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Hail to the King, Baby
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Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at my BOB the other day and realized that it's not that I CAN'T ruck the same weight I could when younger, it's that I can't do it as long without pain that puts me out of the game.

My BOB weighs 65 pounds without firearm, ammo or one drop of water, everything else is accounted for.

I am looking at some points that I might need to address, such as:

Empty pack weight. I am using an alice pack hellcat conversion, bag is noticeably heavy when empty, especially considering the sleep system carrier and sustainment pouches are on it.

I have NO IDEA what is a good civilian pack, or what I should expect weight wise or price wise. Thinking about the Badlands sacrifice LS, takes the same hydration bladders as my body armor, and has a pistol holder, but I don't know.

The only reason for upgrading the pack would be to shed more weight. I rucked this exact setup fifteen miles in Petite Jean State Park, Ar. last year on their longest trail and it rode fine, just needs a way to carry water.

Sleeping bag: I currently have the MSS sleep system, weighs twelve pounds, need to upgrade. Aegismax UL sleeping bag and sol escape PRO emergency bivy look like winners. Does anyone have experience with the SOL escape pro, because I can't seem to find it anywhere.

Shelter: using the U.N./French surplus two man tent, weighs 7.5 pounds. MIGHT upgrade, can lose four pounds going to a snugpack ionosphere.

Inside I have a wal-mart dry bag with two skivvy rolls, one rolled set of "richard's" canvas jeans, a cotton flannel long sleeve, two shemahgs, and DOPP kit.

Does anyone else carry a change of clothes in their BOB?

I am at work right now, can't post pics of everything, but I will post a layout tonight.

I will post a pic of each gear requirement group (cutting, combustion, cover, cordage....) and invite critique.

I would like to try to cut the weight in half

Some of this stuff is getting relegated to a vehicle kit.

This thread is going to be pic-heavy.

Please advise, I'd like my back to stop hurting.
 

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Doesn't sound like a BOB at 65# BEFORE water and firearms. Sounds like an INCH.

I'd suggest your BOB stay under 25# before water and guns. Put INCH kit in a cart. You can buy a folding cart for your car from walmart for about $50. The wheels are a decent enough size, but if you're going off-road, then perhaps a game cart instead?
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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1,924 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Doesn't sound like a BOB at 65# BEFORE water and firearms. Sounds like an INCH.

I'd suggest your BOB stay under 25# before water and guns. Put INCH kit in a cart. You can buy a folding cart for your car from walmart for about $50. The wheels are a decent enough size, but if you're going off-road, then perhaps a game cart instead?
I know, right?

I got used to the premise of an Army packing list for a field problem, discovered prepping when I got out, and the ten C's merged with that, and then this huge bag was born.

For an INCH bag I always thought that should go in a truck, or a game cart. INCH bags make me think of Katrina.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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1,924 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Think I should think in terms of a long weekend out of my bag?

I always tried to think in terms of Murphy.

You WILL be wet, it WILL be raining, there WILL be bugs, you might very likely be injured, and the list goes on.

I tried to think in terms of nothing at all but the bag, run out the door, and make that work, mitigating things that go wrong en-route.

Somewhere along the way I went too far.
 

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I was looking at my BOB the other day and realized that it's not that I CAN'T ruck the same weight I could when younger, it's that I can't do it as long without pain that puts me out of the game.

My BOB weighs 65 pounds without firearm, ammo or one drop of water, everything else is accounted for.

I am looking at some points that I might need to address, such as:

Empty pack weight. I am using an alice pack hellcat conversion, bag is noticeably heavy when empty, especially considering the sleep system carrier and sustainment pouches are on it.

I have NO IDEA what is a good civilian pack, or what I should expect weight wise or price wise. Thinking about the Badlands sacrifice LS, takes the same hydration bladders as my body armor, and has a pistol holder, but I don't know.

The only reason for upgrading the pack would be to shed more weight. I rucked this exact setup fifteen miles in Petite Jean State Park, Ar. last year on their longest trail and it rode fine, just needs a way to carry water.

Sleeping bag: I currently have the MSS sleep system, weighs twelve pounds, need to upgrade. Aegismax UL sleeping bag and sol escape PRO emergency bivy look like winners. Does anyone have experience with the SOL escape pro, because I can't seem to find it anywhere.

Shelter: using the U.N./French surplus two man tent, weighs 7.5 pounds. MIGHT upgrade, can lose four pounds going to a snugpack ionosphere.

Inside I have a wal-mart dry bag with two skivvy rolls, one rolled set of "richard's" canvas jeans, a cotton flannel long sleeve, two shemahgs, and DOPP kit.

Does anyone else carry a change of clothes in their BOB?

I am at work right now, can't post pics of everything, but I will post a layout tonight.

I will post a pic of each gear requirement group (cutting, combustion, cover, cordage....) and invite critique.

I would like to try to cut the weight in half

Some of this stuff is getting relegated to a vehicle kit.

This thread is going to be pic-heavy.

Please advise, I'd like my back to stop hurting.
Your BOB is meant to get you home or to safety in a moderate amount of time and supply you with basic comforts in that time period.
You don't need a change of clothes for a BOB. You need a change of socks and underwear and maybe an extra mid-layer of clothing depending on the season and your local climate.
A few food selections that can sustain you for a 36-48 hr period.
A light source with a red lens, preferably a headlamp so you can illuminate while keeping your hands free
Anything based on the old Alice pack is outdated tech at this point.
None of us who humped an Alice back in the day is under 50 years of age; we aren't 18 anymore.
Your civilian pack should weigh at most 3-4 lbs empty. Good luck getting an ALICE down to that.
Get rid of the surplus tentage. get rid of the MSS. Not all at once, but as you can afford to swap out one piece of outdated gear from something new, do so.
Get rid of the cotton clothing and get something in synthetics. Lighter and more breathable.
 

