Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
City Boy Without A Clue
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here’s my first task as a prepper. Any advice you have would be appreciated.

My wife and I sat down and made a simple list of events to prepare for. Here’s what we came up with:

Tornado
Shut-In: Short Term
Shut-In: Long Term
Bug-Out: With vehicles
But-Out: On foot
Prison Break (there’s a prison less than 2 miles from the house)

My wife’s eyes started to roll a little when I brought up the Prison Break idea. But God bless her, she’s humoring me and being totally supportive. So I have to remember to start slowly and keep it simple.

The most likely issue we’ll see in this area is a tornado. So we made a list of items to put in a tornado box. The idea being, if a tornado hits in the middle of the night and we make it to the basement with 5 small children in PJ’s and bare feet, then we have to climb out of the rubble.

The basement is too wet and funky to store anything so we plan to keep the box at the top of the stairs. We can grab it on the way down.

We’ll keep the winter boots in there so all the kids have boots that fit but won’t be used daily and left out away from the box. Some cheap ponchos, flashlight and candles, lighter, a whistle, a little food and water. I think that’s it, I don’t have the list in front of me right now.

Its all on paper, now we just have to do it.

Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Don't forget to include an am/fm/NOAA Weather radio, crowbar, and your cell phone in the tornado kit. Maybe a "go bag" with important documents, insurance information, and cash/credit cards to take with you downstairs. And, don't forget pets. Sounds like a good start though.

I would remove the candles from the tornado box. The last thing that you need during/after a tornado is a fire risk, especially if there is damage to gas lines.
 

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,776 Posts
Good start--you're thinking about it, which is the most important first step.

In prepping, water first--so make sure you have enough supply you can use for a couple days at least. I'd consider, for example, six bottles of water for each person as a minimum.

You could perhaps get a case of water, wrap it in a plastic garbage bag to seal it, and store that in your basement.
 

·
1209
Joined
·
7,504 Posts
Small children have small bladders, so their ability to wait is also small. You might consider keeping a plastic bucket, with everything needed to turn it into "camp toilet bucket" (a special seat that goes on buckets, liner bags with polymer powder and enzymes, some rolls of tissue) next to or on top of the box.

Mainstay or Datrex slabs, provided they don't contain anything someone is allergic to. They are lifeboat food, might get boring, but will add a great deal of time you can hold out if the house is rubble over the top of you, also good for if you have to leave home with frightened littles, if they get hungry in the car and drop crumbs, easier to clean up than pb&j sandwiches.

If you don't have first aid training, get the best you can, even if one parent has to get it first, and the other later. Get the kids in scouts or other worthwhile children's training as they get old enough for it, especially outdoor skills and first aid.
 

·
City Boy Without A Clue
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Ok, I'll keep an eye out at garage sales for a dirt-cheap saw and crowbar to include. Also an old buck knife and some work gloves. I found a self powered NOAA Radio/flashlight for $30 on Amazon. It gets good raitings. And I guess I'll fill the rest of the box with water bottles and Clif Bars.

The potty bucket is a good idea. I'm not sure if I should spend the resources on it right now. There is sooooooo much that I want to prepare for. But sure as sh** this could be useful. I think I'll add it to my shut-in plan and store it near the tornado box.

No one in the family has any special medical needs. Thankfully no meds needed. And I'm actually signed up for a CPR class next month. I love it when a plan comes together!

Thanks for the advice. Keep it comming. I'll put up another post when I actually put this stuff together.
 

·
A Round American Woman
Joined
·
539 Posts
An idea to go with your potty bucket is a couple of bales of cedar hamster shavings. You use the bucket and then layer with the cedar. The scent helps in small spaces for the eventual smell.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,104 Posts
You might want to add some warm clothing or a blanket (even if its a aluminium one) for each person.

Have a look at You Tube and see if there are any Tornadoe specific videos for preps.

Do drills as well, to make sure everyone knows what to do. Give the kids something to do once in the basement to keep them busy.

Dont forget any pets you have, so they need water, food, for cats and dogs extra collars/leash, medicines/treatments, bedding and so on.

Oh and dont forget some whistles.
 

·
democrats = Hydra
Joined
·
6,184 Posts
The potty bucket is a good idea. I'm not sure if I should spend the resources on it right now. There is sooooooo much that I want to prepare for. But sure as sh** this could be useful. I think I'll add it to my shut-in plan and store it near the tornado box.
QUOTE]

I put one together last fall, came in handy when my water pipes froze. I keep small trash bags for it; I can bag each and put in a smaller bucket or other container. (towellettes here!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
The other option for the potty bucket is having a bucket of kitty litter to layer in there also.... that will solidify and really get rid of odor......

As for medicines I would have each family member be responsible for their own medicines... in a bag next to the bed or they grab when trhey grab whatever else they grab
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
If your basement is wet and funky, do you have a roll of plastic to roll out to sit on? Maybe a deck of cards or a board game to help get their mind off what's happening. Travel versions of games are small and lightweight. A jar of peanut butter and crackers would be of comfort and maybe packets of drink like Capri sun. For kids, Datrex might be ok, but they might feel better with food they are used to.
What about installing a phone jack down there and taking an old time phone that doesn't need to be plugged in. Cell phone towers may be down but regular phones may still work. Or a GMRS two way radio so you can let someone know if you are trapped.
I'm guessing in Michigan that winter power outages and ice storms are pretty normal since they aren't on your list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Congratulations on seeing the light! I think a lot of new preppers try to do too much too soon and end up with substandard equipment and supplies trying to over think things. Instead of looking at scenarios and prepare for those, look at it like CPR instructors teach....A,B,C's. Airway, breathing, circulation. If you don't have an airway, the rest of it doesn't really matter.

