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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hubby and I are beginning new adventures in backpack camping. Think we found the perfect tent and backpacks. we are experienced in camping and also in dayhiking but now we want to combine them and keep it nice and simple. We are trying to find the best options for sleeping gear. Any suggestions on pads or sleeping bags or whatever else may be out there we dont know about. Got to make it light and easy to carry long distances.
 

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I can definately suggest the Thermarest self inflating pads if you're in a cold area. I'm from warm Texas, so I don't normally need something like that here. But I spent a few weeks backpacking in the Colorado Rockies in the middle of winter, and that was my best investment yet.

When you're looking for bags, get one rated to your coldest average temps, then get a liner for it. The liner adds a few degrees more warmth and makes for a comfy sleep in cold weather versus a "tolerable" one.
 

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I second MikeK's 'motion' - self-inflating mats. I have one that is at least 20 years old and I still use it. Used to hike a lot with it, now I use it on the floor of my Element and sleep on it on long trips (which I make a lot). Well worth whatever they cost these days.
 

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I second MikeK's 'motion' - self-inflating mats. I have one that is at least 20 years old and I still use it. Used to hike a lot with it, now I use it on the floor of my Element and sleep on it on long trips (which I make a lot). Well worth whatever they cost these days.
They do have a long life. I bought mine in the early '90s specifically for that one cold weather camping trip. I've used it almost every camping trip since, because it's more comfy than just a bag on the ground. Still working like new.
 

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I suggest the Thermarest Prolite Plus. I bought one for my wife, which I take on my own solo hikes. I have a Cabelas Alaskan sleeping pad which weighs 5 lbs and is very long. Too big and too heavy.

I'd also go with a compressible sleeping bag with down or a synthetic fill. REI is good at putting the stuff sack size and weights in their specs.
 
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