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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another question,
I have a couple of j tubes in my bag but I'm noticing that more and more people are carrying nasopharyngeal tubes. So again, are the tubes more effective or are they being used because J tubes can be a bit tricky to insert?

R.
 

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Prov 3:18
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This stems from the military TCCC course.They chose the NPA because it generally doesn't stimilate the gag reflex as much as an OPA, when both are properly sized.There are some contraindications for the NPA(basilar skull fracture) but by and large they are easier to use for a semiconscious patient.Neither are a "secure" airway and still allow occlusion by vomitus and bleeding,but are a lot better than no airway at all(just need to reasses and suction or reposition as needed).If you carry an IFAK you need to size the NPA to you(midline of nose to corner of the jaw and the largest diameter you can fit in the nares),if they are too long they can stimulate the gag,too short they do nothing,too large they can cause bleeding even when lubricated. If you have them in your bag you need different sizes and either scissors or narrow tape to make sure they aren't inserted too far. The military uses either 28 or 30fr in their IFAKs and most adults have no trouble with this size being too large,but if you go on youtube you can see multiple examples of students gaging when they are inserted and it is most likely they were inserted too far.A simple fix is to size them as above then take a narrow(1/4") strip of cloth tape about 6" long ,wrap the NPA twice at the end of the insertion depth, leave the end of the tape to be used to secure the NPA to the nose.
 

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"Normal" is an illusion
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So, the nasopharyngeal goes in through your nose, and the OPA through your throat, right?
And it's generally thought that it's easier to go through a person's nose?
Ok, I get it. I'll check this out more later on the ole 'goog'
But has anyone here actually done either and can say first hand which they prefer?
Thanks.
 

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Remember Murphy's Ridge.
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So, the nasopharyngeal goes in through your nose, and the OPA through your throat, right?
And it's generally thought that it's easier to go through a person's nose?
Ok, I get it. I'll check this out more later on the ole 'goog'
But has anyone here actually done either and can say first hand which they prefer?
Thanks.
By 'through' the throat do you mean by mouth? Don't confuse it with a tracheotomy. The OPA goes in the mouth and keeps the pharynx open. I've used both several times. The naso is good for an unconscious patient who is breathing and has a gag reflex but just needs assistance with ventilations. The oral is for unconscious patients usually not breathing with no gag reflex. The oral is usually a temporary fix to establish a patent airway to buy time for an advanced airway.
 

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Prov 3:18
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What are they called in new school mil-speak?
No idea,that's just what my ROTC 1stSGT called them 20 years ago.


I've done both and between the two I feel the OPA is a better airway,but good luck getting one in a clamped down head injury patient,so I can see why they chose the NPA.Honestly though both are little better than a jaw thrust in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just to clarify, the OPA keeps the airway open by preventing the tongue from going back and blocking the airway. It doesn't physically open the larynx.

R.
 

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Remember Murphy's Ridge.
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Just to clarify, the OPA keeps the airway open by preventing the tongue from going back and blocking the airway. It doesn't physically open the larynx.

R.
Maybe I need to review my A&P, and please correct me if I'm way off, but wouldn't preventing the tongue from going back and blocking the airway effectively open the pharynx? Oh, I see now you said larynx. My bad. Maybe we both helped clarify. Or maybe I just confused someone. :xeye:
 

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Remember Murphy's Ridge.
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Just to clarify, the OPA keeps the airway open by preventing the tongue from going back and blocking the airway. It doesn't physically open the larynx.

R.
Nothing you said here was wrong though. It's all good. :thumb:
 

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It's useful, but i think good bag/mask holding techniques would be far more important. Holding a mask correctly is a skill and one that's worth having if you have that kind of equipment.

what sort of ventilation equipment do you have if you're getting airway support in your kit?
 

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I've got a full set of OPAs in my BLS kit (also no colors, check every time, no excuses,) but will be getting NPAs as soon as I can. I just wish I could afford one of the nicer battery powered medical suction units (sorry to any browsing trolls, that does mean a completely un-fun piece of machinery.)

I'm so far out in the boondocks, and the neighbors are the sort that may delay getting care for fear they'll be asked if they have a green card.
 

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"Normal" is an illusion
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By 'through' the throat do you mean by mouth? Don't confuse it with a tracheotomy. The OPA goes in the mouth and keeps the pharynx open. I've used both several times. The naso is good for an unconscious patient who is breathing and has a gag reflex but just needs assistance with ventilations. The oral is for unconscious patients usually not breathing with no gag reflex. The oral is usually a temporary fix to establish a patent airway to buy time for an advanced airway.
Yes, I didn't mean to say 'throat', I did mean through the mouth.
I just thought that these would be a useful addition to my FAK for a shtf scenario.
Thanks for all of the responses to my request for clarification. I've got lots to learn, that's for sure.
I was thinking it might be good to take a 'first responder' type of class/course?!?
 

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Remember Murphy's Ridge.
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Yes, I didn't mean to say 'throat', I did mean through the mouth.
I just thought that these would be a useful addition to my FAK for a shtf scenario.
Thanks for all of the responses to my request for clarification. I've got lots to learn, that's for sure.
I was thinking it might be good to take a 'first responder' type of class/course?!?
Ever think of becoming an EMT?
 
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