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I would add...

A bicycle. Motorcycle....ATV.....

Our machines are our super powers. Hiking for FUN is fine and dandy. A perfectly acceptable hobby.

But in a disaster situation you need eveyr advantage you can get. Bugging out is fundamentally a very different situation than backpacking or hiking for fun.

Long term survival from a backpack, in anything even remotely close to comfortable, is not going to happen.
 

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Buy a couple 8 by 10 “space” tarps. Grabber is the company, I think. Much thicker and tougher than space blankets, but they still reflect heat. They have grommets for building shelter. One for a shelter, one for a blanket. Then you can get rid of the tent and the sleeping bag. If you have to run and escape, you probably won’t be sleeping much anyway.

I only have socks for spare clothing in my pack. In fall/winter I tie an expensive, lightweight, weatherproof coat to the bottom of my pack. It was the best coat I could afford.

My two water bottles are single wall, so I can cook with them, or boil water. I have 6 freeze dried meals and 9 lifeboat rations for food. Pretty light.

Maxpedition made my pack. No frame, expensive, but it’s been bulletproof.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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1,924 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Here in about two hours I'm going to get on the bathroom scale with and without my empty pack, and find out what it weighs. Next will be the clothes. No need to take a spare set, that's INCH territory.

The headlamp I currently use is a Coast brand about to be swapped with a Petzel brand w/ either green or red lens. Slightly lighter and much tougher.

The Badlands sacrifice LS weighs 3.3 pounds empty.

Bear in mind most of this was bought when I was MUCH poorer than I am now. I can afford better gear, and can sell some of my Mil-spec stuff to a couple of young guys on the crew I work with.
 

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Hail to the King, Baby
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1,924 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Buy a couple 8 by 10 “space” tarps. Grabber is the company, I think. Much thicker and tougher than space blankets, but they still reflect heat. They have grommets for building shelter. One for a shelter, one for a blanket. Then you can get rid of the tent and the sleeping bag. If you have to run and escape, you probably won’t be sleeping much anyway.

I only have socks for spare clothing in my pack. In fall/winter I tie an expensive, lightweight, weatherproof coat to the bottom of my pack. It was the best coat I could afford.

My two water bottles are single wall, so I can cook with them, or boil water. I have 6 freeze dried meals and 9 lifeboat rations for food. Pretty light.

Maxpedition made my pack. No frame, expensive, but it’s been bulletproof.
what model of Maxpedition pack do you have?
 

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Here in about two hours I'm going to get on the bathroom scale with and without my empty pack, and find out what it weighs. Next will be the clothes. No need to take a spare set, that's INCH territory.

The headlamp I currently use is a Coast brand about to be swapped with a Petzel brand w/ either green or red lens. Slightly lighter and much tougher.

The Badlands sacrifice LS weighs 3.3 pounds empty.

Bear in mind most of this was bought when I was MUCH poorer than I am now. I can afford better gear, and can sell some of my Mil-spec stuff to a couple of young guys on the crew I work with.
What’s INCH?
 

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I'm planning a 12 day hike on mostly flat ground. I took the straps out of an Army pack frame and attached them to my freighter frame top and then added an axle and 13 inch wheels to the other end. My 60 pound pack just follows me while I walk. When I have to carry it I can use the pack straps and the wheels are outside my body.
 

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I’m not sure what exactly a bug out bag is supposed to accomplish any more than my backpacking setup, but if you want to reduce weight, get a digital kitchen or postage scale and weigh EVERYTHING. My backpacking setup is usually 15-20 lbs and that includes a camp chair to rest my back and all the comforts to keep me warm, rested, fed, and insect free. It’s not roughing it by any means. A tarp wont keep the bugs off you at night....my Lightweight tent weighs 2.5 lbs and is fully screened with a rain fly. I can sit up and relax in my undies in hot weather.

I could go on and on but you really need to weigh everything and determine if you will need it or if there is a lighter alternative. Look to the ultralight backpackers to see how to lighten your load and not give up comforts.

Just another quick tip...use disposable single use water bottles instead of fancy canteens and bladders
 

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I'm planning a 12 day hike on mostly flat ground. I took the straps out of an Army pack frame and attached them to my freighter frame top and then added an axle and 13 inch wheels to the other end. My 60 pound pack just follows me while I walk. When I have to carry it I can use the pack straps and the wheels are outside my body.
You should modify it, to put skis on it in winter.
 

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Born 120 years too late.
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THE WAY I used to look at the world...
and
the way I still pack out when going bush, especially Alaska.
EVERYTHING of absolute critical importance is NOT in the pack, it is on/in my NEVER SHED vest and on my belt. . The vest holds space blanket, fire starter, etc etc that I will NEVER toss off under any circumstances. Same for belt loads.
everything else that I would like to have goes into the pack.

IF you are taking a dump and whether it be an OPFOR or a bear that comes across you in that compromising position, you may have to take off and leave pack behind.
The vest NEVER comes off. Pack it accordingly.

I have a couple different LBVs that each have unique properties and you pick as to your plans. One is warmer, has fewer pockets but they are bigger and even padded shoulders. Another has more pockets than a pack of kangaroos and a rear pouch that allows me to throw a full poncho in the back and still have room for more "stuff"
 
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