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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
CFP-90 Setup

Outside Center-

USGI M67 Buttpack with food

USGI NBC Bag with Cold Weather/Rain/Snow Gear


Long Pouch-

2 man tent (rolls up really nicely and fits in the pouch. My poncho/zeltbahn kit are under my buttpack with my survival buttpack)


Top Side Pouch-

Poncho (i carry 2. One in my ruck, one on my zeltbahn on my buttpack. One for myself one for my gear [learned that from my recruiter])

Free Harbor Freight blue light

Solar radio/power bank


Bottom Side Pouch-

Sawyer gallon filter kit with purification tabs


Top Flap-

Shemagh

USGI M81 Boonie Hat

Propper 6 Color Desert Boonie Hat

USGI ABU Patrol Cap and Boonie

Shoe Shine Kit

Foot powder/Blister kit

Weapon cleaning kit and wet stone

Documents/Maps


Main Compartment-

USGI Large Wet Weather Bag

USGI ABU Blouse and Trousers

USGI 6 Color Desert Blouse and Trousers

USGI M81 Blouse and Trousers

Set of civilian clothes

3 undershirts

6 pairs of socks

6 pairs of underwear

General bag of personal items

100 mph tape

3L water bladder

Sleeping pad


Radio Pouch-

MREs


Sleep System Carrier-

USGI Sleep System

Hygiene kit


Patrol Pack-

Main pocket:
Set of USGI ABUs (i got a lot of them)

Set of socks

Set of underwear

Front pocket:

2 1 qt canteens

Compact hammock (fits so nicely with room to spare)
2 Mountain House bags

Headlamp

Right side:

2 qt canteen with p38 can opener and water purification tabs

Left side:

E tool and case


Ruck Belt-

Mag pouch

General purpose pouch


i went off of this photo for a general reference, i know its a MOLLE II ruck and i have a CFP-90
372871
 

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I would dump a few uniforms for a pair of spare boots (had a heel come off a boot once, so glad I had a spare pair!). Also no food? IFAK? I love the CFP 90 pack! I have two!
 

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It's like you ignored all the advice given in your other packing list thread...

Still carrying about 200% too much crap. Including five sets of spare clothing (4 camouflage uniform sets/hats plus a set of civilian clothes).

Saddle up with all that stuff and move out smartly on a 12 miler at a 15 minute per mile pace. A light bulb will go off in your head somewhere along that line of march.

I know that you are very young. That you have little practical experience at this endeavor. That you are enthralled with military surplus you already own (I was too once upon a time). But... your packing list is still incredibly excessive. For both recreational hiking and for SHTF.

You are in love with your kit and it shows. I'm certain you have a reasoned justification for every bit of it. But you simply have waay too much. Here's a good technique for slaying that excess load weight conundrum:

Dump everything on the floor. Every single item, no matter how small or lightweight (including all exterior attachable pouches and internal "kit" organizers).

Critically analyze each item and toss into one of three piles:

1. Critical: I'll die, become injured/sick, or be physically unable to continue forward movement without this widget. Basics like food/water, minimum weather protection, minimal navigation aids, primary cutting edge, a minor first aid/blister kit, lighter/tinder, headlamp, a change of socks, water purification means, or means of self defense go into this pile.

2. Nice to Have: Reasonable possibility for contingency use, but not critical. Things like cookware, multiple days worth of excess rations, extra hygiene items, repair kits, backup items, overkill weather protection, spare clothing, redundancies, umpteen types of cordage, emergency foraging/hunting gear, or rarely used tools go here. There might be a perfectly justifiable use for an item, but your train won't go off the tracks without it.

3. Not Critical: At the end of the day, if you don't have this item... it really doesn't matter. You'll still almost certainly complete your hike. Contingency stuff that you've never used & aren't likely to ever use. This is where Good Idea Fairy items go to die.

Put just the critical pile items back into the pack, re-weigh the load, then try it on for fit and comfort. At that point, if you truly feel a remaining margin for more weight, you can choose something from the Nice to Have Pile.

