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How would a person get salt and spices during a time when there is little or no functional economy on a wide scale? I talked to a lady who I work with who is into primitive survival, and often goes to rendezvous, and she said that it would slowly make its way inward into the country from the coasts.

But I wanted to ask you guys for another opinion. And what about spices like pepper and other ones?

Thanks
 

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I'm the boogey man.......
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distill sea water
 

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BowHunter
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How would a person get salt and spices during a time when there is little or no functional economy on a wide scale? I talked to a lady who I work with who is into primitive survival, and often goes to rendezvous, and she said that it would slowly make its way inward into the country from the coasts.

But I wanted to ask you guys for another opinion. And what about spices like pepper and other ones?

Thanks
Spices you are pretty much boned,as far as salt,google for salt mine or collection places in your area.
 

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IMO it will be like food, if you don't have it before you probably won't have it after. Spices are still cheap for the most part. I would just try to stock up now because what ever makes its way from the coasts will have a high price on it given its limited supply. There are somethings you can grow but thats very limited.
 

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If there is a market, and there will be, some entrepreneur will set up a trade route to the Carribean, Mediterranian, and the Far East to bring them in. In the meantime, there will be savy preppers that will have stockpiled huge amounts for barter and trade.

Salt is available in Arkansas and other inland places. Sugar from the Gulf coast.
 

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Watchin tha world go by
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stockpile it, grow it, and learn what nature provides.
 

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Deo VIndice
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Yes, but I can't if I live in the Midwest.

As for spices, which ones do you guys recommend stocking up on? Like which ones are the more important ones. Also, which ones are used for preserving food?

Thanks.
The big ones for me, so far have been:
Salt (20 #)
Pepper (5#)
Sugar (50#)
Hot pepper flakes (13.5oz x2)
Garlic Powder (22oz x2)
Paprika (2oz x4)
Vanilla (4oz x3)
Oregano (20oz)
Blackened chicken spice (2 oz x8)
Cinnamon (20 oz)
Onion powder (12oz)
Cayenne (16oz x2)
Chili powder (20oz x2)
Taco Seasoning (23oz x2)
and a few more I can't recall at the moment. The larger ones except salt I get at sams...the smaller ones from dollar stores, including salt. :)
 

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I'm not a spice eater so spice isn't my biggest problem. Being from a farming area I get good fresh food that taste good all by itself. Salt is something I stockpile, not because I eat a lot of it but because in a world without refrideration salt is a good preserver. I figure I'll get all my body needs from preserved food. If you live far away from the ocean check and see where the closest salt mine is to you. There are plenty of them in the US and to be sure that once the dust settles salt will be mined again. All we need to do is have enough to get us through until the dust settles. The closest salt mines to me would be Michigan. I figure that if we had a society collapse that would be one of my winter journeys, after the crops were in I'd head off to the trading posts in Michigan and trade for salt. Probably get together a traveling party as to have others watch our backs. It would probably be a 6 week journey but anyone who thinks they won't have these long journeys if society collapsed is fooling themselves. Once the dust settles we would be moving a lot because right now it is our food that is doing the moving for us.

Tury
 

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I grow alot of herbs, i am sure i will have to learn how to dry and preserve them. How long they stay good i will have to just have to experiment with..I guess salt will stay good for a long time, if it is kept dry?
 

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People that live along the sea could boil the water until there is only salt left, then take it inland and trade.

When lewis and clark reached the pacific ocean they were almost out of trade items. A group of men were put to work with the sole purpose of boiling sea water for salt. On the return trip, their primary trade item was the sea salt.

Spices - you should have peppers seeds in your seed stocks. And not just jalapeno peppers, include all kinds of peppers.

A buddy of mine told me about this pepper, so I thought I would share the information with you.

This is a wild pepper. What I do not know is if this pepper has to be replanted every year. Since this is a wild pepper that has survived thousands of years, I would guess that it might not have to be replanted. Does it sprout from dropped peppers, or does the plant rebloom in the spring - this I do not know.

The idea is to plant a small plot of these, kinda like grapes. The peppers can be ground into powder and used as a spice.

Being from the southern states, these plants might not tolerate cold very well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiltepin

Chiltepin is a wild chile pepper that grows in Mexico and the southwestern United States. It is sometimes called the "mother of all peppers," because it is thought to be the oldest species in the Capsicum genus.

The chiles are extremely hot, rating 50,000 to 100,000 Scoville units, but the heat quickly dissipates.

The Wild Chile Botanical Area in the Coronado National Forest near Tucson, Arizona has the largest population of chiltepin chile peppers north of Mexico. It is the state native pepper of Texas.

