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I agree with Chris it can be a pain in the you know what. I have land off the grid and you have to figure how to power things up, drill a well and power it, septic system. The power part is the real kick in the behind. Generators can't run 24/7. Solar and wind are out of sight expensive and the battery storage part is a real treat. If you do plan to do it go into it with open eyes. Do your research and see if you can even get water on your land. Do people on adjacent properties have wells?

If you have hills try to build into the sides of one to cut down on utility costs. earthen covering is a blessing to heat and cool.
 

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Off grid is.....well......disconected from the grid:D: ya don't have to be that far in the sticks. Get a place with power to start then start building up your solar,wind,water,power so one day when you got all your stuff together cut it loose or have the power co. install a meter where you could sell your xtra back to them :thumb: i think water is the best but it's tough finding just the right place,it'll run 24/7. :cool: I had the perfect 200 acres now i'm kicking myself in the a$$ for selling
 

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Not that kind of off the grid, I'm talking about a cabin deep in the woods, no electricity, stream for water, outhouse for your business, and wood burning stove for cooking and heating. It might be hard but it would be a cool life experience.
 

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Looking at 40 acres tomorrow...

Totally off the grid...but it has a spring! Right in the middle of the winter migration route for deer as well.
No rainfall to speak of all year so checking the spring tomorrow will be a good indication of how well it produces in a low rainfall year (last year).
 

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Totally off the grid...but it has a spring! Right in the middle of the winter migration route for deer as well.
No rainfall to speak of all year so checking the spring tomorrow will be a good indication of how well it produces in a low rainfall year (last year).
wanna pump water no power?http://virtual.clemson.edu/groups/irrig/Equip/ram.htm
check this one http://www.angelfire.com/ak5/energy21/savonius.htm
I have a ton of hydro sites in my other pc but it's packed away:(
you have to find out the flow rate and the height in witch it falls to see how much power you could get, i'll keep looking;)
 

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Wife and I have just started the planning phase of this transition and I assume your unmarried wit no kids if you aren't make sure the wifes on board or this is a one way trip to divorce court. :D:

The first thing we did was look at what other people where saying about it. Be careful with your sources. If your a hunter or have killed and animal in the past for food your a step ahead of a lot of the "Let's move to the country and get a simpler life crowd." Living rural where you don't have garbage pick up, fire, police and ambulance takes a lot more planning and prep then people think. You've removed the power, telephone, natural gas connection. So no bills right up until you need a car/truck for medical emergencies/getting supplies. The other option is a cell for emergencies so either you'll need a trust fund or a job( or reallly understanding parents) . Job needs car because you can't walk to work if you living that rural.

Which leads to problem number two land tax even legal homesteaders are required to pay land tax if they are given title over time to the land by improving it (don't even know if this is possible any more in North America). I wouldn't suggest just moving to the woods and living in a national park or some such. There your just living as a refugee and from my perspective your affectively homeless. Buying is the way to go unless you want to get arrested and charged. So again the need for a job to pay for it. :xeye: I am assuming you would not consider stealing to live your lifestyle. If you would well that's up to you and everything I have to say is pointless.

After you've settled the land/tax/getting charged problem. You will need to have tools and lets assume your going totally hand tool. Great now you have a lot of days ahead of you getting wood, food, and water.

Wood well that's easy an Axe a bow saw and a lot of sweat. But you will have time as your working part time to cover the land taxes and your land is paid off. Course it does depend on your seasons if it's not really cold where you live you can reduce this time. Me I'm looking to a chainsaw and a good splitter Axe. Make sure your land has wood on it nothing worse then using a Bow saw to get wood from a blow down in another persons yard they are not going to be happy you didn't bring a chain saw. :D:


The food will be a slight problem as most places have hunting seasons in place (more damn money) If your gathering from nature make sure your skills are top notch for your area as some plants look close to each other and some need special work so you can eat them. Don't buy a guide the think it will do practice the skills before your life is on the line.


If you go the farming method you'll need money to buy animals at first and you will make mistakes with them at first. So it's best to have some money in the bank if you mess up. Plus harvests are variable from year to year. Right now I only have a flower bed to work with last year we had enough Tomatoes that we gave them away to other people. This year we got five for us and maybe ten total for the Mother in Law. So again a safety net is best. We are farming for ours I worked on one for years and would like a chance to spend time with animals again. (way better then people anyway)

You'll need a method for saving your food depending on growing season no power means propane powered fridge (I think your hitting a full time job at this point:D:) or no fridge and a root cellar/canning set up. So you'll need a canner and a root cellar. The canner will cost you a little but it's worth it as it doesn't require power to use (however you'll need canning supplies every few years or so). Not to mention the skills to do the canning work involved. No to mention cooking on a wood stove. I also mention the canner as if you buy a big one it should work as a way to boil your water. BTW for meat you'll need a Pressure Canner. An outside kitchen is a must in the hotter areas as you'll bake yourself without one during the sumer and at canning seasons. Or at least be really uncomfortable. Another option would be the use of dehydrating and smoking of foods still need the root cellar though lots of work there. We are planning an indoor Cook stove and an outdoor kitchen by the first summer( we'll see). We are getting power into the yard but looking at reducing it's use as much as possible. So I think maybe a bar fridge for us to hold milk and leftovers that aren't ready for the worms. Trying to avoid a freezer if we can I think smoking, Jerky making and canning will do it :rolleyes:.

If your looking at one person and their water needs not a really problem sponge bath anyone and laundry can be done in a creak/laundry tub. When my wife and I first got together we didn't have laundry money every month so we washed them in the bath tub with foot power. It worked I like machines but heh. If it works it works. Make sure your cook stove has a water reserve it will heat up and be usable later. If you use water try using it twice or three times. When we use to do the laundry trick we also used the bath water after the kids used it. Waste not, want not.

I've gotten a lot of good advice here and the majority of people here as I have read it are at about 80% of their food needs. It's a little bit harder to be totally self sufficient because with hand tools you get into the need to make then which requires steel and blacksmithing skills. For a short term it is doable I think but long term gets a little tricky lots to give up for basically more work. I'm doing it because I like to control as much as I can in my life even if I couldn't live on the land at 100% without anyone the more I can do on my own and for my self the better. I am no expert but this is my serious thinking on it. I started with the idea of grid free then wife said no and we changed to reducing Grid needs.
 

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Stay on the grid as long as possible you can always go off with the flick of a switch and someone else may be throwin the switch one day. I lived with one light bulb and hauled all our water and such we spent lots of time at it and all of it was hard work. theres only 24 hours in a day and even if you sleep only 5 theres still not enough time make life as easy as possible the hard times will be back soon enough from the look of things.............
 
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