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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone:

Well, I am a new member here so, I have decided to make and introduction about me.

I`ve been training and teaching survival skills for many years in several landscapes like jungle and forest of Argentine, a country located at the southern end of the South american continent (World`s End).

As I enjoy very much talking, living and experiencing everything regarding to the "Survival life" and I also like to be in touch with people who like it to exchange information about it, I took the advantage to join you on this forum. I would like to share information regarding to the survival and also, learn from you and expose info too.

My sporting activity is not only Woodland Survival, also I like the "Orienteering" sport using a compass and a topographic map as a main elements to navigate on the terrain, and also, "Moutaneering" and "Trekking", outdoor sporting disciplines I have been doing since the beginning of 1998.

On another way, next year I am organizing the "First National and International Competition of Survival and Orienteering" to be carried out in woodland zones of my country (Buenos Aires). As soon as I know the date I will let you know.

Best regards, Gabriel Esquivel
My web: www.northlatitude.com.ar
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Glad to see you aboard.
Very intersted in your advice.
I learnt to Nav. in the military with map, compass and protractor. Also used it to do path profiles for LOS communications.

It is still my preferred way to navigate in the bush.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Dedragon:

Thank for your warm reception on this forum.

Well, according to your experience in navigation while being in the military, you know that there are quite a lot of differences in everything regarding to the tactics and strategies used to navigate on any terrain.

I think that you not only need to practice some techniques about Survivor skills, if not, you need to practice a lot on Orienteering and Land Navigation techniques, training that is very important to face a real emergency (a survival activity) in the wilderness.

I agree with you when you said "It is still my preferred way to navigate in the bush". Why? because navigation on the mountains is quite different and more difficult than navigating in the bush. For example, in order to navigate in a forest land, you only need to know which direction to follow, in accordance to the information provided by a compass needle. Maybe the path you have to follow in the bush are very short (by segments) because of the density of vegetation (trees, bushes, branches, etc) but navigating on the mountains is more difficult due to what I used to call it as "the third dimention" (the altitude). The real problem on the mountain is how can you make your way to navigate in the altitude when there would be some clouds that would not allow you to follow a certain direction.

Gabriel
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Yep,
Night navigation can be similar, particularly with no moon. More so being unable to see the ground for footing directly in front of you. In some places there is just enough star light to see objects at short distances, but it raises another issue of night vision.
Very easy to become disorientated.
I have found, a good basic knowledge of the star constellations on a clear night is also very helpfull.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, which one is the good basic knowledge of the star constellations you have found to navigate on a clear night, from where you live? could it be the "Polar star", valid to provide you with an orientation that will allow you later make a night navigation in the north hemisphere?

Here in the south hemisphere (I live in Argentine) we are used to make night navigation (from time to time, no ever) by knowing the spacial position in the sky of the "cross of the south", a constellation formed by four stars that teach you where is the south located.

Gabriel
 

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AKA The Dragon
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We have the Southern Cross, could be the same constellation in your location, to find where south is.
Also the evening star (Planet Venus) to indicate where east is, and the morning star to indicate where west is at certain times of the year.
Satelites are some times used, as their movement across the night can also indicate direction, but this can be a little tricky sometimes. Only at certain times of the night though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Southern Cross - Orion Knife

Thedragon:

ies, I meant the Southern Cross, as you correctly said. I am used to see from time to time in the night, some satelites moving along their orbits (maybe you seen them illuminated by the sun at higher altitudes), presumably going from north to south direction but, I`ve never tried to know where there would go.

Here is also used to navigate in the night (I do not used it), the constellation named "Orion Knife". This constellation is formed by some stars and the suppose point of the knife marks the real geographic north. The measure of the real north is not very accurate because I could figure out once that there were a difference of 30*°+ between the real north and the direction marked by the knife.

Gabriel
 

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AKA The Dragon
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Is that the scabard on Orions belt? I think it is but correct me if I am wrong.
The head of Scorpio points pretty close to west, but at certain times of the year is only visible for a few hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, I just searched some pictures of the Orions belt and realized you are right. Well, here in South america we called in different way, may I am wrong or maybe some countrymen of mine know that constellations as you said.

Gabriel
 
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