Be ruthless. Conduct a "job interview" for each item. Only hire the ones that will get the job done.

-----------------

Fight 2 OCD tendencies:

1. Over-organizing everything by means of multiple "modules", containers, add-on pouches, sacks, bags, detachable mini-packs, and "kits".
Food, stove, and medical kits being the main exceptions. All those separate containers (and their integral straps, sewn webbing, buckles, snaps, etc.) add up to ounces & pounds of dead weight.

2. Drifting into a pattern of excessive redundancy for everything. Usually caused by "What If?" syndrome. If you have a tent and a bivy sack... you don't really need two ponchos. When one would suffice for in-extremis (I lost the tent) emergency use.

P.S. - I'm a retired US Army Special Forces Sergeant Major. Former Airborne Ranger Infantryman in a Ranger Battalion. A lifetime of packing rucks like yours and walking under them (if that means anything to you). In any event, I assure you that I'm talking from experience, not theory. I wouldn't steer you wrong... and I'm trying to give you some useful free advice. The same way I once did for my newly assigned youngest guys.
 

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How to pack a ruck like the infantry and they forget the 3 packs of Marlboros, log of Grizzly Wintergreen and bag of sunflower seeds? Rookies.

I would drop the shoe shine kit, and 2 of the 4 sets of cammies. Too much weight and they'll likely go unused. Stove for the mountain house? And one other thing I always found to be super useful was 100 feet of paracord.
 

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Listen to Astronomy. I carried all of that crap day one when I got to my unit.....Second time out I had nothing...just a blanket to "Show" that the ruck was full.....my buds didn't narc me out..Good dudes, and I didn't narc them out...When I got out I figured I needed a BOB..kinda thing...didn't call it that then...Funny......every year...more like every day out.......70 becomes 60-50-45-30 pounds-oh sweet Jeebus that shizz is heavy thank god I have a truck.......Start with a weapon, a reload, and an MRE or a couple cans of Ravioli..work on up from there.....Humpin sucks...I'd say try it sometime, but it really sucks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would dump a few uniforms for a pair of spare boots (had a heel come off a boot once, so glad I had a spare pair!). Also no food? IFAK? I love the CFP 90 pack! I have two!
theres food in there. the mres and moutain house plus i have a food bag. the ifak is on my buttpack. and yeah its a nice pack, im gonna mount mine to an exo again since i found it to be more comfortable
 

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im gonna mount mine to an exo again since i found it to be more comfortable
I was issued that pack once upon a time. I can't begin to think of how you could effectively mount an internal framed CFP-90 w/ ladder torsion adjustment connected to its shoulder straps...onto an external frame.

373001
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's like you ignored all the advice given in your other packing list thread...

Still carrying about 200% too much crap. Including five sets of spare clothing (4 camouflage uniform sets/hats plus a set of civilian clothes).

Saddle up with all that stuff and move out smartly on a 12 miler at a 15 minute per mile pace. A light bulb will go off in your head somewhere along that line of march.

I know that you are very young. That you have little practical experience at this endeavor. That you are enthralled with military surplus you already own (I was too once upon a time). But... your packing list is still incredibly excessive. For both recreational hiking and for SHTF.

You are in love with your kit and it shows. I'm certain you have a reasoned justification for every bit of it. But you simply have waay too much. Here's a good technique for slaying that excess load weight conundrum:

Dump everything on the floor. Every single item, no matter how small or lightweight.

Critically analyze each item and toss into one of three piles:

1. Critical: I'll die, become injured/sick, or be physically unable to continue forward movement without this widget. Basics like food/water, minimum weather protection, minimal navigation aids, primary cutting edge, a minor first aid/blister kit, lighter/tinder, headlamp, a change of socks, water purification means, or means of self defense go into this pile.

2. Nice to Have: Reasonable possibility for contingency use, but not critical. Things like cookware, multiple days worth of excess rations, extra hygiene items, repair kits, backup items, overkill weather protection, spare clothing, redundancies, umpteen types of cordage, foraging/hunting gear, or rarely used tools go here. There might be a perfectly justifiable use for an item, but your train won't go off the tracks without it.