Chiltepins are one of the few crops in the world which are harvested in the wild rather than cultivated. (Others are mushrooms, piñon nuts, Brazil nuts, and some wild rice.)In the wild, piquins can grow 6 feet high or more, and in the greenhouse they have grown 15 feet high in one season. However, some varieties have a prostrate habit, spreading across the ground like a ground cover.
 

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Kev, thanks for the link.

We had Chiltepin peppers when I was growing up, but I didn't know what they were called since my mom called them bird peppers. The birds like to eat the peppers and the plants grow wild from the seeds in the bird droppings.

I bought two Chili Pequin plants this past spring thinking they were the same plant, but these peppers are oval and they are longer than the ones I remembered.

A co-worker's mother gave me a plant, but I didn't get to find out if it was a Chiltepin or Chili Pequin plant because some animal (probably a hog) dug up the plant while I was out of town. I'm going to beg my co-worker for some seeds when I get ready to plant my spring garden. Her father saves the seeds every year so that he can replant them in his spring garden. I need to save seeds from the pepper plants that I do have too.

On other spices, I am storing what I can't grow and getting seeds for annual spices like Basil. I also have some onion bulbs, but I don't know if they will keep until my spring garden. This past weekend, I planted a lot of garlic.

I have a lot of perennial herbs planted and I'm looking for those that I don't have. I am presently trying to grow Loveage. I have about 5 little seedlings. It is a periennel herb and can be substituted for celery. The whole plant is edible. However, I heard that it may not take to our Texas summers. I'm hoping that it will grow here in Texas if I plant it in a partial shaded area.
 

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countryboy,

there is a salt mine under Detroit that i went to as a kid.

Also, just buy a bunch of salt now, it doesnt spoil and is cheap.
 

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My answer is a simple one "Buy it before you need it beacause later on you won't be able to buy it when you need it"......... I won't do my whole list but I do have 500 lbs of sugar and 250 lbs of salt.

While is good to think ahead by asking "What would happen if?" it is bette to buy what you can now and by the time that you have had ran out of the item the question would have been answered by other that DID NOT have what you did.
 

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Spices to me are a convenience, not a need.

One of the things I had started doing a long while back actually was preparing my foods with alot less and often no seasoning at all. Not even in the name of preparation really, but just for the simple sake of I get tired of having everything so often drowned in seasoning. (especially where I live in south west louisiana, everything often tastes the same drowned in cajun seasoning)

But from a survival stand point it makes sense to get use to using alot less if any.

Once I feel I am adequatly supplied on other must have items, I would certainly not mind stocking up on seasonings because I do still enjoy them of course and they improve food tastes in many situations.

But I will stick with the basics, and also lean more towards herbs, which can offer alot more nutrional value and in some cases medicinal value. Can dry them to store them or always keep a seed supply of the herbs that grow best in your climate.

If you have a good BOL to store food items in, I would think it would not be to difficult to stock up on a nice supply of salt, pepper, and sugar at the very least. Garlic powder would be next on my list as well.
 

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If you have a good BOL to store food items in, I would think it would not be to difficult to stock up on a nice supply of salt, pepper, and sugar at the very least. Garlic powder would be next on my list as well.
From what I have seen, garlic can be left in the ground and will root again. My step son has a row of garlic that was planted by his grand father about 5 years ago. Every year it grows back. Plant it, forget it, and dig it up as you need it.

P,lant you some Chiltepin peppers and some garlic also onions can be kept from year to year. When its time to plant, the onion bulbs will start sprouting, so just plant them. That gives you 3 types of spices that you should be able to keep in stock.
 

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Salt is so valuable, that roman soliders used to be paid with salt. One can't live for long without it. It's easy and cheap to obtain now, it won't after a meltdown. So get it yesterday. It will also be a trade good when times get tough. Salt will keep forever if keep dry.

Now if one is going to start salt curing meats ala the pioneers, one is going to need to stock BARRELS of it. For the curing processes are going be very intensive on it. The small container from the supermarket isn't going to cut it. That and I would start learning now how to salt cure meats versus after the meltdown. There will be a learning curve to it as with any skill. After the fact if you do something wrong it could mean the next meal won't arrive to the table.





Rifleman 336
 

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Learn what you can eat in the wild. Rose Hips ,sage,wild onion,pine nuts,lilac and a bunch of others if you find out where they grow and know how to prepaire them. Find out which plants have medical benefits. Willow bark can be boiled and you get an asprine like medicine.
 

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The Morton Salt company mines are just east of DFW in Grand Saline TX. You need to stock up on most used products and keep some for barter purposes. Growing herbs and spices is a must if you are really into the lifestyle.
 
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