Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if someone makes a dual night vision and thermal scope all in one? I thought I saw one at a gun show a few years ago. You could flip a switch to go from one to the other depending on circumstances.

What are the differences?

Is one better than the other?

Which one is the best bang for the buck?

Would be using it for both night hunting (legal for varmit, wild hogs) and SHTF.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
Look up fusion technology

NV can "see" through glass. Thermal cannot.
NV makes PID easier
NV allows the use of aiming lasers

Thermal allows you to see through fog and smoke

To hide from NVG requires the same thing it takes to hide from the human eye. To hide from thermal requires...more (if in the open)
 

·
Registered
Packed and Ready
Joined
·
301 Posts
I've done some reading on this and the previous post sums it up well. If you are looking to use it in conjunction with a weapons system NV is the better option for practical use.

If you are looking for something to use as a stationary device as part of an Observation Post it would be a good choice of 2 in one.

That's just my thoughts from reading up on the subject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ok, so some night hunters prefer thermal to see wild hogs or other varmits through grass and shrub. Makes sense. I've looked at the night vision/thermal You Tube videos and guy in a gillie suit could not be seen with night vision, but could with thermal behind some low hanging leaves.

Any suggestion on brands?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I too am trying decide on night vision (PVS-14 gen 3) vs a thermal scope. The ATN Thor looks promising as does FLIR products and a few others. Looking for any input and pros vs cons. TIA, All the best.
 

·
Semper Fi
Joined
·
8,975 Posts
Do the 3rd gen NV and get a cheap thermal to find guys hiding behind bushes. Neighbor has the $500 FLIR Scout and it works well enough to scan an area and pick out heat signatures.

That being said what kind of distances are you looking to have to use these at? Other than close up you need to step up in price quite a bit on thermal to be able to identify more than a red dot of heat. Is that heat blob a bad guy or your neighbor coming to help? A coyote or your dog?
 

·
Registered
Packed and Ready
Joined
·
301 Posts
Do the 3rd gen NV and get a cheap thermal to find guys hiding behind bushes. Neighbor has the $500 FLIR Scout and it works well enough to scan an area and pick out heat signatures.

That being said what kind of distances are you looking to have to use these at? Other than close up you need to step up in price quite a bit on thermal to be able to identify more than a red dot of heat. Is that heat blob a bad guy or your neighbor coming to help? A coyote or your dog?
I would hope that operating through thermal would be similar to hunting rules. Don't shoot until you can identify your target. Human bodies of the same size can't really be determined individually with a thermal. At least with the ones I have used. (No I don't remember the make and model of those.)
 

·
Semper Fi
Joined
·
8,975 Posts
I would hope that operating through thermal would be similar to hunting rules. Don't shoot until you can identify your target. Human bodies of the same size can't really be determined individually with a thermal. At least with the ones I have used. (No I don't remember the make and model of those.)
A good thermal $$$$ lets you recognize peoples features in "white= hot" mode. Ones I used in Marines were excellent. Even my friend's cheap $500 FLIR Scout works for that up close.

Switching to "red=hot" allows for easier detection but much lower resolution.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top