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Guardian of Liberty
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Downloads: A new file has been added by cupid0311:

Saving your own vegetable seeds

Good seeds are undoubtedly one of the most important materials for farmers. The seeds must be healthy and, preferably, they must possess all the desirable properties that farmers need such as high yielding, high quality, and resistances to diseases, insect pests and environmental stresses.

Leave a thank, post your opinion, anything just let me know if you find this useful.
 

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Hi, thanks for the thread.
I am really interested in non-GMO seeds, and heirloom seeds. I don't like what Monsanto has done to the corn. Any suggestions on where I can purchase bulk non-GMO corn?
Thanks
 

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Purple potatos and other types, non-GMO.

I would like to find non-GMO non treated, seed potatos. Especially the purple potato,the highest in anti-oxidants. Also, any rose type potatos and fingerlings. I live in So. California, so I will have to order I don't know of anyone selling bulk in this area. Any suggestions or websites would be helpful.

Also, I want to try growing in bags, like the big potato bags. Does anyone have experience, tips?

Thanks

:thumb:
 

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just surviving
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Buy organic potatoes and sprout from cuttings. (The Monsanto type companies are trying to get the law changed so that USDA Organic can include GMO but last I heard it hasn't been changed yet.)

Heirloom corn doesn't produce as well as the hybridized stuff but it will grow and produce viable seed. Worms of course can be a problem. I got mine locally so can't help you with supplier but there are quite a few online.
 

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i agree ,,saving seeds isnt that tough for some crops ,,,beans,,,peas,,,corn ,,,squash,,,tomatoes cuccumbers are all fairly easy ,,,its the ones that take 2 years to make seed that are tougher
like beets,,,turnips ,,,carrots
 

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I don't know how true this is but several years ago heard that a lot of plants you buy from nurseries have altered seeds in them in that if you keep the seeds from what you produce they wil either not grow or have very little yield. Has anyone else heard this?
 

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old hand
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Hi, thanks for the thread.
I am really interested in non-GMO seeds, and heirloom seeds. I don't like what Monsanto has done to the corn. Any suggestions on where I can purchase bulk non-GMO corn?
Thanks
Bulk seed corn is sold in 2500 lb units, are you looking for that much?
... otherwise, a small bag (35 - 55 lbs) contains 80,000 seeds.

Any seed corn dealer can hook you up with non-GMO corn seed.

I don't know how true this is but several years ago heard that a lot of plants you buy from nurseries have altered seeds in them in that if you keep the seeds from what you produce they wil either not grow or have very little yield. Has anyone else heard this?
Nurseries that did that to their customers would go out of business in short order, don't you think?
 

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Nurseries that did that to their customers would go out of business in short order, don't you think?
I think they are referring to spliced cuttings of things like apples. The seeds from the fruit the purchased tree bears might not have a strong root structure, hence them splicing them to begin with.

That's why a lot of the seeds from fruit you buy in the store tend not to grow very well. Or so I've read.
 

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I think they are referring to spliced cuttings of things like apples. The seeds from the fruit the purchased tree bears might not have a strong root structure, hence them splicing them to begin with.

That's why a lot of the seeds from fruit you buy in the store tend not to grow very well. Or so I've read.
Most fruit trees (particularly from the Family Rosaceae) are grafted cuttings of a breed that produces desirable fruit, on root-stock which is disease resistant and is usually also a dwarf breed. If for some reason the top of the plant dies, and the root-stock grows up (happens with suckers too) you end up with undesirable fruit, like crabapples.

Another problem, most of the desirable fruit like you find in a grocery store, such as a Honeycrisp apple, are heterozygotes, so seed from them will produce all kinds of different apples. Some of the seedlings will produce good or OK fruit, but most of them will be crabapples. That is why most fruit trees you find in a nursery are cuttings grafted onto ?? (sadly, most nurseries can't even tell you what they're grafted onto because they never bother to ask their supplier).
 

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Stargazer Extraordinaire
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Most fruit trees (particularly from the Family Rosaceae) are grafted cuttings of a breed that produces desirable fruit, on root-stock which is disease resistant and is usually also a dwarf breed. If for some reason the top of the plant dies, and the root-stock grows up (happens with suckers too) you end up with undesirable fruit, like crabapples.

Another problem, most of the desirable fruit like you find in a grocery store, such as a Honeycrisp apple, are heterozygotes, so seed from them will produce all kinds of different apples. Some of the seedlings will produce good or OK fruit, but most of them will be crabapples. That is why most fruit trees you find in a nursery are cuttings grafted onto ?? (sadly, most nurseries can't even tell you what they're grafted onto because they never bother to ask their supplier).
This is why it's so important to keep the water sprouts cut back when they sprout. Besides taking valuable resources from the viable part of the plant these non-producing shoots can overwhelm the plant and before long you can't tell what was the grafted part. I try to go out once a week to remove the water sprouts from my orchard.

Rick
 

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I saved seeds from everything I grew this year. I started by looking for heirloom varieties so the seeds would be true breeding. I've also saved a couple of seed potatoes from farmer's market buys, including two varieties of the beloved blues. I washed the seeds then let them dry as completely as possible. They're stored in marked #10 envelopes inside of the metal boxes I get from Swiss Colony every year. I've also purchased some heirloom & organic varieties on Amazon. I do have a survival seed vault but that's kind of a last resort thing. I'm not sure all of the varieties will grow in my environment. The things that grew well here last year, will likely do so next year.

Keeping my fingers crossed-
 
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