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So close to 9/11, I think there was a lot of good will still left in NYC. Now days though - after the politicians have deepened the divide between us and completely disarmed the law abiding even further - well, I believe there would be a lot more violence and looting.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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Thanks for the OP posting.

It's good to recall how things went down previously, particularly if there are any lessons learned you can put to good use today.
 

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Wile E Coyote, Genius.
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Thanks for the OP posting.

It's good to recall how things went down previously, particularly if there are any lessons learned you can put to good use today.
One big lesson was that the people in NYC tall buildings really had a problem with public bathrooms that require electricity to turn on the dang water. Horrific sanitation problems arose. I think they switched them to battery power after this.
 

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my 2 cents

One of the things that stood out in the pictures is all the people on the bridges trying to get out of the city. I don't remember how long the black out lasted but I just can't imagine how hard it would be to get out of the city and try to get home especially if home might be 20 to 50 miles away. Can you imagine what it would be like in an emp, solar flare, grid hacker, or terrorist attack. Sure glad I don't live in any city.
 

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Bad Moon Rising
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One of the things that stood out in the pictures is all the people on the bridges trying to get out of the city. I don't remember how long the black out lasted but I just can't imagine how hard it would be to get out of the city and try to get home especially if home might be 20 to 50 miles away. Can you imagine what it would be like in an emp, solar flare, grid hacker, or terrorist attack. Sure glad I don't live in any city.
The same sort of photos exist from Washington DC after the plane flew into the Pentagon on 9-11-01. In the confusion afterwards, public transportation was not available. People streamed out of Washington DC on foot over the various bridges. There were not enough cabs, and in any event the traffic gridlock was legend. Many drivers of public transportation did not show up, out of concern that a larger attack was underway.

As we also saw with Hurricane Katrina, one of the first things to go down after a crisis event is public transportation - buses, subways, cabs, etc. Getting transportation from Point A to Point B becomes a huge issue for hundreds if not thousands of people.

It's a long walk home....no matter where home is.
 

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Welcome to the rice field
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Not a riot or a loot in the series I noticed, but the official report was that there were only 250 blackout related arrests made. Huge difference from the previous blackout in 77?
It was surprisingly peaceful. People thought it was a terrorist attack. It was also very short lived. As I said, given enough time things would unravel. That's not an insult to NY residents specifically... it's just human nature. Emergencies can initially unite people. Inspire compassion and heroism. However, the longer they endure the less benevolent people are.

Crime spiked following hurricane sandy. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/11/0...o-bring-out-worst-in-public-along-east-coast/

We all know what happened after Katrina.
 

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The story is on a blackout that affected several states, plus some areas of Canada. All of the photos are from NYC. I guess people outside of NYC must be so used to living in primitive conditions that it wasn't much of a hardship.
 

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VA / NC
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The story is on a blackout that affected several states, plus some areas of Canada. All of the photos are from NYC. I guess people outside of NYC must be so used to living in primitive conditions that it wasn't much of a hardship.
Just like Katrina. One would have thought it only hit New Orleans, but then again most of the attention was given to New Orleans because the folks along the Mississippi Coast and remainder of Louisiana opted to get on with life and take care of themselves.
 

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I was working out of the country at the time and my then wife commuted from CT to Manhattan.

I was worried out of my mind for a few hours, but all turned out well.

Initially, she and her coworkers had the presence of mind to book a nearby hotel room. That would have worked great, but apparently the hotel had to close soon after because ordinances forbade having guests when you can't provide electricity.

Eventually, Metro North brought in their diesel engines and everyone could slowly trickle out of the city.

I believe that she eventually got home around midnight, so it could have been worse.

The next day, I was online and had a small, inverter Yamaha generator shipped home. But like so many folks here, we lived in a high rise apartment building. I don't know what good it would have done us but she couldn't say that I didn't look out for her ;)
 

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Dumpster Diver
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Discussion Starter #19
Just like Katrina. One would have thought it only hit New Orleans, but then again most of the attention was given to New Orleans because the folks along the Mississippi Coast and remainder of Louisiana opted to get on with life and take care of themselves.
not entirely true,,not saying they are not brave and resourceful, but few people can recover from that level of SHTF without outside help... no matter the bravado and strutting by some of our members here on the forum and their fantasies of being lone survivors in the boondocks

guys from here went down to Mississippi and rural Louisiana to render aid, EMTs and Paramedics particularly were sent into remote areas otherwise neglected by FEMA etc , often hiking in miles of impassable roads with backpacks with 3 days of personal food etc. and medical supplies..for the people, getting picked up at a rendezvous by vehicle or airlift later and redeployed to another locale.

My FD and the FD in the next town , each drove a fire engine down, ours to Mississippi and theirs to a rural coast town in LA.. and donated them

I belong to a group that collects musical instruments and takes them (still to this day years later ) down to the rural areas for the kids in hopes of helping them continue to enrich America with a new generation of musicians
The guys also put on musical shows to brighten their lives,, many of which have not fully recovered yet from the damage of the hurricane












this is a pic of me (blue shirt) presenting my friend Bill Hudson (yes, Kates dad) with my own accordian to find its way to some young person down there

Bill left from our meeting to go repair Pete Seegers screen door,,before returning to his home near my brother in Va, and starting off on the trip to Miss & LA


and here is a bunch of photos showing the group accepting instruments here and entertaining the kids down there, and donating instruments and such

https://www.facebook.com/TheFeelGoodTour
 

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There are areas of New York clearly posted by city government. Warning signs that inform one that they are on their own after crossing into inner city zones. Places where if you get into trouble, police WILL NOT come in there to help you.

Guns are outlawed there but only criminals can have serious fire power.
 
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