3. Not Critical: At the end of the day, if you don't have this item... it really doesn't matter. You'll still almost certainly complete your hike. Contingency stuff that you've never used & aren't likely to ever use. This is where Good Idea Fairy items go to die.

Put just the critical pile items back into the pack, re-weigh the load, then try it on for fit and comfort. At that point, if you truly feel a remaining margin for more weight, you can choose something from the Nice to Have Pile.

Be ruthless. Conduct a "job interview" for each item. Only hire the ones that will get the job done.

-----------------

Fight 2 OCD tendencies:

1. Over-organizing everything by means of multiple "modules", containers, add-on pouches, sacks, bags, detachable mini-packs, and "kits".
Food, stove, and medical kits being the main exceptions. All those separate containers (and their integral straps, sewn webbing, buckles, snaps, etc.) add up to ounces & pounds of dead weight.

2. Drifting into a pattern of excessive redundancy for everything. Usually caused by "What If?" syndrome. If you have a tent and a bivy sack... you don't really need two ponchos. When one would suffice for in-extremis (I lost the tent) emergency use.

P.S. - I'm a retired US Army Special Forces Sergeant Major. Former Airborne Ranger Infantryman in a Ranger Battalion. A lifetime of packing rucks like yours and walking under them (if that means anything to you). In any event, I assure you that I'm talking from experience, not theory. I wouldn't steer you wrong... and I'm trying to give you some useful free advice. The same way I once did for my newly assigned youngest guys.
I see I see. thank you for the further breakdown. I'm sorry, I didn't understand the first time and didn't refer back to the old post. tonight I shall dump everything out and reevaluate my decisions. is it ok to message you if I have any questions?

also, that's really cool. thank you for your service and thank you for the advice as well. ill pay attention more, take notes, and refer back to older posts next time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was issued that pack once upon a time. I can't begin to think of how you could effectively mount an internal framed CFP-90 w/ ladder torsion adjustment connected to its shoulder straps...onto an external frame.

View attachment 373001
take off the straps and belt and feed the metal bars thru the frame. i did that with an alice pack frame and i think for my next one im gonna do a hunting pack frame since theyre built pretty stronger. but once you get it on the external, you can mount whatever straps and belts you desire. tbh when i ran it on the alice pack, it was quite nice but it could be better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How to pack a ruck like the infantry and they forget the 3 packs of Marlboros, log of Grizzly Wintergreen and bag of sunflower seeds? Rookies.

I would drop the shoe shine kit, and 2 of the 4 sets of cammies. Too much weight and they'll likely go unused. Stove for the mountain house? And one other thing I always found to be super useful was 100 feet of paracord.
lol not there yet. not yet

yeah i was thinking the same thing. i have a store in my buttpack. its a canteen stove but it works well for heating up water and then pouring it into the mountain house. i have 100 ft in my buttpack as well
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Listen to Astronomy. I carried all of that crap day one when I got to my unit.....Second time out I had nothing...just a blanket to "Show" that the ruck was full.....my buds didn't narc me out..Good dudes, and I didn't narc them out...When I got out I figured I needed a BOB..kinda thing...didn't call it that then...Funny......every year...more like every day out.......70 becomes 60-50-45-30 pounds-oh sweet Jeebus that shizz is heavy thank god I have a truck.......Start with a weapon, a reload, and an MRE or a couple cans of Ravioli..work on up from there.....Humpin sucks...I'd say try it sometime, but it really sucks
interesting. yeah trucks are handy, i got a 95 range and a 96 zj im building.

and thats my lbv setup right there. yeah i do every now n then when i can but once i get my license im gonna do it more
 

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This is a good thread. Thanks for posting haddad.10 and thanks for the comments, Astronomy. I suffer from redundancy thinking. Two is one. Except when you have to hump them 15 clicks overnight. Then one is better. Pounds are pain.
 
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