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Live Secret, Live Happy
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15,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Crisis Planning, Now that I Live at my BOL

I moved to southern California in 1983, with a shiny new engineering degree and a job offer from the US Navy. I worked for over 30 yrs at a Weapons Development base called China Lake, located in the Mohave Desert. I lived in a rural area, got paid real competitive wages, and my job was to design, build, and test Air Launched Weapons. But no matter how much I loved the job, I was still living in a desert, and that desert was still located in Dumb****istan.

So as soon as I reached the minimum retirement age, I punched out. I bought a small ranch in Eastern Oklahoma, sold my place in the desert, and moved. My new place is located in the western edge of the Ozark Mtns. I own 64 acres of trees and grass, with several natural springs, and a small creek. it rains an average of 44" per year, and it is very, very remote. I now live full time at what many folks would consider a perfect bug out location. So what could possible go wrong?

Gas Prices and Car Trouble. Living rural means driving every where, so even though I do not have to commute to work, some day I might have to walk home. A major concern is having to abandon a vehicle that has become Stuck, Broken, Run Out of Fuel, or Damaged by an EMP.

Normally, I would use my cell phone to call for help, but cell phones don't always work, so I might have to make a long walk home. I keep some items stored in each vehicle for this, including decent hiking boots, a hat, a warm jacket, water, a little food, and protection from Physical Attack. Which reminds me, one of the big advantages of move here is the ease of obtaining a handgun carry license.

Immediate Physical Danger. Some of the dangers that I worry about are Large Forest Fires, Floods, a Major Storm, or a Physical Attack by the local meth heads. These may seem unlikely, yet they happen to some unlucky person fairly often.

Bugging Out means to Evacuate Suddenly to Avoid Immediate Danger. It is intended to be a short term reaction to the situation, while the subject moves as quickly as possible home, or hides at a safer location. Since I live full time on a ranch, I have a lot more options, including controlling access, and reinforcing my house. But I also have a Light wt Nomad Pack, full of food and gear, stored away from the house.

Loosing the House. One of the worst things that might happen, would be to lose the house. While some immediate threats have the capacity to kill me, it is equally possible I will be forced to evacuate my home, and I can not return, or there is nothing left to return to.

Unlike a short term evacuation, a successful INCH plan needs to include a Prepositioned Cache at a safe location, Transportation to get there, a Light wt Pack with food, water, shelter, weapons, and supplies, and Tools and Documents needed to rebuild (construction and farming tools, documentation, cash, credit, and financial resources).

Loosing our Society. The greatest threat I plan for, is the complete breakdown of society, with the total loss of the electrical power grid, food and fuel deliveries, and the rule of law. My decision to retire early and buy a small ranch was influenced by this possibility. Once I get my place built up and producing most of my food and consumables, I have feel I have a fair chance of ridding out the loss of society.

Another response to the end of the world would be to live in a remote area until the craziness burns itself out. I adopted the term Extended Wilderness Living System (EWLS) to describe the system of gear and cached supplies I believe I would need to needed to live in a remote area for six years.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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15,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Get Home Gear, Maxpedition Sling Pack.
Wallet, Crawford Knife, Leatherman, LED Light, Keys, Cell Phone, Ruger GP 100, 357 Mag, 24 rds, Bianchi Holster,
Clothing/Shelter, Military Poncho, Poncho Liner, Vasque Boots. Camo Hunting Jacket.
Food, (2) MREs, Jerky, Chocolate, KFS,
Water, 2 L Hydration Bag, Filter Straw,
Misc Gear, Stanley Thermos, LED Flashlight, Belt Knife, Whet Stone, Head Net, Deet, Compass, Keys, Matches, (2) Bic Lighter, Striker, First Aid Kit w/ Tooth Brush, Nail Clippers, Sizzors, Mirror, Tinactin, Hydrocort, Deet, (Azor/Aspirin), Toilet Paper.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
Joined
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15,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Light wt Nomad Pack, Eureka Stalker Pack,
Wallet, Crawford Knife, Leatherman, LED Light, Keys, Cell Phone, Ruger GP 100, 357 Mag, 24 rds, Ruger Mini-30, 7.62x39, 100 rds.
Clothing, Mil BDUs, Duofold Henley, Dry Plus, Fleece Parka, Boots, Socks, Hat.
Shelter, Mil Bivy, Wiggy Summer Bags, Foam Pad, Bug Netting.
Food, (10) FD Entrees, 20# (Rice, Pasta, Bisquick, Potato Flakes, Corn Meal, Barley, Oats, Raisins, Beans, Dry Veggies), Alum Pot, MSR Stove, Fuel, Grill, Fishing Tackle, Gill Net, Trot Line, Bait, (6) SG Snares, (2) 1.5 coil, (2) Conibears.
Water, 6 L Water Bag, (2) 2 qt Canteens, Water Filter, Iodine Crystals,
Electronics, Pelican LED Flashlight, ICOM R-2 Radio, AA Batteries.
Misc Gear, First Aid Kit w/ Tooth Brush, Nail Clippers, Sizzors, Mirror, Tinactin, Hydrocort, Deet, (Azor/Aspirin), Whet Stone, Head Net, Deet, Compass, Keys, Buck Vanguard Knife, Nikon Binocs, Compass, Matches, (2) Bic Lighters, Butane Lighter, Striker, (2) Toilet Paper.
 

