Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i know a few people who although would like the insurance of long term food (up to 30-40 years), they believe it would be far too expensive..

I need to put together a list detailing what an average adult would need to store in the short term (per year) for example what to store for the first 3 years, then what they can store for indemediate lengths 5- 10 years.. then anything that will last to 40ish years..

when it becomes nonviable to store all your vitimin needs, etc i need to specify that they will need to forrage/ garden to meet those needs..

any help with this would be greatly appreciated, as well as helping me it would also encourage a few people i know to varying degrees..

it doesnt have to be interesting.. basic grains, beans, dehydrated vegetables etc...anything that would keep sombody alive and healthy... more interesting foods can be worked out later... but i am looking for CHEAP

thank you very much
 

·
Time to hit reset
Joined
·
25,656 Posts
I've known about the Foxfire book series for some time now. And I'm just starting to get more info and start purchasing them. Back to the basics info, doing things like your grandma and great grandma did it. In case of a meltdown, the old ways are good to know.

Here's a link on some of the books available:
http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&ke...x=aps&hvadid=2450075395&ref=pd_sl_d0f79nnnp_e

Better yet, I think I'm going to do this on the cheap, and use the local library :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
when it becomes nonviable to store all your vitimin needs, etc i need to specify that they will need to forrage/ garden to meet those needs..
I would specify right from the get-go that they learn to garden and forage. heck, even better than getting canned vegetables would be to learn how to grow and store their own (can, dehydrate, etc)
 

·
Founder
Joined
·
16,867 Posts
i know a few people who although would like the insurance of long term food (up to 30-40 years), they believe it would be far too expensive..

I need to put together a list detailing what an average adult would need to store in the short term (per year) for example what to store for the first 3 years, then what they can store for indemediate lengths 5- 10 years.. then anything that will last to 40ish years..
The only long term food solution is gardening.

LOOONNNNGGGGGG term food storage is a myth. Plant a garden in the back yard and start stock piling seeds.
 

·
Prepping = life insurance
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
If you're planning on storing food for 40 years, you better learn how to live off the land and farm it.

Or move to some place warm where you can pull bananas off trees and fish out of the ocean? :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
These are conservative figures IMO. Some tests show double the numbers and better. 230gr

STORAGE LIFE NOTES ABOUT SPECIFIC FOODS
The Soft Grains
 Barley
 Hulled or Pearled Oat
 Groats
 Rolled Oats
 Quinoa
 Rye
Soft Grains have softer outer shells which don't protect the seed interior as well as hard shelled seeds and therefore won't store as long. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 8 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
The Hard Grains
BuckwheatCorn, DryFlaxKamut MilletDurum wheatHard red wheatHard white wheat Soft wheatSpecial bake wheatSpeltTriticale
The Hard Grains all store well because of their hard outer shell which is nature's near perfect container. Remove that container and the contents rapidly deteriorate. Wheat, probably nature's longest storing seed, has been known to be edible after scores of years when stored in a cool dry place. As a general rule for hard grains, hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 10-12 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Beans
Adzuki BeansBlackeye BeansBlack Turtle BeansGarbanzo Beans Great Northern KidneyBeansLentilsLima BeansMung Beans Pink BeansPinto BeansSmall Red BeansSoy Beans
As beans age they lose their oils, resist water absorption and won't swell. Worst case, they must be ground to be used. Storing beans in nitrogen helps prolong the loss of these oils as does cool temperatures. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Dehydrated Vegetables
 Broccoli Cabbage Carrots CeleryOnions PeppersPotatoes
Dehydrated vegetables store well if hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen. Plan on a storage life of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Dehydrated Dairy Products
CheesePowderCocoa PowderPowder EggsButter/margarine Powder Powder MilkMorning Moo Whey Powder
Dehydrated dairy products generally store very well if stored dry in hermetically sealed containers. Plan on a storage life of 15 years if stored at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures. One exception is Morning Moo. As a new whey based product, it hasn't been tested for long term storage. Plan on rotating this product after 5 years.
Flours and Other Products Made From Cracked/Ground Seed
All Purpose FlourBakers FlourUnbleached FlourWhite Flour Whole Wheat FlourCornmeal MixesRefried Beans Cracked WheatGermade GlutenGranola Wheat Flakes
After seeds are broken open their outer shells can no longer protect the seed contents and seed nutrients start to degrade. Don't try to store unprotected flours longer than a year. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 5 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Pasta
PastaMacaroniNoodles RibbonsSpaghetti
Pasta will store longer than flour if kept dry. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 8 - 10 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. Pasta should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Dehydrated Fruit
Fruit doesn't keep as well as many dehydrated items. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 5 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Honey, Salt and Sugar
Honey, salt and sugar should keep indefinitely if stored free of moisture. Watch out for additives in the honey. It is possible to buy honey with water and sugar added. This honey generally doesn't crystallize like pure 100% honey does when stored for a long time. If there are additives, there is no saying how long it will last.
Peanut Butter Powder
Peanut butter powder will not store as long as wheat flour. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 4-5 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. It should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Brown and White Rices
Brown and white rices store very differently. Brown rice is only expected to store for 6 months under average conditions. This is because of the essential fatty acids in brown rice. These oils quickly go rancid as they oxidize. It will store much longer if refrigerated. White rice has the outer shell removed along with those fats. Because of this, white rice isn't nearly as good for you, but will store longer. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life for white rice of 8-10 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. It should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Seeds or Sprouting Seeds
All viable seeds are hibernating tiny living plants that only need moisture and warmth to sprout. And much like a chick in an egg, all the nutrients this little life needs to spring into existence is contained within it's shell.
Like boiling an egg, heating a seed will kill that little life within it. However, unlike an egg, a seed can withstand cold temperatures. As seeds usually remain edible after the life within it dies, we must use different criteria when determining sproutable seed storage life. And again the big deciding factor is temperature. The big seed companies freeze their seed between seasons to promote long life. Of course, you can also do the same thing. Plan on a storage life of 4 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. They should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures. Rita Bingham's Sprouting Book suggests that "Vacuum sealed or nitrogen treated seeds store longest, with a shelf life of up to 15 years." This is presupposing they are kept very cool or frozen.
Alfalfa is a unique seed as it actually germinates better if the seed is 2 or 3 years old. Most any sample of alfalfa contains 'hard' seed and 'soft' seed. Soft seed germinates within two days while hard seed germinates in about a week. The problem is, by the time the soft seed sprouts are ready to harvest, the hard seed may not have germinated yet. As storage time draws on, the hard seed turns into soft seed. Older seed germinates closer together. Stored in good conditions, alfalfa seed should have a good percentage of germination up until it is 8 years old.
Total Vegetable Protein, made from soy beans, has an unusually long storage life. Hermetically sealed in the absence of oxygen, plan on a storage life of 15-20 years at a stable temperature of 70oF. TVP should keep proportionately longer if stored at cooler temperatures.
Yeast, a living organism, has a relatively short storage life. Keep yeast in the original metal foil storage containers. If the seal remains intact, yeast should last 2 years at 70oF. However it is strongly recommended that you refrigerate it, which should give you a storage life of 5 years. Frozen yeast should store for a long time

