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Discussion Starter #1
The scenario: You build a nuclear bomb shelter in your backyard. It has one entrance, which resembles either a manhole or a storm cellar door. A nuclear exchange happens, you get into your shelter in time, but when the all-clear sounds, you try to exit and find that some large debris has been blasted atop the door and is blocking you in.

How can you prepare for this contingency ahead of time? If there some kind of hand-powered jack that you could rig up to the doorway to lift up any such debris? If so, can someone give me a link? Could you smash through the opposite wall and dig your way out? If so, how would this affect initial wall construction? Any other solutions?
 

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DONT TREAD ON ME
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In a Fallout shelter it is necessary to have two openings, 1 main entrance/exit and 1 emergency entrance/exit. This is needed for two reasons, the first reason is for the situation that you have described and the second and more important reason is ventilation. Without two openings the occupants will not have enough air to survive the fallout and they will most likely leave the shelter to get more air and then die later from gamma radiation exposure. However if you do have two openings and they are both blocked then a hydraulic car jack and a long 4x4 or steel pipe would probably be able to lift the hatch to escape. For more info on Nuclear shelters check out Nuclear War Survival Skills @ www.ki4u.com/free_book/s73p911.htm
 

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Some type of second entrance/exit or escape tunnel should be incorporated now, before use.

If not possible, a mechanical track jack might do. You'd need at least one jack, and heavy pipe or timber to reach between the jack on the floor and the hatch. http://www.tksimplex.com/html/railroad_products.html

A bottle jack is another possibility, but it would need to be a high capacity one.

Either way, you'd need blocking stored to secure the overhead load in place as you make an exit through it.

If you can incorporate a hatch in the side of the shelter, even without an existing tunnel exit, you can keep excavation tools in the shelter an dig your way out using the hatch in the side of the shelter to gain access to the dirt.

For a cave, exlpore it (safely) to find an alternate exit. If there isn't one, arrangements should be made (excavation tools, jacks, timbers, etc) to extricate yoursef from inside the cave.

It is far better to have at least two ways out, separated by some distance, than hope to dig your way out. Though the means should be at hand to do so, even with an alternate exit.

If you don't want a visible escape point, create a tunnel from the shelter using culvert pipe or concrete drain pipe 30" or so in diameter. At the far end set a section on end that comes within a inches of the surface and extends down a couple of feet below the level of the tunnel. Rig a flap door in the vertical part of the exit and when the time comes, you can release the flap and let the dirt fall into the lower chamber, with the assistance of an e-tool if necessary.
 

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In a Fallout shelter it is necessary to have two openings, 1 main entrance/exit and 1 emergency entrance/exit. This is needed for two reasons, the first reason is for the situation that you have described and the second and more important reason is ventilation. Without two openings the occupants will not have enough air to survive the fallout and they will most likely leave the shelter to get more air and then die later from gamma radiation exposure. However if you do have two openings and they are both blocked then a hydraulic car jack and a long 4x4 or steel pipe would probably be able to lift the hatch to escape. For more info on Nuclear shelters check out Nuclear War Survival Skills @ www.ki4u.com/free_book/s73p911.htm

I second that, CPL Young is right. You need 2 entrances/exits. I personally would have 3 if I ever get to build mine one day.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Some type of second entrance/exit or escape tunnel should be incorporated now, before use.

If not possible, a mechanical track jack might do. You'd need at least one jack, and heavy pipe or timber to reach between the jack on the floor and the hatch. http://www.tksimplex.com/html/railroad_products.html

A bottle jack is another possibility, but it would need to be a high capacity one.

Either way, you'd need blocking stored to secure the overhead load in place as you make an exit through it.

If you can incorporate a hatch in the side of the shelter, even without an existing tunnel exit, you can keep excavation tools in the shelter an dig your way out using the hatch in the side of the shelter to gain access to the dirt.

For a cave, exlpore it (safely) to find an alternate exit. If there isn't one, arrangements should be made (excavation tools, jacks, timbers, etc) to extricate yoursef from inside the cave.

It is far better to have at least two ways out, separated by some distance, than hope to dig your way out. Though the means should be at hand to do so, even with an alternate exit.

If you don't want a visible escape point, create a tunnel from the shelter using culvert pipe or concrete drain pipe 30" or so in diameter. At the far end set a section on end that comes within a inches of the surface and extends down a couple of feet below the level of the tunnel. Rig a flap door in the vertical part of the exit and when the time comes, you can release the flap and let the dirt fall into the lower chamber, with the assistance of an e-tool if necessary.
Outstanding advice. Alongside the jack, wouldn't a thick metal pole be better than wood thanks to greater strength of the material?

But concerning the hatch in the side of the shelter, wouldn't such a hatch compromise the structural integrity of the shelter? Just think of it this way: Such a hatch would essentially leave part of one wall just made of dirt, and with only a little swinging door covering it. What would keep that dirt from collapsing in, or water from leaking in through the soil, or bugs/worms? This becomes a real problem when the shelter will probably need to last for years and years until...use.
 

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DIY RPG's
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heres what you do you say DOH like homer simson.

go out the vent shaft if its not to small or if you hapen to have a hammer and chisil or jack hammer
 

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I'm sorry. I wasn't very clear. The opening in the side of the shelter would be a heavy metal frame. The door would be reinforced steel. It would maintain the integrity of the shelter if done properly.

As far as the metal pole versus timber, which ever you have access to would work. I'm not talking about a 2x4. I was thinking of a 6x6 or 8x8 timber vs a 3" or 4" steel pipe.
 

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you could always hing the door on the bottom....like a draw bridge so to speak. It may be a beotch to close but opening it would be alot easier with gravity working with you.
 

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Have the door open in, use hydraulics as helpers to close it, like the helper hydraulics on a hatchback. You'll also have to beef up the lock. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm sorry. I wasn't very clear. The opening in the side of the shelter would be a heavy metal frame. The door would be reinforced steel. It would maintain the integrity of the shelter if done properly.

As far as the metal pole versus timber, which ever you have access to would work. I'm not talking about a 2x4. I was thinking of a 6x6 or 8x8 timber vs a 3" or 4" steel pipe.
Can you provide a picture of something resembling this door?
 

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Don't really have a picture at hand. This kind of hatch can be as simple as a circle of 3/8" to 1/2" steel plate with an X on the back of welded bar to strengthen it. Heavy metal gate post hinges would be bolted or welded to it and to the flange of the metal opening, with a sliding bolt on the other side to keep it closed against a simple rubber gasket.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Don't really have a picture at hand. This kind of hatch can be as simple as a circle of 3/8" to 1/2" steel plate with an X on the back of welded bar to strengthen it. Heavy metal gate post hinges would be bolted or welded to it and to the flange of the metal opening, with a sliding bolt on the other side to keep it closed against a simple rubber gasket.
Got it, thanks. My problem is solved.
 

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Ding... Thanks for playin
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Rule number one… TWO ways in and TWO ways out…

If not you can rig up a metal ram if you can weld that will push the opening with a long hydraulic ram. You will of coarse have to have some sort of bracing/locking area for the ram to mount to be stable as it pushes the opening.

This can be as elaborate as you want or as simple as a notch in the concrete floor to place the butt of the ram in.

You will want to make the actual contact to the opening to cover at least 75 percent of the opening. That way it will not just open one little corner or spot that will do no good to get through.

Make it or have it made and place the brace and ram in the shelter and forget about and hope you never have to use it…

Hope this helps
“Gunner” :thumb:
 
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