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Crisis Planning, Now that I Live at my BOL

I moved to southern California in 1983, with a shiny new engineering degree and a job offer from the US Navy. I worked for over 30 yrs at a Weapons Development base called China Lake, located in the Mohave Desert. I lived in a rural area, got paid real competitive wages, and my job was to design, build, and test Air Launched Weapons. But no matter how much I loved the job, I was still living in a desert, and that desert was still located in Dumb****istan.

So as soon as I reached the minimum retirement age, I punched out. I bought a small ranch in Eastern Oklahoma, sold my place in the desert, and moved. My new place is located in the western edge of the Ozark Mtns. I own 64 acres of trees and grass, with several natural springs, and a small creek. it rains an average of 44" per year, and it is very, very remote. I now live full time at what many folks would consider a perfect bug out location. So what could possible go wrong?

Gas Prices and Car Trouble. Living rural means driving every where, so even though I do not have to commute to work, some day I might have to walk home. A major concern is having to abandon a vehicle that has become Stuck, Broken, Run Out of Fuel, or Damaged by an EMP.

Normally, I would use my cell phone to call for help, but cell phones don't always work, so I might have to make a long walk home. I keep some items stored in each vehicle for this, including decent hiking boots, a hat, a warm jacket, water, a little food, and protection from Physical Attack. Which reminds me, one of the big advantages of move here is the ease of obtaining a handgun carry license.

Immediate Physical Danger. Some of the dangers that I worry about are Large Forest Fires, Floods, a Major Storm, or a Physical Attack by the local meth heads. These may seem unlikely, yet they happen to some unlucky person fairly often.

Bugging Out means to Evacuate Suddenly to Avoid Immediate Danger. It is intended to be a short term reaction to the situation, while the subject moves as quickly as possible home, or hides at a safer location. Since I live full time on a ranch, I have a lot more options, including controlling access, and reinforcing my house. But I also have a Light wt Nomad Pack, full of food and gear, stored away from the house.

Loosing the House. One of the worst things that might happen, would be to lose the house. While some immediate threats have the capacity to kill me, it is equally possible I will be forced to evacuate my home, and I can not return, or there is nothing left to return to.

Unlike a short term evacuation, a successful INCH plan needs to include a Prepositioned Cache at a safe location, Transportation to get there, a Light wt Pack with food, water, shelter, weapons, and supplies, and Tools and Documents needed to rebuild (construction and farming tools, documentation, cash, credit, and financial resources).

Loosing our Society. The greatest threat I plan for, is the complete breakdown of society, with the total loss of the electrical power grid, food and fuel deliveries, and the rule of law. My decision to retire early and buy a small ranch was influenced by this possibility. Once I get my place built up and producing most of my food and consumables, I have feel I have a fair chance of ridding out the loss of society.

Another response to the end of the world would be to live in a remote area until the craziness burns itself out. I adopted the term Extended Wilderness Living System (EWLS) to describe the system of gear and cached supplies I believe I would need to needed to live in a remote area for six years.
Congrats on your retirement and the setup you have. The only comment I would like to make at this time is it would seem, to me, that you need PEOPLE. That's a lot of land and home to try to defend, or even operate in times of peace, alone.
 

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Closed for the Season.
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With your 64 acres to live on, even if your house gets destroyed, you could have a backup place to live. Even if that is erecting a tent. Short term evacuations like for a Forrest fire (most fires in the Ozark are leaf fires unlike out West that are tree top fires) still can leave you a place to return if you have established protected areas. Lawns and fire breaks.