Prepping is the same way. What do you absolutely need to survive? Then what is next, then next, etc.

Water is the most important, but along with shelter, they are a tie for first place. A good quality portable water filter is essential if you are away from your usual source. It is also nice to have some stored until you can find another source.

You need both, regardless of scenario. You also need to stay warm and dry, so what do you require for that? If you live in an area where you can quickly die of exposure, then consider your needs. Tent, tarps, warm sleeping bags, fire starters (very high on the list!), a good knife for cutting rope, limbs, cooking, etc. is essential.

Lighting for safety and mobility is important. A good quality head lantern that is waterproof is a great investment and may help you get where you are going or to use as signaling.

Food is definitely in the top 5, but it is not number 1. There is way too much already out there to address food storage, but start with what is readily available and work your way up to a year's supply. Star kist tuna in small cans or foil pouches, packaged crackers, hard candy, beef jerky, freezed dried camping meals, small jars of peanut butter, granola bars etc. can all be obtained quickly, require little or no prep and are cheap and portable. They will need to be rotated frequently, but are great to have in the car or BOB. A small cook set is nice for heating food and water as well. You can go as cheap as a Boy Scout set at the thrift store, or the high dollar titanium ones at REI.

A lot of folks put an emphasis on battle rifles, huge caliber firearms, etc. I think something you can shoot small game with is a good start. Check out the Ruger 10/22 take down rifle. It's a nice little tool.

If tornadoes or natural disasters are your focus right now, make sure everyone has sturdy shoes and rain gear readily available.

A decent first aid kit is probably next on my list. Include a variety of bandaids in sizes, ace wraps, absorbent bandages, wound cleaning supplies, steri strips or butterfly bandages, material for slings and splints, tylenol, ibuprofen and benadryl. The fancy stuff is great, but start with what you are most likely to need.

Of course you need to have a bag of some sort to store everything in. Keep that simple as well. The most important thing is to have everything in one place and not have to search through debris for your supplies.

This will get you through the initial stages of a bad time, but for the long haul of course there is so much more, but start small and educate yourself and your family. I think our biggest asset is our brain, so learn everything you can, and this forum is a great way to start.

Have a plan, but keep it flexible! Include the family in your planning so everyone is on the same page.

There is much to learn and you can take this as far as you are willing and can afford, but you are getting started, and that is the most important part! :D:
 

·
Still here...
Joined
·
1,153 Posts
I second the blanket for each child as well as a small "party bag" for each. It just needs to be a ziplock bag size. Include a new small stuffed animal (like beany-baby size), and some candy. The kids will need some comfort if there's a tornado.
 

·
1209
Joined
·
7,504 Posts
Including them in the plan is a must, but also have a drill two or three times a year, so everyone knows what to do. Everyone have a job, and if someone is ill or injured, they become an additional job for someone, while their job becomes someone else's additional task.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
If you're in MI, you might want to start planning for winter scenarios as well, snowstorm, electrical outages, alternative heat source. I know it's spring but winter comes pretty fast. Out East we've had power outages for several days the past two years. For each family member: warm sleeping bag, flashlight, long underwear. If you have an electric stove, a backup (we love our Coleman dual fuel camping stove). Battery operated (or gas) lanterns, candles, and matches/batteries. Stuff to insulate windows/doors. Easy to cook stuff, anything from extra peanut butter/bread to canned soup, soup mixes, etc. A generator and some extra fuel . . .

The grid is getting older and the population continues to grow. IMO, it's only getting worse and we can expect to see more outages, both in the summer when there are blackouts and brownouts and in the winter from storms.

I would also consider a small backpack for each child that s/he is responsible for getting in an emergency. It can contain things like a change of clothes, snacks, a bottle of water, a flashlight, their personal information, a small amount of money, a book, colors, stickers, matchbox car, etc. depending on their preference. You can have them change it out seasonally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
I would add in a fire evacuation plan. If the kids are old enough make sure they know how to dial 911 and give their address. All family members should also know age apropriate first aid.

Do you have any pets? If so, a plan for the pets is also important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
If a tornado is on path to your town and you are at home;fill everything up with water, this includes bathtub, sink and flushbox. Fill up every container that you have. This means even the kitchen sink. lol the clean water can save you and possibly your neighbors. Remember CATRINA? H ave plenty of batteries. You can't have too many!!!!!
 

·
PreparationInBubbaNation
Joined
·
2,503 Posts
If a tornado is on path to your town and you are at home;fill everything up with water, this includes bathtub, sink and flushbox. Fill up every container that you have. This means even the kitchen sink. lol the clean water can save you and possibly your neighbors. Remember CATRINA? H ave plenty of batteries. You can't have too many!!!!!
If you can tell that the tornado is on path, you won't have tie to do this and live.

You might do it however, if there was simply a tornado warning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
You've gotten some great info thus far I would like to add a couple senarios to prep for to your list. Job loss, you really should try to have a least 6 months of expenses save up for lack of income. Also consider car emergencies flat tires and breakdowns, and such. House fires is also another one. Simple things like making sure everyone has shoes next to their bed they can quickly grab, fire extinguishers, fire alarms in working condition and so on.

Flashlights next to beds also. One really important thing to remember is organization preps are useless if you have them but can't easily find them when you need them.

We practice with our grandkids simple things they might need to do during an emergency by making it a game. They have no idea to a certain extent that we're practicing for some of the more scary stuff.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top