Temperature makes a big difference in shelf life of canned foods
Wornick's Estimated Sustained Shelf-life
Storage Temperatures (in months)
degrees in F degrees in C months
120 49 1
110 43 5
100 38 18
90 32 30
80 27 48
70 21 66
60 16 84
50 or less 10 or less 96


These are recommendations which I used as a guild line but adapted to suite my family and budget. It is cost effective.
Bean, Dry 75 lb per person servings: 393
Beverages 750 servings per person servings: 850
Baking soda 5 lb per person
Baking powder 5 lb per person
Egg 300 whole eggs per person servings: 380
Fats 34 1/4 lb per person servings: 388
Fruit 1250 servings each person
Grain 620 lb each person
Meat 75 lb wet 700 servings
Milk servings: 2219 6x… this means 6 servings per day; we have younger children to feed and we use milk in cooking.
Cheese 30 lb per person servings: 480
Salt 5lb per yr: Recommend 50 lb…. can’t have too much salt if your pickling, making kraut or pressuring meat, you will need a lot
Sugars 100 lb per person servings: 3200…also includes honey, syrup and hard candy. Relatively cheap calories and adds flavor to bland dishes liked boiled gains.
Starch, corn 5 lb per person… thickens soup & stews
Soup & Stew 250 servings
Vegetable 1000 servings per person
Vinegar 1 Gal. Per person

From your can label or manufactures web site, you can get this information. Your target is 2500 cal. per day per adult unless your chopping wood or working in very cold weather where 3500 cal would be better. Plan your servings to get there. Since wheat used to be cheap, so we stored raw grain to grind into bread, noodles, porridge ect to up calories when needed.
bean, great northern: Serving = 1 cup cooked (3 oz Dry); per#10 = 28; Calories 105
eggs, whole: Serving size: 1 tbsp. (0.5 oz dry) = 1 egg; per#10 = 108; Calories 75
oats, rolled reg. (20 lb per person) Serving = 1/3 cup dry (1.4 oz dry) per#10 = 29 Calories 150


I bought mostly dehydrated foods from Walton’s as it is cheaper than freeze dried and you get so many servings more per can. When I had the money, I bought real freeze dried meats and the are tastier than meat flavored TVP although TVP will supply the protein needed.

As far as preservatives, well that is sort of the name of the game here. I view stored foods as a crutch until you can produce enough of your own wholesome foods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
You are most welcome Guy_Lovejoy. Sharing information and ideas is a very impotent part of any Forum, IMO.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top