Having a vehicle breakdown when out getting supplies is more problematic and does happen. Cell phones are new fangled devices that are a big help but to those of us a bit older (like yourself) you probably dealt with that scenario in the past when cell phones did not exist. Rural motorists are likely to stop and ask if you need any assistance. Plus the advantage of not having any particular schedule takes the sting out of spending a day broke down having to repair your car. So what if 3-4 hours pass by?

ETA: One of the advantages of a laid back existence is to let go of having to be so immediate. Bit hard to adapt to not being a adrenalin junky or urban clock puncher but it has it's perks. Like time to change your mind on a project. Time to research. Time to say heck with it and go do something else. But now I have to head to town for my monthly supply run. I put it off for a week and now I am out of too many things. :(
 

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American fearmaker
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14,244 Posts
You are trying to think ahead of trouble and that is a very good thing. What that should mean, in your case, is that you could have to leave your paradise behind and bug out from there. If that should happen, do you have TWO other potential locations in mind where you might go to should you need to leave your home base?

Why two potential alternate bases? In case one of the bases is compromised. Special Forces taught the older troopers to always do things in threes. Split your supplies in groups of three, have 3 base camps and divide your people into 3 groups as well. By doing that the odds worked in your favor that more than likely you would not lose all 3 base camps or all 3 supply groups. Something for you to consider as well.

Also, older model vehicles are less subject to effects of an EMP or CME so you might want to think about either getting an older model vehicle or an old military vehicle that has been "hardened" against the effects of an EMP. Those vehicles are out there if you google them and know where to look. You can also have your present civilian vehicle hardened too if you are willing to pay for the service and know what you need done.

What have you got going for you as far as medical care? Some of those western/middle states area can be kind of barren as far as doctors and hospitals are concerned. I have a buddy who goes hunting in like North Dakota or Montana. He says that in some areas up there that you have to be real careful not to get hurt because the nearest hospital can be over 200 miles away.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Discussion Starter #11

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Nice setup, other than location and laws. Looks like you are definitely on the correct track.

To bad you live somewhere that is so restrictive that you need a license to carry.

That I am no longer nomadic, have not been for a couple years now, has been a concern for me, being anchored to a location of residence does not feel very safe.

Though if I have to bug, it will be INCH.
 

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Live Secret, Live Happy
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Discussion Starter #14
You might want to put a bike in the back of your vehicle in case you break down. My folks had one that folded up and fit in the trunk of the car
Agree. I found that I can ride my Giant brand FCR Hybrid bike on most of the terrain here. It is easy to ride with the 10 lb Sling pack and possible with the larger Nomad pack.

If I were forced to abandon the property, I want to recover and carry one of my food sustainment caches. I need to try loading the (4) heavy food bags on to my Giant bike and see if I can push it.
 

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Congrats on retiring while you are still in good shape.

A steel shipping container in an open area of your big property would give you something to come back to even in the event of a forest fire and is very secure.

In town, maybe a small rented storage shed could be used to stash a cache and a bike or a Rokon, copies of important papers and computer media, etc.
 

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off-grid organic farmer
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Way ahead of you buddy.
My gold watch is a new Mahindra 6530 with a front loader and backhoe.
I bought it the first month I was living here to help with the work.
I have a M/F deisel tractor with all the attachments [front loader, backhoe, disc harrow, snow blower, pallet forks, barrel lift, etc] among the best investments you can make :)
 

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New and yet, old
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Agree. I found that I can ride my Giant brand FCR Hybrid bike on most of the terrain here. It is easy to ride with the 10 lb Sling pack and possible with the larger Nomad pack.

If I were forced to abandon the property, I want to recover and carry one of my food sustainment caches. I need to try loading the (4) heavy food bags on to my Giant bike and see if I can push it.
Here's a tip on how to transport several hundred pounds on a bicycle. (Why yes i did serve in Vietnam)



The stick strapped across the handlebars gives you much better leverage (pro tip: run it out to equal lengths on both sides to allow you to switch sides) and the vertical one doubles your ability to steer
 

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Here's a tip on how to transport several hundred pounds on a bicycle. (Why yes i did serve in Vietnam)



The stick strapped across the handlebars gives you much better leverage (pro tip: run it out to equal lengths on both sides to allow you to switch sides) and the vertical one doubles your ability to steer
The real question is how much weight can be pushed up hill.
Everyone has a different answer.
 
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