the bottle. Can I use something cheaper? Like a olive oil, or WD40? I dont want to use something wrong for my stones or somthing that will F it all up! :eek:
 

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The butcher that trained me to be a meat cutter used plain mineral oil on his stones. You can get it in maybe half-pint bottles at most drug stores and only for a couple of dollars best I remember.
I prefer using clean water on my stones, makes them much easier to clean after use than any oil I have tried and doesn't get them plugged up with metal shavings. Plus, I'm still quite able to produce hair splittin' and hair shavin' edges on all of my knives when they require sharpening. Usually I just stroke a steel to re-align the edge after use, keeps from having to sharpen so much.
 

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I come in peace..
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So even though Hall's says to use oil, I can substitute water or mineral oil, or nothing at all? Just wantedd to be sure cause I think they say to use oil.
 

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Knowledge is Power
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I don't use oil. The oil traps metal shavings in the fluid which grind against the blade and provide, in my opinion, inferior edges. I use medium grit stones to create the relief at an angle of about 15 degrees and then put the edge on the blades at about 19 degrees, then I finish up with a sharpening steel at about 19 degrees to finish the edge. My knives always shave just fine. I haven't used oil for about 10 years and have sharpened hundreds of knives (for family and friends) to razor sharpness every time.

However, it is possible that oils work just as well, but know that you can get a sharp edge without oil.
 

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Not familiar with Hall's system, I've always used aluminum oxide stones and Arkansas stones with water. Tried various oils; 3-n-1, WD-40, Singer sewing machine, motor oil, cooking oils, etc, at first like various stone providers recommended but the stones would get clogged with metal particles that prevented the sharp edges I wanted and, cleaning the stones to remove the metal and oil was next to impossible.
I switched to water and have never looked back. I do keep the stone as wet as I can keep it by either wetting it often or holding it under running water while I sharpen the edge.
A dry stone is not a good method of sharpening knives or other thin edges, using one dry will damage the edge of any thin edged knife because there is no lubricant or coolant. Water and oil serve that purpose to protect that thin edge. Don't sharpen thin edges dry. Honestly, I do sharpen one specific knife dry but it is for a specific reason too. That knife si used to cut foam insulation and requires an edge that is serrated, a smooth edge will not cut this well. I use a rough stone to sharpen this edge and do it dry to form the serrated like edge and the foam cuts like hot butter. One thing about this though, the knife does not have a long life but, they're cheap to begin with. No harm no foul.
Axes and other type cutting implements can be sharpened dry if done properly. Slowly actually so that heat does not buildup and damage the edge temper. Oil or water would be beneficial to sharpening these as well but, I sharpen axes and machetes dry.
Oil or water to use on sharpening stones is older than "AR or AK?" so, find what works best for you and stick with it.
 

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Maximus
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I stopped using oils also. I only use water on my ultra-fine stones. For medium stones, I don't use water or oil. But I wash them down to get the metal off when I am done sharpening or I feel it clogging.
 

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I come in peace..
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thnx for replying fellas

I didnt use any lub on my little smiths soft stone.

I will prob try water on my Halls stones.
 

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Just plain water, or kerosene/diesel fuel will float the particles away. I havent used oil in 40+years
 

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I got my stone mounted on a 6" by 2" board that I place under the tap on the kitchen sink and have the water just slowly dribleing. Works well for me. any were else I keep a cup or a bottle of water and frequently wet the stone. I have heard of people using straight dishwashing liquid on a stone if you fell the need to use a oil like substance.

To clean a old oil clogged stone the best way I have found is put it in the dishwasher, they clean up real well.
 

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Insert Name Here
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The ones on here that are saying to use water instead of oil..............they know what they are talking about.
 

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Been sharpening knives since the 60's and have never put oil on a stone.

Sure they call them oil stones but....
 

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Worked in a butcher shop for a couple of years. Some of the guys used oil and their stones were always nasty clogged. I used water on mine and never got them as bad off as the oil users.
I did use oil at first but, the stones got clogged quickly and I had to work harder to get a good edge. I switched to water on the recommendation of one of the butchers and haven't looked back.
Oil or water is definitely a personal issue and water is my recommendation but, try both of them and find what works best for you.
 
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