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democrats = Hydra
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http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2014/05...spect/?cmpid=edpick&google_editors_picks=true


***Seeking reliable backup communication in a crisis, emergency managers are finding new solutions in an old technology: ham radio.

“It’s just another avenue, another opportunity for us to be able to communicate,” said Herb Schraufnagel, public safety captain with Emory University Hospital Midtown.

Emory HealthCare is among a growing number of hospital systems to adopt ham radio. Hospital administrators and government officials took a lesson from Hurricane Katrina, which left some Gulf Coast medical centers isolated from the outside world, as landlines and cell towers failed.

When power, phone and Internet services go down, a battery-powered amateur radio and portable antenna can provide that crucial link to the outside world.***

welcome to the club, media.

it can only be a good thing for hospitals and 911 centers, etc, to have their own ham operations.
 

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Ham Extra Class
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Our hospitals in the area use the nchears network to stay connected.

http://www.nchears.org/

It connects all the ham operators and hospitals in and around NC and VA should a crisis arise.
It also makes for a great way to communicate to friends and family members that are hams when we travel in the linked repeaters coverage area. (Its open to all licensed ham operators).
An example of its use would be if a certain blood type was needed during a crisis the network could help find donors and also relay the blood on hand at all the participating hospitals.



Here are all the linked repeaters that stay linked most all the time.
 

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It's not just hospitals that are recognizing the need. I have several friends that work in the Tulsa Public School system in various capacities, and last year one of them was asking me about becoming a ham. It seems the schools have decided that it's a good idea to have some licensed radio amateurs on hand.
 

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Ironic that the best backup (and even primary) systems are based upon technology 1/2century old.

What I don't understand is why Hammers are stigmatized by much of media. Off course there is no money to be made in advertising on HAM bands (it is illegal) so just increase the hate???
 

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Prepared
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"old" technology. It's funny that the corporate media continually likes to frame ham radio as obsolete. We live in an era of more wifi and radio-controlled devices than ever before. Ham radio digital modes, satellite, voip, echolink, aprs, eme, cubesats, etc. are not only leading-edge, but you can actually tinker with them (if you have your license). I'm afraid this article keeps the old meme going: ham radio is "old".

Someone needs to konk these journalists on the head. The only thing "old" is that it is non-commercial and the bands are free to licensed operators. They are owned by virtue of being a (licensed) US citizen. Imagine that -- you don't need to pay RENT for those bands. I think even ol' Ross Perot has commented on this.
 

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All South Carolina hospitals have a Palmetto 800 mhz radio in their comm centers for emergency communications relating to patient transfers from hurricane/earthquake ravaged areas. That said, the SCHearts 2m/440 statewide linked repeater system is the Pal 800 backup with HF comms the next backup. The reason for ham radio is not the lack of robustness of the Pal 800, but the potention for running out of channel availability due to the sheer number of agencies depending on it.

RS
 

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"old" technology. It's funny that the corporate media continually likes to frame ham radio as obsolete. We live in an era of more wifi and radio-controlled devices than ever before. Ham radio digital modes, satellite, voip, echolink, aprs, eme, cubesats, etc. are not only leading-edge, but you can actually tinker with them (if you have your license). I'm afraid this article keeps the old meme going: ham radio is "old".

Someone needs to konk these journalists on the head. The only thing "old" is that it is non-commercial and the bands are free to licensed operators. They are owned by virtue of being a (licensed) US citizen. Imagine that -- you don't need to pay RENT for those bands. I think even ol' Ross Perot has commented on this.
You said it. Ham radio is not antiquated: nothing could be further from the truth. Radio tx/rx is more relevant now than ever. Modern ham radios are tremendously powerful and sophisticated. We can talk to the ISS, to satellites, we can bounce signals off the damned moon.

And with ham radio privileges you can take a linksys router, put a high gain antenna and a RF amplifier on it and run a wireless router for miles ;)
 
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