Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Long Term Survival Expert
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the Amazon the Cassava plant is the primary dietary food source of the Amazon Natives. They use it primarily to make cassava flour which dehydrated meal substance like corn meal. It can be used for an almost unlimited number for meal options and it will store for years if you keep it dry. It is has a 1 to 4 expansiveness ratio when re-hydrated, which means a little goes a long way. I have spent months surviving in the jungle with these Indians off of nothing but cassava flour and meat, all while paddles canoes for hundreds of miles. Cassava flour has much more nutritional value then wheat flour and has a lot of fiber. The problem is that it is expensive to acquire in the US because it is imported from Africa. I am trying to acquire some cassava plants to experiment in growing the plant here in the US. If I am successful I will be more then glad to not only help others grow this plant, but also teach them how to make cassava flour. The other benefit is that the leaves of the plant itself it very useful. The leaves are very nutritious and can be eaten like spinach or collard greens. The plant does not grow from seeds. The actual stalk of the plant is sectional and each section can sprouted out for a new plant. So far I have been unable to find a source for the plant, even though I have seen some information about people growing it in Florida. This plant could be an essential part of survival for thousands of people as one plant can produce 100lbs of tubers in a season. The tubers can be used like potatoes right out of the ground, or your can turn them into flour for long term storage. During the dehydration process the by product is pure starch. This starch is used in the US under the name of "Tapioca", but it is the same thing as corn starch and can be used for many other things and is an alternate source of carbohydrates. So essentially, every part of the cassava plant has useful. There is no waste.

If anyone can find a source for cassava plants, I would greatly appreciate you passing that information along. I am looking for sweet cassava plants, not poisonous cassava. The flour from the poisonous cassava plant is actually much better, but it is kind of like the Golden Blow fish, if you don't prepare it right, your dead, since the poisonous cassava root is full of cyanide. I have eaten hundreds of pounds of the stuff prepared by Amazon Natives, but I think it would be a little dangerous for most Americans to try to make the stuff themselves. Thanks
 

·
Wild Edibles Expert
Joined
·
10,167 Posts
Be very, very careful. Cassava varities raised on commercial farms have had the hydrocyanic acid reduce in them. Cassave in the wild will kill you if you don't process it correctly. Make sure you know what you are getting.
 

·
Still here...
Joined
·
1,153 Posts
Do you know the Latin name? Is it Manihot esculenta? Or is that a different variety? I'm not familiar with the plant, but I am into herbs. Searching for common names is a hard way to find a plant. You'll have better luck searching on the Latin name. I just did a quick search and didn't get a good hit on Cassava as a plant but found a few plants for sale under Manihot esculenta.
 

·
Wild Edibles Expert
Joined
·
10,167 Posts
Did you read my whole post?
Thanks for the insult. Yes, I read your whole post. That's what adults to do. Are you a plant expert? I am. Do you know what variety of cassava you have when it is in your hand? I do. If you do not, then my advice is very pertinent. Be careful, or you can make yourself very ill or kill yourself. Even cultivated cassava has toxic principles.

On the other hand, forget it. Figure it out on your own.
 

·
Long Term Survival Expert
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am very sorry if you felt insulted by my question. I don't know you personally, or your qualifications, so when you warned me about the dangers of cassava (something I had stated very clearly in my post that I was completely aware of), I just assumed that like many people I have dealt with in the past, you simply scanned my post and responded to the basic subject that I was looking to grow cassava. I was not trying to insult you. I was simply asking if you had carefully read my post and seen the part where I stated that I know that cassava can kill you dead. The only thing I know about you is that you told me something that had already made clear that I knew. It was simply logical deduction to assume that you had not fully read my post. If I was wrong, I humbly ask for your forgiveness.

On the subject of logical deduction, let me tell you a joke just to make up for the hard feelings.

This guy met another guy at the bus stop and they were talking. The first guy asked the second guy what he did for a living and he responded, " I am a professor of Logical Deduction." Wow, said the first guy, how does that work? Let me give you a demonstration said the second guy? Do you have a dog? Yes, responded the first guy. From that I logically deduce that you have a back yard, said the second guy. That is correct, said the first guy. Well, from that I deduce that you have a house. Correct again, said the first guy. From all that I deduce that you are married and have kids, said the second guy. Sure am, said the first guy. From that I deduce that you are a heterosexual, concluded the first guy. Wow! That's amazing! exclaimed the second guy. The first guy got on the bus and went to work. When he got to work he told his boss that he had met a professor of logical deduction at the bus stop. What is that? Asked the boss. Well, let me give you a demonstration, said the first guy. Do you have a dog? No, said the boss. Wow boss, I didn't know you were gay! :)
 

·
Long Term Survival Expert
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
1) Not everyone on the internet is an empty-headed blithering juvenile.

True. But we are all imperfect by nature and subject to making mistake and wrong assumptions based on limited information. This was the point of the joke. I know that I am not perfect and I made a wrong assumption about you based on the limited information available to me. But unlike many people who take themselves too seriously and are too prideful to admit that they are imperfect and made a mistake, I did apologize and tried to lighten the air between us by telling a joke that was actually pointed at myself in that I made the same mistake as the guy in the joke. The humor and the underlying parallel indication was obviously lost on you. Well, I have done all I can do to undo the unintentional damage to our relationship. The ball is in your court. You can chose to accept my apology and accept that you misinterpreted my question that was not intended to be insulting, but was a simply an inquiry to affirm that you were aware that I was aware of what you were saying. This would be good because I think that we both my have experience that may be beneficial to one another; you probably more then me, but I have spent over 20 years actually living in and studying south american jungles, so I might just a few tidbits of information you might find intriguing. Or you can choose refuse to accept the truth and remain insulted. If this is the case, then there is no point in having any further discussion and I politely ask you to leave this thread alone so I can continue my research on the subject of this thread which has been completely abandon as a result of this conversation.
 

·
Long Term Survival Expert
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am still looking for a source for cassava plants in the US. Does anyone know where I can get some plants?
 

·
Long Term Survival Expert
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Did you try searching on the Latin name?
Yes I did and thank you for the suggestion. I have only been able to find one guy that sales cuttings, but he does not and has not had any for sale for over a year now. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
Getting back on topic, besides the issue of toxicity, which is very real, cassava may not be a choice appropriate for Texas, as it is a semi-perennial that is killed by freezing temperatures. It may also not react favorably with the dry climate you have in Texas.

My wife's family is from an country that you could call equitorial jungle habitat, and I've myself eaten cassava grown in the family's back yard. While you may get cassava to survive in Texas, I wouldn't believe the yield would be anything comparable to a wet tropical climate. I'd expect the water demands to be very high.

Since cassava's main attribute serves as a good source of edible starch, you might be better served looking at plants better aclimated to a desert environment. Sweet potato can be high yielding, and I think you'd have less of a learning curve with it than cassava.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,625 Posts
jungleexplorer's last activity was several months ago, and this thread was more than two years dead.

Taking a quick look at the nutritional profile, cassava doesn't seem to have any significant advantages over sweet potatoes or corn for warm climate crops, except VitC, which is abundant in a lot of other easy to grow things.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top